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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 80 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 76 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 20 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 16 0 Browse Search
Vitruvius Pollio, The Ten Books on Architecture (ed. Morris Hicky Morgan) 16 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 12 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, Three orations on the Agrarian law, the four against Catiline, the orations for Rabirius, Murena, Sylla, Archias, Flaccus, Scaurus, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 12 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 10 0 Browse Search
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill) 10 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 8 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson). You can also browse the collection for Pontus or search for Pontus in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 5 document sections:

Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 4, chapter 8 (search)
seemed like crazy, or even, in some cases, dying men. So they lay there in great numbers as though the army had suffered a defeat, and great despondency prevailed. On the next day, however, no one had died, and at approximately the same hour as they had eaten the honey they began to come to their senses; and on the third or fourth day they got up, as if from a drugging. From there they marched two stages, seven parasangs, and reached the sea at Trapezus, an inhabited Greek city on the Euxine Sea, a colony of the Sinopeans in the territory of Colchis. There they remained about thirty days in the villages of the Colchians, and from these as a base plundered Colchis. And the Trapezuntians supplied a market for the army, received the Greeks kindly, and gave them oxen, barley-meal, and wine as gifts of hospitality. They likewise took part in negotiations with the Greeks in behalf of the near-by Colchians, who dwelt for the most part on the plain, and from these people also the Greeks r
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 5, chapter 1 (search)
The MSS. here prefix the following summary of the preceding narrative.[The preceding narrative has described all that the Greeks did on their upward march with Cyrus and on their journey to the shore of the Euxine Sea, how they arrived at the Greek city of Trapezus, and how they paid the thankofferings for deliverance which they had vowed to sacrifice at the place where they should first reach a friendly land.] After this they gathered together and proceeded to take counsel in regard to the remainder of their journey; and the first man to get up was Leon of Thurii, who spoke as follows: “Well, I, for my part, gentlemen,” he said, “am tired by this time of packing up and walking and running and carrying my arms and being in line and standing guard and fighting, and what I long for now is to be rid of these toils, since we have the sea, and to sail the rest of the way, and so reach Greece stretched out on my back, like Odysseus.”See Hom. Od. 5.75-118. Upon hearing these words the soldie
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 5, chapter 6 (search)
, and likewise upon a great body of peltasts, bowmen, slingers, and horsemen also, all of them now exceedingly efficient through constant service and all there in Pontus,Xenophon uses the term Po/ntos both of the Euxine Sea and of the region along its south-eastern coast. See below. where so large a force could not have been gatheEuxine Sea and of the region along its south-eastern coast. See below. where so large a force could not have been gathered by any slight outlay of money, it seemed to him that it was a fine thing to gain additional territory and power for Greece by founding a city. It would become a great city, he thought, as he reckoned up their own numbers and the peoples who dwelt around the Euxine. And with a view to this project, before speaking about it to a if they did not provide pay for the troops so that they would have provisions for the voyage from Cotyora, there would be danger of that great force remaining in Pontus. “For Xenophon,” they went on, “wishes and is urging that as soon as the ships come, we should then say all of a sudden to the army: `Soldiers, now we see that yo<
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 1 (search)
The MSS. here prefix the following summary of the preceding narrative.[The preceding narrative has described all that the Greeks did on their upward march with Cyrus until the time of the battle, all that took place after the death of Cyrus on their journey to the Euxine Sea, and the whole course of their doings while they were travelling on, by land and water, from the Euxine, until they got beyond its mouth, arriving at Chrysopolis, in Asia.] After this Pharnabazus, in fear that the Greek army might carry on a campaign against his own land, sent to Anaxibius, the admiral, who chanced to be at Byzantium, and asked him to carry the army acrossThe Bosporus. Chrysopolis was directly opposite Byzantium. out of Asia, promising to do everything for him that might be needful. Anaxibius accordingly summoned the generals and captains to Byzantium, and gave them promises that if they crossed over, the soldiers would have regular pay. The rest of the officers replied that they would consider the
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson), Book 7, chapter 5 (search)
f Heracleides, in wanting to make him an object of suspicion to the other generals, brought with him when he came all the generals and the captains. When all of them had been prevailed upon, they continued the march with Seuthes, and, keeping the Pontus upon the right through the country of the millet-eating Thracians, as they are called, arrived at Salmydessus. Here many vessels sailing to the Pontus run aground and are wrecked; for there are shoals that extend far and wide. And the Thracians wPontus run aground and are wrecked; for there are shoals that extend far and wide. And the Thracians who dwell on this coast have boundary stones set up and each group of them plunder the ships that are wrecked within their own limits; but in earlier days, before they fixed the boundaries, it was said that in the course of their plundering many of them used to be killed by one another. Here there were found great numbers of beds and boxes, quantities of written books, and an abundance of all the other articles that shipowners carry in wooden chests. After subduing the country in this neighbourho