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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 440 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 184 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 52 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 48 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 30 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 20 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 14 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 10 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 8 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 8 0 Browse Search
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Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
's abstract, opened with the deliberations of the Trojans about the Wooden Horse, and from the similarity of the abstract to the text of Apollodorus we may infer that our author followed Arctinus generally, though not in all details; for instance, he differed from Arctinus in regard to the affair of Laocoon and his sons. See below. With the stratagem of the Wooden Horse we may compare the stratagem by which, in the war of Independence waged by the United Provinces against Spain, Prince Maurice contrived to make himself master of Breda. The city was then held by a Spanish garrison, which received its supply of fuel by boats. The master of one of these boats, Adrian Vandenberg by name, noticed that in the absence of the governor there was great negligence in conducting the examination to which all boats were subjected before they were allowed to enter the town. This suggested to Vandenberg a plan for taking the
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Libellus de politica conservatia Maris. Or, The Pollicy of keeping the Sea. (search)
then all the other rowte. Kept then the see, shippes should not bring ne fetch, And then the carreys wold not thidre stretch: And so those marts wold full evill thee, If we manly kept about the see. Of the commodities of Brabant and Zeland and Henauld and marchandy carried by land to the martes. Cap. 8. YET marchandy of Brabant and Zeland The Madre and Woad, that dyers take on hand To dyen with, Garlike and Onions, And saltfishe als for husband and commons. But they of Holland at Caleis byen our felles, And wolles our, that Englishmen hem selles. And the chaffare that Englishmen doe byen In the marts, that noe man may denien, Is not made in Brabant that cuntree: It commeth from out of Henauld, not by see, But al by land, by carts, and from France, Bourgoyne, Colein, Cameret in substance, Therefore at marts if there be a restraint, Men seyne plainely that list no fables paynt, If Englishmen be withdrawen away, Is great rebuke and losse to her affray:
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Of the commodities of Brabant and Zeland and Henauld and marchandy carried by land to the martes. Cap. 8. (search)
Of the commodities of Brabant and Zeland and Henauld and marchandy carried by land to the martes. Cap. 8. YET marchandy of Brabant and Zeland The Madre and Woad, that dyers take on hand To dyen with, Garlike and Onions, And saltfishe als for husband and commons. But they of Holland at Caleis byen our felles, And wolles our, that Englishmen hem selles. And the chaffare that Englishmen doe byen In the marts, that noe man may denien, Is not made in Brabant that cuntree: It commeth from out of Henauld, not by see, But al by land, by carts, and from France, Bourgoyne, Colein, Cameret in substance, Therefore at marts if there be a restraint, Men seyne plainely that list no fables paynt, If Englishmen be withdrawen away, Is great rebuke and losse to her affray: As though we sent into the land of France Ten thousand people, men of good puissance, To werre unto her hindring multifarie, So ben our English marchants necessarie. If it be thus assay, and we shall witten
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A large Charter granted by K. Edward the 4 in the second yere of his reigne, to the marchants of England resident especially in the Netherland, for their chusing of a master and governor among themselves, which governement was first appointed unto one William Obray: with expresse mention, what authoritie he should have. (search)
erved among our saide subjects, which abide, frequent, converse, remain, inhabit, & passe, aswel by sea as by land, into ye parts of Brabant , Flanders, Henault, Holland , Zeland, and divers other countreis & seigneuries belonging aswell to the high and mighty prince, our most deere and loving cousin ye Duke of Burgoine, of Brabanhave over our said common subjects the marchants travailing hereafter as wel by sea as by land, and abiding in the said countries of Brabant , Flanders, Henault, Holland , Zeland, and other countreis beyond the sea, as is aforesaide, together with the wages, rights, profits, and emoluments heretofore accustomed, & as the said Willcts the common marchants & mariners comming, remaining, frequenting, passing, & repairing from henceforth into the said countreis of Brabant , Flanders, Henault, Holland , Zeland, and other countreyes beyond the sea, as it is said, and to keep and cause to be kept, to exercise and maintein, for us and in our place, the said office
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The coines, weights and measures used in Russia , written by John Hasse, in the yere, 1554. (search)
and his court. The Emperour is a great marchant himselfe of waxe and sables, which with good foresight may bee procured to their hands: as for other commodities there are litle or none in Moscovia, besides those above rehearsed: if there bee other, it is brought thither by the Turkes, who will be daintie to buy our clothes considering the charges of cariage over land. Our marchants may doe well to provide for the Russes such wares as the Dutch nation doeth serve them of, as Flanders and Holland clothes, which I beleeve, they shal serve better and with lesse charge then they of Rye or Dorpt, or Revel: for it is no smal adventure to bring their clothes out of Flanders to either of these places, and their charge not litle to cary them over lande to Novogrode, which is from Rye nine hundred Russian miles. This Novogrode is a place wel furnished with flaxe, Waxe, Hides, tallow and many other things: the best flaxe in Russia is brought thither and there sold by the hundred bundles,
