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Demosthenes, Speeches 31-40 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs) 4 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Alcestis (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Rhesus (ed. Gilbert Murray) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 2 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs) 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis 2 0 Browse Search
Plato, Laws 2 0 Browse Search
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Euripides, Andromache (ed. David Kovacs), line 1231 (search)
set you free from mortal woe and make you a god, deathless and exempt from decay. And then you shall dwell with me in the house of Nereus, god with goddess, for all time to come. From there, walking dry-shod out of the deep you will see your beloved son and mine, Achilles, dwelling in his island home on the strand of Leuke in the Sea Inhospitable.A tradition going back to the epic poet Arctinus said that Achilles' ghost haunted the island of Leuke, opposite the mouth of the Danube in the Euxine Sea. But go to the god-built city of Delphi with the body of this man, and when you have buried him in earth, go to the hollow cave on the ancient promontory of Sepias and sit. Wait there until I come from the sea with a chorus of fifty Nereids to escort you. You must carry out the course that fate prescribes, for this is the will of Zeus. Cease from your grieving for the dead. For this is the judgement that stands over all mortals and death is their debt to pay.Exit Thetis by the mechane.
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs), line 1 (search)
Aphrodite enters above the skene. Aphrodite Mighty and of high renown, among mortals and in heaven alike, I am called the goddess Aphrodite. Of all those who dwell between the Euxine Sea and the Pillars of Atlas and look on the light of the sun, I honor those who reverence my power, but I lay low all those who think proud thoughts against me. For in the gods as well one finds this trait: they enjoy receiving honor from mortals. The truth of these words I shall shortly demonstrate. Hippolytus, Theseus' son by the Amazon woman and ward of holy Pittheus, alone among the citizens of this land of Trozen, says that I am the basest of divinities. He shuns the bed of love and will have nothing to do with marriage. Instead, he honors Apollo's sister Artemis, Zeus's daughter, thinking her the greatest of divinities. In the green wood, ever consort to the maiden goddess, he clears the land of wild beasts with his swift dogs and has gained a companionship greater than mortal. To this pair I
Euripides, Hippolytus (ed. David Kovacs), line 1021 (search)
r at you, father. For if you were my son and I your father, I would not have banished but killed you, if you had dared to put your hand to my wife. Theseus How like you these words are! Not thus will you die, according to the rule you have just laid down for yourself—for a swift death is a mercy for a wretch—but going as a wanderer from your ancestral land over foreign soil you will drain to the dregs a life of misery. [For that is the penalty for an impious man.] Hippolytus Alas! What do you mean to do? Will you not even receive the witness of Time in my case but banish me from the land? Theseus Yes, beyond the Euxine Sea and the Pillars of Atlas, if I could, such is my hatred of you. Hippolytus Will you not examine my oath and sworn testimony or the words of seers? Will you banish me without a trial? Theseus There's no divinatory chanciness about this tablet, and its accusation against you deserves my trust. As for the birds that fly above my head, I bid them a long farew
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 123 (search)
Chorus Keep a holy silence, you who inhabit the double clashing rocks of the Black Sea! O daughter of Leto, Dictynna of the mountains, to your hall, to the golden walls of your temple with beautiful pillars, I, the servant of the holy key-holder, bend my holy virgin steps. For I have left the towers and walls of Hellas, famous for horses, and Europe with its forests, my father's home. I have come. What is the news? What is troubling you? Why have you brought me, brought me to the shrine, you who are the daughter of Atreus' son, master of a thousand ships and ten thousand soldiers, who came to the towers of Troy with a famous fleet?
