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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 143 (search)
e city Nineve; and named his subjects Assyrians, who became the most fortunate nation, beyond others. Arphaxad named the Arphaxadites, who are now called Chaldeans. Aram had the Aramites, which the Greeks called Syrians; as Laud founded the Laudites, which are now called Lydians. Of the four sons of Aram, Uz founded Trachonitis and Damascus: this country lies between Palestine and Celesyria. Ul founded Armenia; and Gather the Bactrians; and Mesa the Mesaneans; it is now called Charax Spasini. Sala was the son of Arphaxad; and his son was Heber, from whom they originally called the Jews Hebrews. That the Jews were called Hebrews from this their progenitor Heber, our author Josephus here rightly affirms; and not from Abram the Hebrew, or passenger over Euphrates, as many of the moderns suppose. Shem is also called the father of all the children of Heber, or of all the Hebrews, in a history long before Abram passed over Euphrates, Genesis 10:21, though it must be confessed that, Genesis 1
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 148 (search)
was Terah, who was the father of Abraham, who accordingly was the tenth from Noah, and was born in the two hundred and ninety-second year after the deluge; for Terah begat Abram in his seventieth year. Nahor begat Haran when he was one hundred and twenty years old; Nahor was born to Serug in his hundred and thirty-second year; Ragau had Serug at one hundred and thirty; at the same age also Phaleg had Ragau; Heber begat Phaleg in his hundred and thirty-fourth year; he himself being begotten by Sala when he was a hundred and thirty years old, whom Arphaxad had for his son at the hundred and thirty-fifth year of his age. Arphaxad was the son of Shem, and born twelve years after the deluge. Now Abram had two brethren, Nahor and Haran: of these Haran left a son, Lot; as also Sarai and Milcha his daughters; and died among the Chaldeans, in a city of the Chaldeans, called Ur; and his monument is shown to this day. These married their nieces. Nabor married Milcha, and Abram married Sarai. Now
Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 2, section 176 (search)
eks]; but, upon the whole, I think it necessary to mention those names, that I may disprove such as believe that we came not originally from Mesopotamia, but are Egyptians. Now Jacob had twelve sons; of these Joseph was come thither before. We will therefore set down the names of Jacob's children and grandchildren. Reuben had four sons - Anoch, Phallu, Assaron, Charmi. Simeon had six - Jamuel, Jamin, Avod, Jachin, Soar, Saul. Levi had three sons - Gersom, Caath, Merari. Judas had three sons - Sala, Phares, Zerah; and by Phares two grandchildren, Esrom and Amar. Issachar had four sons - Thola, Phua, Jasob, Samaron. Zabulon had with him three sons - Sarad, Helon, Jalel. So far is the posterity of Lea; with whom went her daughter Dinah. These are thirty-three. Rachel had two sons, the one of whom, Joseph, had two sons also, Manasses and Ephraim. The other, Benjamin, had ten sons - Bolau, Bacchar, Asabel, Geras, Naaman, Jes, Ros, Momphis, Opphis, Arad. These fourteen added to the thirty-th
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Henry Austell by Venice and thence to Ragusa over land, and so to Constantinople: and from thence by Moldavia , Polonia , Silesia and Germanie to Hamburg, &c. (search)
the left hand, and travailed all that night. The 25. we met with Master Sanders upon the heathes, and passed by a towne of the duke of Lunenborg called Geffherne, and from thence through many waters, wee lay that night within an English mile of Brunswig. The 27. we lay at Halberstat, which is a great towne subject to the bishop of that towne. The 28. we baited at Erinsleiben : and there wee entred into the duke of Saxon his countrey: and the same night we lay at a towne called Eisleben , where Martine Luther was borne. The 29. we passed by Mansfield , where there are many Copper mines: and so that night went to Neuburg upon the river of Sala ; and at that time there was a great faire. The 30. we baited at a proper towne called Jena upon the same river, and the same night wee lay at Cone upon that river. The first of July we baited at Salfeld: and the same day we entred first into the great woods of firre trees, and that night to Grevandal; The second to dinner to
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A description of the yeerely voyage or pilgrimage of the Mahumitans, Turkes and Moores unto Mecca in Arabia . (search)
homet, at which sight they light from their horses in token of reverence. And being ascended up the sayd mountaine with shouting which pierceth the skies they say, Sala tuua salema Alaccha Jarah sul Allah. Sala tuua Salema Alaccha Janabi Allah, Sala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Sala tuua Salema Alaccha Janabi Allah, Sala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Prayer and health be unto thee, oh prophet of God: prayer and health be upon thee, oh beloved of God. And having pronounced this salutation, they proceed on their journey, so that they lodge that night within three miles of Medina: and the next morn ing the captaine of the pilgrimage ariseth, & proceeding towards the city, and draSala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Prayer and health be unto thee, oh prophet of God: prayer and health be upon thee, oh beloved of God. And having pronounced this salutation, they proceed on their journey, so that they lodge that night within three miles of Medina: and the next morn ing the captaine of the pilgrimage ariseth, & proceeding towards the city, and drawing neere, there commeth the governour under the Serifo, accompanied with his people to receive the Carovan, having pitched their tents in the midst of a goodly field where they lodge. Of Medina. MEDINA is a little city of great antiquity, containing in circuit not above two miles, having therein b
homet, at which sight they light from their horses in token of reverence. And being ascended up the sayd mountaine with shouting which pierceth the skies they say, Sala tuua salema Alaccha Jarah sul Allah. Sala tuua Salema Alaccha Janabi Allah, Sala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Sala tuua Salema Alaccha Janabi Allah, Sala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Prayer and health be unto thee, oh prophet of God: prayer and health be upon thee, oh beloved of God. And having pronounced this salutation, they proceed on their journey, so that they lodge that night within three miles of Medina: and the next morn ing the captaine of the pilgrimage ariseth, & proceeding towards the city, and draSala tuua Salema Allaccha Jahabit Allah: which words in the Arabian tongue signifie: Prayer and health be unto thee, oh prophet of God: prayer and health be upon thee, oh beloved of God. And having pronounced this salutation, they proceed on their journey, so that they lodge that night within three miles of Medina: and the next morn ing the captaine of the pilgrimage ariseth, & proceeding towards the city, and drawing neere, there commeth the governour under the Serifo, accompanied with his people to receive the Carovan, having pitched their tents in the midst of a goodly field where they lodge.
