hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
World English Bible (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901) 6 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 4 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 18 results in 7 document sections:

Exodus (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901), chapter 16 (search)
They took their journey from Elim, and all the congregation of the children of Israel came to the wilderness of Sin, which is between Elim and Sinai, on the fifteenth day of the second month after their departing out of the land of Egypt. The whole congregation of the children of Israel murmured against Moses and against Aaron in the wilderness; and the children of Israel said to them, "We wish that we had died by the hand of Yahweh in the land of Egypt, when we sat by the flesh-pots, when we ate our fill of bread, for you have brought us out into this wilderness, to kill this whole assembly with hunger." Then said Yahweh to Moses, "Behold, I will rain bread from the sky for you, and the people shall go out and gather a day's portion every day, that I may test them, whether they will walk in my law, or not. It shall come to pass on the sixth day, that they shall prepare that which they bring in, and it shall be twice as much as they gather daily." Moses and A
Exodus (ed. Rainbow Missions, Inc., Rainbow Missions, Inc.; revision of the American Standard Version of 1901), chapter 19 (search)
In the third month after the children of Israel had gone forth out of the land of Egypt, on that same day they came into the wilderness of Sinai. When they had departed from Rephidim, and had come to the wilderness of Sinai, they encamped in the wilderness; and there Israel encamped before the mountain. Moses went up to God, and Yahweh called to him out of the mountain, saying, "This is what you shall tell the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel: 'You have seen what I diSinai, they encamped in the wilderness; and there Israel encamped before the mountain. Moses went up to God, and Yahweh called to him out of the mountain, saying, "This is what you shall tell the house of Jacob, and tell the children of Israel: 'You have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles' wings, and brought you to myself. Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice, and keep my covenant, then you shall be my own possession from among all peoples; for all the earth is mine; and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests, and a holy nation.' These are the words which you shall speak to the children of Israel." Moses came and called for the elders of the people, and set before them all these words which Yahweh commanded
tion. The shoes of the ancient Egyptians were made of papyrus, leather, or textile fabrics. The upper was sewed to the sole, but an examination of a number of shoes of that ancient people has failed to reveal a heel. The Chinese and the inhabitants of India have had shoes from time immemorial. Skins, silk, rushes, linen, wool, wood, bark, and metal have been used by these Orientals. The Homeric heroes are represented without shoes. Moses wore sandals or shoes in the wilderness of Sinai. The early Greeks and Romans used them but little; succeeding ages introduced foot coverings of various kinds: the sandal with latchet; the same with a toe-piece or cap; a leather moccasin, or soleless shoe; a shoe in which the toes are exposed (Fig. 4557, e); a shoe, as we understand it; slippers; boots; buskins, etc., etc. The material was of tanned or tawed skins. Homer, Ovid, and Pliny agree in celebrating the skill of Tychius, the Boeotian, in the art of shoemaking. The latter
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Poems Subjective and Reminiscent (search)
re reward of holiness, And dread rebuke of sin. A light, a guide, a warning, A presence ever near, Through the deep silence of the flesh I reach the inward ear. My Gerizim and Ebal Are in each human soul, The still, small voice of blessing, And Sinai's thunder-roll. The stern behest of duty, The doom-book open thrown, The heaven ye seek, the hell ye fear, Are with yourselves alone. “ A gold and purple sunset Flowed down the broad Moselle; On hills of vine and meadow lands The peace of twil holiest name? Did his own heart, loving and human, The God of his worship shame? And lo! from the bloom and greenness, From the tender skies above, And the face of his little daughter, He read a lesson of love. No more as the cloudy terror Of Sinai's mount of law, But as Christ in the Syrian lilies The vision of God he saw. And, as when, in the clefts of Horeb, Of old was His presence known, The dread Ineffable Glory Was Infinite Goodness alone. Thereafter his hearers noted In his prayer
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Anti-Slavery Poems (search)
with his life of devotion to the same cause. the storm and peril overpast, The hounding hatred shamed and still, Go, soul of freedom! take at last The place which thou alone canst fill. Confirm the lesson taught of old— Life saved for self is lost, while they Who lose it in His service hold The lease of God's eternal day. Not for thyself, but for the slave Thy words of thunder shook the world; No selfish griefs or hatred gave The strength wherewith thy bolts were hurled. From lips that Sinai's trumpet blew We heard a tender under song; Thy very wrath from pity grew, From love of man thy hate of wrong. Now past and present are as one; The life below is life above; Thy mortal years have but begun Thy immortality of love. With somewhat of thy lofty faith We lay thy outworn garment by, Give death but what belongs to death, And life the life that cannot die! Not for a soul like thine the calm Of selfish ease and joys of sense; But duty, more than crown or palm, Its own exceeding
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Appendix (search)
faithful to his home and hearth, Even 'midst the scornful stranger band His boast shall be of Yankee land. What State Street said to South Carolina, and what South Carolina said to State Street. [Published in The National Era, May 22, 1851.] Muttering ‘fine upland staple,’ prime ‘Sea Island finer,’ With cotton bales pictured on either retina, ‘Your pardon!’ said State Street to South Carolina; “We feel and acknowledge your laws are diviner Than any promulgated by the thunders of Sinai! Sorely pricked in the sensitive conscience of business We own and repent of our sins of remissness: Our honor we've yielded, our words we have swallowed; And quenching the lights which our forefathers followed, And turning from graves by their memories hallowed, With teeth on ball-cartridge, and finger on trigger, Reversed Boston Notions, and sent back a nigger!” ‘Get away!’ cried the Chivalry, busy a-drumming, And fifing and drilling, and such Quattle-bumming; “With your
iest glimpses of Egyptian history exhibit pictures of bondage; the oldest monuments of human labor on the Egyptian soil are evidently the results of slave labor. The founder of the Jewish nation was a slave-holder and a purchaser of slaves. Every patriarch was lord in his own household. Gen. XII. 16; XVII. 12; XXXVII. 28. The Hebrews, when they burst the bands of their Chap. V.} own thraldom, carried with them beyond the desert the institution of slavery. The light that broke from Sinai scattered the corrupting illusions of polytheism; but slavery planted itself even in the promised land, on the banks of Siloa, near the oracles of God. The Hebrew father might doom his daughter to bondage; the wife, and children, and posterity of the emancipated slave, remained the property of the master and his heirs; and if a slave, though mortally wounded by his master, did but languish of his wounds for a day, the owner escaped with impunity; for the slave was his master's money. It is