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Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 8 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 6 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 4 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 4 0 Browse Search
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 64 (search)
He also proceeded as far as Samaria, where is now the city Sebaste, which was built by Herod the king, and encompassed it all round with a wall, and set his sons, Aristobulus and Antigonus, over the siege; who pushed it on so hard, that a famine so far prevailed within the city, that they were forced to eat what never was esteemed food. They also invited Antiochus, who was called Cyzicenus, to come to their assistance; whereupon he got ready, and complied with their invitation, but was beaten by Aristobulus and Antigonus; and indeed he was pursued as far as Scythopolis by these brethren, and fled away from them. So they returned back to Samaria, and shut the multitude again within the wall; and when they had taken the city, they demolished it, and made slaves of its inhabitants. And as they had still great success in their undertakings, they did not suffer their zeal to cool, but marched with an army as far as Scythopolis, and made an incursion upon it, and laid waste all the country
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 155 (search)
He also rebuilt Gadara, The coin of this Gadara, still extant, with its date from this era, is a certain evidence of this its rebuilding by Pompey, as Spanheim here assures us. that had been demolished by the Jews, in order to gratify one Demetrius, who was of Gadara, and was one of his own freed-men. He also made other cities free from their dominion, that lay in the midst of the country, such, I mean, as they had not demolished before that time; Hippos, and Scythopolis, as also Pella, and Samaria, and Marissa; and besides these Ashdod, and Jamnia, and Arethusa; and in like manner dealt he with the maritime cities, Gaza, and Joppa, and Dora, and that which was anciently called Strato's Tower, but was afterward rebuilt with the most magnificent edifices, and had its name changed to Cesarea, by king Herod. All which he restored to their own citizens, and put them under the province of Syria; which province, together with Judea, and the countries as far as Egypt and Euphrates, he commit
Flavius Josephus, The Wars of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book I, section 164 (search)
Now when Gabinius was come to Alexandrium, because he found a great many there en-camped, he tried, by promising them pardon for their former offenses, to induce them to come over to him before it came to a fight; but when they would hearken to no terms of accommodation, he slew a great number of them, and shut up a great number of them in the citadel. Now Marcus Antonius, their leader, signalized himself in this battle, who, as he always showed great courage, so did he never show it so much as now; but Gabinius, leaving forces to take the citadel, went away himself, and settled the cities that had not been demolished, and rebuilt those that had been destroyed. Accordingly, upon his injunctions, the following cities were restored: Scythopolis, and Samaria, and Anthedon, and Apollonia, and Jamnia, and Raphia, and Mariassa, and Adoreus, and Gamala, and Ashdod, and many others; while a great number of men readily ran to each of them, and became their inhabitants.
Flavius Josephus, The Life of Flavius Josephus (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), section 266 (search)
uctions to them, and while they were getting themselves ready as fast as they could, I sent them on this errand the third day after they had been assembled: I also sent five hundred armed men with them [as a guard]. I then wrote to my friends in Samaria, to take care that they might safely pass through the country: for Samaria was already under the Romans, and it was absolutely necessary for those that go quickly [to Jerusalem] to pass through that country; for in that road you may, in three da they might safely pass through the country: for Samaria was already under the Romans, and it was absolutely necessary for those that go quickly [to Jerusalem] to pass through that country; for in that road you may, in three days' time, go from Galilee to Jerusalem. I also went myself, and conducted the old men as far as the bounds of Galilee, and set guards in the roads, that it might not be easily known by any one that these men were gone. And when I had thus done, I went and abode at Japha.
Flavius Josephus, Against Apion (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), BOOK II, section 33 (search)
d not therefore get some of our nation to Alexandria, because he wanted inhabitants for this his city, on whose building he had bestowed so much pains; but this was given to our people as a reward, because he had, upon a careful trial, found them all to have been men of virtue and fidelity to him; for, as Hecateus says concerning us, "Alexander honored our nation to such a degree, that, for the equity and the fidelity which the Jews exhibited to him, he permitted them to hold the country of Samaria free from tribute. Of the same mind also was Ptolemy the son of Lagus, as to those Jews who dwelt at Alexandria." For he intrusted the fortresses of Egypt into their hands, as believing they would keep them faithfully and valiantly for him; and when he was desirous to secure the government of Cyrene, and the other cities of Libya, to himself, he sent a party of Jews to inhabit in them. And for his successor Ptolemy, who was called Philadelphus, he did not only set all those of our nation fr
Polybius, Histories, book 5, Continued Success of Antiochus (search)
was done, the garrison surrendered for want of water. Having thus got possession of Rabbatamana, Antiochus left Nicarchus with an adequate garrison in command of it; and sent the two deserters from Ptolemy, Hippolochus and Ceraeas, with five thousand infantry, to Samaria: with orders to take the government of the district and protect all who submitted to him.Samaria. Antiochus goes into winter quarters, B. C. 218-217.He then started with his army for Ptolemais, where he was resolved to winter. was done, the garrison surrendered for want of water. Having thus got possession of Rabbatamana, Antiochus left Nicarchus with an adequate garrison in command of it; and sent the two deserters from Ptolemy, Hippolochus and Ceraeas, with five thousand infantry, to Samaria: with orders to take the government of the district and protect all who submitted to him.Samaria. Antiochus goes into winter quarters, B. C. 218-217.He then started with his army for Ptolemais, where he was resolved to winter.