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The thirde voyage into Persia, begun in the yeere 1565. by Richard Johnson, Alexander Kitchin, and Arthur Edwards. (search)
with 10. or 12. targets of steele, being good. Item, ten or twelve good shirts of male being very good or else none, that may abide the shot of an arrow, and two buffe jerkins. Item, ten or-twelve pieces of Westerne karsies, being thicked well and close shut in the weaving, and died into scarlets and fine reds. I thinke there wil be no such cloth for noblemens caps. The prince named them karangies, saying, that maidens did make them, & is desirous of them. Item, six pieces of fine Holland cloth for the Prince, with some other for noblemen, of a lower price. Item, twentie handguns being good, some of them with fire locks, and also six good dags, with locks to travel withall. Item 100. brusshes for garments (none made of swines haire,) for gifts, and otherwise to be sold. Item, six stone bowes that shoot lead pellets. Item, a mill to grind corne in the field as they goe, finely devised: for Cozomomet willed me to write for one to be sent, to give the Prince. Ite
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, These bee the names of the wares or commodities, which on the backe side of one of his letters the Shaugh hath written to you to be sent him. (search)
with 10. or 12. targets of steele, being good. Item, ten or twelve good shirts of male being very good or else none, that may abide the shot of an arrow, and two buffe jerkins. Item, ten or-twelve pieces of Westerne karsies, being thicked well and close shut in the weaving, and died into scarlets and fine reds. I thinke there wil be no such cloth for noblemens caps. The prince named them karangies, saying, that maidens did make them, & is desirous of them. Item, six pieces of fine Holland cloth for the Prince, with some other for noblemen, of a lower price. Item, twentie handguns being good, some of them with fire locks, and also six good dags, with locks to travel withall. Item 100. brusshes for garments (none made of swines haire,) for gifts, and otherwise to be sold. Item, six stone bowes that shoot lead pellets. Item, a mill to grind corne in the field as they goe, finely devised: for Cozomomet willed me to write for one to be sent, to give the Prince. Ite
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The miraculous victory atchieved by the English Fleete, under the discreet and happy conduct of the right honourable, right prudent, and valiant lord, the L. Charles Howard, L. high Admirall of England, &c. Upon the Spanish huge Armada sent in the yeere 1588. for the invasion of England, together with the wofull and miserable successe of the said Armada afterward, upon the coasts of Norway , of the Scottish Westerne Isles, of Ireland , of Spaine, of France, and of England, &c. Recorded in Latine by Emanuel van Meteran in the 15. booke of his history of the low Countreys. (search)
he conquest of that Iland was lesse difficult then the conquest of Holland and Zeland. Moreover the Spaniards were of opinion, that it would e intreated with all humanitie and friendship. The provinces of Holland and Zeland, &c. giving credite unto their intelligence out of Spailie with that Valdez, which in the yeere 1574. besieged Leiden in Holland , were sent captives into England. There were in the sayd ship 55. yd Spanish Fleete for feare of five and thirtie warrelike ships of Holland and Zeland, which there kept watch and warde under the conduct of drinke, and other necessary victuals. Moreover, the shippes of Holland and Zeland stood continually in their sight, threatening shot and one of these shippes to be set up in the great Church of Leiden in Holland , which is of so great a length, that being fastened to the very roo, for the lasting memory of the same matter, they have stamped in Holland divers such like coines, according to the custome of the ancient R
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The voyage of Master Henry Austell by Venice and thence to Ragusa over land, and so to Constantinople: and from thence by Moldavia , Polonia , Silesia and Germanie to Hamburg, &c. (search)
The voyage of Master Henry Austell by Venice and thence to Ragusa over land, and so to Constantinople: and from thence by Moldavia , Polonia , Silesia and Germanie to Hamburg, &c. THE 9. of June we tooke shipping at Harewich and the next day landed at the Ramekins in the Isle of Walcheren with very stormy weather, and that night went to Middleburch in the same Island. The twelft we tooke shipping for Holland , and the 13. we landed at Schiedam : and the same day went to Delft by boat, and so that night to the Hage . The 17. we tooke shipping at Amsterdam , and the 18. we landed at Enckhuysen. The 19. we tooke shipping and by the Zuydersee we passed that day the Ulie, and so into the maine sea; And the next day we entred into the river of Hamburg called the Elbe . The 21. we came to anker in the same river before a towne of the bishop of Breme called Staden , where they pay a certaine toll, and specially for wine, and so that night wee landed at Hamburg, where we
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Neustat. The 3. day to dinner at Bamberg : and before wee came (search)
passed by a castle of the Marques of Brandenburg called Wolmerstat, and that night we lay at Garleben. The 25. wee lay at Soltwedel. The 26. at Berg . The 27. we baited at Lunenborg, that night we lay at Winson. The 28. we came to Hamborg, and there stayed one weeke. The 5. of December wee departed from Hamborg, and passed the Elbe by boate being much frosen, and from the river went on foote to Boxtchoede, being a long Dutch mile off, and there we lay; and from thence passed over land to Emden . Thence having passed through Friseland and Holland , the 25. being Christmas day in the morning we came to Delft : where wee found the right honourable the Earle of Leicester with a goodly company of Lords, knights, gentlemen, and souldiers. The 28. at night to Roterodam. The 29. to the Briel, and there stayed eight dayes for passage. The fifth of January we tooke shipping. The 7. we landed at Gravesend , and so that night at London with the helpe of almightie God.
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