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A voiage made out of England unto Guinea and Benin in Affrike, at the charges of certaine marchants Adventurers of the Citie of London, in the yeere of our Lord 1553. (search)
the kingdom of Marocco. The principall citie of Fes is called Fessa: and the chiefe citie of Marocco is named Marocco. Mauritania Caesariensis is at this day called the kingdom of Tremisen, with also the citie called Tremisen or Telensin. This region is full of deserts, and reacheth to the Sea Mediterraneum, to the citie of Oram, with the port of Mersalquiber. The kingdom of Fes reacheth unto the Ocean Sea, from the West to the citie of Argilla: and the port of the sayd kingdom is called Sala . The kingdom of Marocco is also extended above the Ocean Sea, unto the citie of Azamor and Azafi, which are upon the Ocean Sea, toward the West of the sayd kingdom. Nere Mauritania Tingitana (that is to say, by the two kingdoms of Fes, and Marocco) are in the Sea, the Ilands of Canarie, called in old time, The fortunate Ilands. Toward the South of this region is the kingdom of Guinea, with Senega, Jalofo, Gambra, and many other regions of the Blacke Moores, called Aethiopians or Negros
e soldiers, about to return to their regiments, were somewhat excited by liquor, and consequently rather boisterous, but not belligerent — were more disposed for fun than fight. About four o'clock, a soldier, Oliver Sallee, stepped up to Nelson Wells, who has been regarded as the leader of the copperheads in this county, and placing his hand good-naturedly against him, playfully asked him if there were any butternuts in town? Wells replied, Yes, I am one! and drawing his revolver, shot at Sallee, but missed him. In an instant Sallee was shot from another direction, and fell; but raising himself up, he fired at Wells, the ball taking effect in his vitals. He (Wells) went as far as Chambers & McCrory's store, and, passing in, fell dead. The copperheads were gathered behind Judge Edwards's office, loading their firearms, and then would step out and fire from the corner at the soldiers indiscriminately, with guns and revolvers. Of course, having come fully prepared, they had vastly
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.17 (search)
also was sincere and earnest as he replied,-- I feel most thankful that I am here to welcome you. The principal Arabs now advanced, and I was presented by the Doctor to Sayed bin Majid, a relative of the Prince of Zanzibar; to Mahommed bin Sali, the Governor of Ujiji; to Abed bin Suliman, a rich merchant; to Mahommed bin Gharib, a constant good friend; and to many other notable friends and neighbours. Then, remarking that the sun was very hot, the Doctor led the way to the verandah ofuit jam, besides sweet milk and clabber, and then a silver tea-pot full of best tea, and beautiful china cups and saucers to drink it from. Before we could commence this already magnificent breakfast, the servants of Sayed bin Majid, Mohammed bin Sali, and Muini Kheri brought three great trays loaded with cakes, curries, hashes, and stews, and three separate hillocks of white rice, and we looked at one another with a smile of wonder at this Ujiji banquet. We drew near to it, and the Doctor u
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, chapter 2.21 (search)
presents and choice gifts were exchanged; in fact, our intercourse was thoroughly fraternal. But his fall suddenly put a barrier in some strange way between us. If the British Consul-general expressed a desire to pay a visit to him, some excuse of a relapse was given. If I wished to go over to Bagamoyo, his condition immediately became critical. Surgeon Parke, who attended to him for the first three weeks, found that things were not so pleasant for him as formerly. If I sent my black boy, Sali, to him with a note of condolence, and some suggestion, the boy was told he would be hanged if he went to the hospital again! To our officers, Dr. Parke and Mr. Jephson, he freely complained of the German officers. My friendly note, asking him to have some regard to his reputation, was at once shown by him to Major Wissmann. It was curious, too, how the Pasha, who thought at Equatoria that his people were so dear to him that he professed himself ready to sacrifice his future for them, drop
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