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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 80 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 20 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Diodorus Siculus, Library. You can also browse the collection for Pontus or search for Pontus in all documents.

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Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 2 (search)
Xerxes, vying with the zeal displayed by the Carthaginians, surpassed them in all his preparations to the degree that he excelled the Carthaginians in the multitude of peoples at his command. And he began to have ships built throughout all the territory along the sea that was subject to him, both Egypt and Phoenicia and Cyprus, Cilicia and Pamphylia and Pisidia, and also Lycia, Caria, Mysia, the Troad, and the cities on the Hellespont, and Bithynia, and Pontus. Spending a period of three years, as did the Carthaginians, on his preparations, he made ready more than twelve hundred warships. He was aided in this by his father Darius, who before his death had made preparations of great armaments; for Darius, after Datis, his general, had been defeated by the Athenians at Marathon, had continued to be angry with the Athenians for having won that battle. But Darius, when already about to cross overi.e. from Asia into Europe via the N
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XI, Chapter 3 (search)
ships, the Ionians, together with the Chians and Samians, one hundred, the Aeolians, together with the Lesbians and Tenedans, forty, the peoples of the region of the Hellespont, together with those who dwelt along the shores of the Pontus, eighty, and the inhabitants of the islands fifty; for the king had won over to his side the islands lying within the Cyanean RocksAt the entrance to the Black Sea; Triopium and Sunium are the promontories of Caria and Attica res inhabitants of the islands fifty; for the king had won over to his side the islands lying within the Cyanean RocksAt the entrance to the Black Sea; Triopium and Sunium are the promontories of Caria and Attica respectively. and Triopium and Sunium. Triremes made up the multitude we have listed, and the transports for the cavalry numbered eight hundred and fifty, and the triaconters three thousand. Xerxes, then, was busied with the enumeration of the armaments at Doriscus.
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 4 (search)
was Callias the son of Hipponicus; and so the Athenians and their allies concluded with the Persians a treaty of peace, the principal terms of which run as follows: All the Greeks cities of Asia are to live under laws of their own making; the satraps of the Persians are not to come nearer to the sea than a three days' journey and no Persian warship is to sail inside of PhaselisA city of Lycia on the Pamphylian Gulf. or the Cyanean RocksAt the entrance to the Black Sea at Byzantium.; and if these terms are observed by the king and his generals, the Athenians are not to send troops into the territory over which the king is ruler.There was a cessation of hostilities at this time between Athens and Persia; but the specific terms of the treaty, as they are stated here and in fourth-century orators, are clearly false. See Walker in Camb. Anc. Hist. 5, pp. 87-88, 469-471. After the treaty had been solemnly concluded, the Athen
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XII, Chapter 72 (search)
s who were in possession of Mytilene. Exasperated by this state of affairs the Athenian people sent against them as generals Aristeides and Symmachus with an army. They put in at Lesbos and by means of sustained assaults took possession of Antandrus, and of the exiles some they put to death and others they expelled from the city; then they left a garrison to guard the place and sailed away from Lesbos. After this Lamachus the general sailed with ten triremes into the Pontus and anchored at Heracleia,More accurately, with Thuc. 4.75.2, "in the territory of Heracleia," since the city lay on the Lycus, not the Cales, River. on the river Cales, as it is called, but he lost all his ships; for when heavy rains fell, the river brought down so violent a current that his vessels were driven on certain rocky places and broken to pieces on the bank. The Athenians concluded a truce with the Lacedaemonians for a year, on the terms that both of them shou
Diodorus Siculus, Library, Book XIII, Chapter 64 (search)
Ephesians joined in the fighting, four hundred Athenians were slain and the remainder ThrasybulusCp. sect. 1, first note. took aboard his ships and sailed off to Lesbos. The Athenian generals who were in the neighbourhood of Cyzicus, sailing to Chalcedon,On the Hellespont opposite Byzantium. established there the fortress of Chrysopolis and left an adequate force behind; and the officers in charge they ordered to collect a tenth from all merchants sailing out of the Pontus. After this they divided their forces and Theramenes was left behind with fifty ships with which to lay siege to Chalcedon and Byzantium, and Thrasybulus was sent to Thrace, where he brought the cities in those regions over to the Athenians. And Alcibiades, after giving ThrasybulusCp. sect. 1, first note. a separate commandEditors have been troubled by a)polu/sas, here translated as "give a separate command," by pressing the meaning of the word in the s