Siddhanta, or Sanskrit text-book of astronomy, translated for the American Oriental Society, and published in their journal, Vol. VI. Equatorial sun-dial (Benares). About 771 years before the Christian Era, the Assyrian king Phul invaded Samaria. Thirty-one years afterward, Pekah of Samaria besieged the young King Ahaz in Jerusalem, and the latter sent to Tiglath-Pileser, the Assyrian, then in Damascus, for help against his enemy. This was given. When Ahaz went to Damascus to greet Samaria besieged the young King Ahaz in Jerusalem, and the latter sent to Tiglath-Pileser, the Assyrian, then in Damascus, for help against his enemy. This was given. When Ahaz went to Damascus to greet his benefactor, he saw a beautiful altar, and sent working drawings of it to Urijah, the priest in Jerusalem. An altar was completed against his return. In the same spirit of enterprise and taste, and probably from the same trip of observation, he set up the dial which is mentioned in the account of the miraculous cure of his son Hezekiah, thirteen years after Ahaz was gathered to his fathers. This is perhaps the first dial on record, and is 140 years before Thales, and nearly 400 years befo
ut 600 B. C.) was considered the most ancient inscription of any length. Here we have a long specimen of the earliest Phoenician character, — the alphabet from which the Greek, the Roman, and all our European alphabets are derived. As Count de Vogue says, these are the very characters which, before 700 B. C., were common to all the races of Western Asia, from Egypt to the foot of the Taurus, and from the Mediterranean to Nineveh; which were used in Nineveh itself, in Phoenicia, Jerusalem, Samaria, the land of Moab, Cilicia, and Cyprus. It disproves the assertion of Aristotle and Pliny that Cadmus only brought 16 or 18 letters from the East into Greece, and that the Greeks invented the rest, for the whole of the 22 are found on this monumental stone. The Rosetta stone is of 700 years later date. It was found in 1798 by a French engineer in digging the foundations for a fort near the Rosetta mouth of the Nile. It is a tablet of basalt, with an inscription of the year 196 B. C.,
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 2. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Poems Subjective and Reminiscent (search)
l voice which came To Israel's prophet bards, Nor as the tongues of cloven flame, Nor gift of fearful words,— Not always thus, with outward sign Of fire or voice from Heaven, The message of a truth divine, The call of God is given! Awaking in the human heart Love for the true and right,— Zeal for the Christian's better part, Strength for the Christian's fight. Nor unto manhood's heart alone The holy influence steals: Warm with a rapture not its own, The heart of woman feels! As she who by Samaria's wall The Saviour's errand sought,— As those who with the fervent Paul And meek Aquila wrought: Or those meek ones whose martyrdom Rome's gathered grandeur saw: Or those who in their Alpine home Braved the Crusader's war, When the green Vaudois, trembling, heard, Through all its vales of death, The martyr's song of triumph poured From woman's failing breath. And gently, by a thousand things Which o'er our spirits pass, Like breezes o'er the harp's fine strings, Or vapors o'er a glass, L<
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 3. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier), Songs of Labour and Reform (search)
age of his generous youth. Election Day, 1841. The gallows. Written on reading pamphlets published by clergymen against the abolition of the gallows. I. the suns of eighteen centuries have shone Since the Redeemer walked with man, and made The fisher's boat, the cavern's floor of stone, And mountain moss, a pillow for His head; And He, who wandered with the peasant Jew, And broke with publicans the bread of shame, And drank with blessings, in His Father's name, The water which Samaria's outcast drew, Hath now His temples upon every shore, Altar and shrine and priest; and incense dim Evermore rising, with low prayer and hymn, From lips which press the temple's marble floor, Or kiss the gilded sign of the dread cross He bore, Ii. Yet as of old, when, meekly ‘doing good,’ He fed a blind and selfish multitude, And even the poor companions of His lot With their dim earthly vision knew Him not, How ill are His high teachings understood! Where He hath spoken Liberty, the p