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 236 (search)
ave come to this land, fleeing the dark Symplegades in their ship, an offering and sacrifice pleasing to the goddess Artemis. Be quick to prepare the purifications and the first offerings. Iphigenia What country are the strangers from? How are they dressed? Herdsman They are Hellenes; I know this one thing, and nothing further. Iphigenia Can't you tell me their names? Did you hear them? Herdsman One was called Pylades by the other. Iphigenia What is the name of his companion? Herdsman No one knows; we didn't hear it. Iphigenia How did you see them? How did you come upon them and catch them? Herdsman At the edge of the breakers of the Black Sea— Iphigenia And what do herdsmen have to do with the sea? Herdsman We came to wash our cattle in the salt water. Iphigenia Go back to the earlier question, how did you take them, and in what way, for I want to know this. They have come after a long time; the altar of the goddess has not yet been reddened by streams of Hellene bloo
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 295 (search)
word, and follow me.” But when we saw our enemies brandishing their two swords, we fled and filled up the rocky glens. But while some would flee, others pressed on and attacked them; if they drove those back, the ones who had just given way struck them with stones again. But it was hard to believe; with so many hands, no one succeeded in hitting these offerings to the goddess. We got the better of them with difficulty; not by daring, but by surrounding them in a circle, with stones we took away their swords; they sank on their knees to the ground, in weariness. Then we brought them to the lord of this land. He saw them, and at once sent them to you, for purification and slaughter. You have prayed for such sacrificial victims as these strangers, lady; if you destroy them, Hellas will make atonement for your murder and pay the penalty for the sacrifice in Aulis. Chorus Leader You have told an amazing story about this madman, whoever he is, who has come from Hellas to the Black Sea
Euripides, Iphigenia in Tauris (ed. Robert Potter), line 421 (search)
Chorus The rocks that rush together, the sleepless shores of Phineus—how did they cross them, running along the salty coast on Amphitrite's surge, where the fifty daughters of Nereus . . . the circular choruses sing, with wind in the sails, the guiding rudder creaking under the stern, with southern breezes or by the blasts of the west wind, to the land of many birds, the white strand, Achilles' lovely race-course, over the Black Sea
Euripides, Medea (ed. David Kovacs), line 205 (search)
Chorus I have heard her cry full of groans, how she utters shrill charges against the husband who betrayed her bed. Having suffered wrong she raises her cry to Zeus's daughter, Themis, goddess of oaths, the goddess who brought herThemis ‘brought her to Hellas’ in that she came to Greece relying on Jason's oath. to Hellas across the sea through the dark salt-water over the briny gateway of the Black Sea, a gateway few traverse.‘The briny gateway [lit. “key”] of the Euxine’is probably the Bosporus, beyond which, on the Propontis and Hellespont, lay numerous Greek settlements in histo
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 6 (search)
Croesus was a Lydian by birth, son of Alyattes, and sovereign of all the nations west of the river Halys, which flows from the south between Syria and Paphlagonia and empties into the sea called Euxine. This Croesus was the first foreigner whom we know who subjugated some Greeks and took tribute from them, and won the friendship of others: the former being the Ionians, the Aeolians, and the Dorians of Asia, and the latter the Lacedaemonians. Before the reign of Croesus, all Greeks were free: fows from the south between Syria and Paphlagonia and empties into the sea called Euxine. This Croesus was the first foreigner whom we know who subjugated some Greeks and took tribute from them, and won the friendship of others: the former being the Ionians, the Aeolians, and the Dorians of Asia, and the latter the Lacedaemonians. Before the reign of Croesus, all Greeks were free: for the Cimmerian host which invaded Ionia before his time did not subjugate the cities, but raided and robbed them.
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley), Book 1, chapter 72 (search)
re the Persian rule were subjects of the Medes, and, at this time, of Cyrus. For the boundary of the Median and Lydian empires was the river Halys, which flows from the Armenian mountains first through Cilicia and afterwards between the Matieni on the right and the Phrygians on the other hand; then, passing these and still flowing north, it separates the Cappadocian Syrians on the right from the Paphlagonians on the left. Thus the Halys river cuts off nearly the whole of the lower part of Asia from the Cyprian to the Euxine sea. Here is the narrowest neck of all this land; the length of the journey across for a man traveling unencumbered is five days.th=s *)asi/hs ta\ ka/ta means here and elsewhere in Hdt. the western part of Asia, west of the Halys (Kizil Irmak). The width from sea to sea of the au)xh/n is obviously much underestimated by Hdt., as also by later writers; the actual distance at the narrowest part is about 280 miles as the crow flies; much more than a five days' march.
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