hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 482 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation. You can also browse the collection for Ormus (Iran) or search for Ormus (Iran) in all documents.

Your search returned 241 results in 56 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A compendious and briefe declaration of the journey of M. Anth. Jenkinson, from the famous citie of London into the land of Persia, passing in this same journey thorow Russia , Moscovia, and Mare Caspium, alias Hircanum, sent and imployed therein by the right worshipfull Societie of the Merchants Adventurers, for discoverie of Lands, Islans, &c. Being begun the foureteenth day of May, Anno 1561, and in the third yere of the reigne of the Queenes Majestie that now is: this present declaration being directed and written to the foresayd Societie. (search)
sorting unto me divers gentlemen sent by the Sophie to conferre with me, especially touching the affaires of the Emperour of Russia, and to know by what way I intended to returne into my countrey, either by the way that I came, or by the way of Ormus, and so with the Portingals ships. Unto whom I answered, that I durst not returne by the way of Ormus, the Portingals and wee not being friendes, fully perceiving their meaning: for I was advertised that the saide Sophie meant to have warres withOrmus, the Portingals and wee not being friendes, fully perceiving their meaning: for I was advertised that the saide Sophie meant to have warres with the Portingals, and would have charged mee that I had bene come for a spie to passe through his dominions unto the saide Portingals, thinking them and us to be all one people, and calling all by the name of Franks, but by the providence of God this was prevented. After this the said Sophie conferred with his nobilitie and counsel concerning me, who perswaded that he should not entertaine me wel, neither dismisse me with letters or gifts, considering that I was a Franke, and of that nation
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The second voiage into Persia made by Tho. Alcock, who was slaine there, and by George Wrenne, & Ric. Cheinie servants to the worshipfull companie of Moscovie merchants in Anno 1563. written by the said Richard Cheinie. (search)
mong those heathen people. Therefore knowing my duetie which I have done, as a true servant ought to do, I beseech your worships (although I have but small recompence for my service,) yet let me have no wrong, and God will prosper you the better. Also, to informe your worships of your Persian voyage what I judge: it is a voyage to bee followed. The king of Gillan, whereas yet you have had no traffique, liveth al by marchandise: and it is neere Casbin, and not past six weekes travaile from Ormus, whither all the spices be brought: and here, (I meane at Gillan) a trade may be established: But your worships must send such men as are no riotous livers, nor drunkards. For if such men goe, it wil be to your dishonour and great hinderance, as appeared by experience the yeere 1565. when as Richard Johnson went to Persia, whose journey had bene better stayed then set forward. For whereas before wee had the name among those heathen people to be such marchants as they thought none like in al
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The thirde voyage into Persia, begun in the yeere 1565. by Richard Johnson, Alexander Kitchin, and Arthur Edwards. (search)
tale, and perceive the same to be true, and that all kind of wares come from thence into these parts. And from Casbin to Ormus, is about 30. daies travelling with camels. I have written the prices of wares in my letter to the governour both for spi. I doubt not but there will be profite and good done in spices, with drugs and other like in time. From Casbin to Ormus is six weeks travel, and from hence to Casbin is 16. dayes with camels laden: but if one travell with a good Mule unladen, it may be gone in seven or eight dayes. And I thinke to Ormus and other places, may be travelled in like order and proportion, with cattel unladen. But here in all places as men travel, they must carie their owne provision on horses, which they arr things, whatsoever should have chanced of me, I would then have become servant to mine Interpreter, and so have gone to Ormus and Aleppo, which both joyne on the borders of this countrey, being the chiefe Mart townes, whereunto from all places mer
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Another letter of the said M. Arthur Edwards, written the 26. of April 1566. in Shamaki in Media, to the right worshipful Sir Thomas Lodge Knight and Alderman: and in his absence to M. Thomas Nicols, Secretarie to the right worshipfull companie trading into Russia , Persia, and other the North and East partes, touching the successe of Richard Johnson in the third voiage into Persia. (search)
re to be sold. For there be the chiefe and best merchants, and divers other cities round about, to wit, Teveris, Ardouil, and Caishan, being the heart of the countrey, where there is more civilitie and merchants are better used. Concerning this point I have inquired of divers merchants both Russes and others that have bene in those parts, and found them all agreeing in one tale, and perceive the same to be true, and that all kind of wares come from thence into these parts. And from Casbin to Ormus, is about 30. daies travelling with camels. I have written the prices of wares in my letter to the governour both for spices and some drugs which I do know. Also you shall understand here is plentie of yew for bowstaves. I caused three horse loades to be bought us for to know the trueth: but they were cut out of season this moneth of April, the sap being in them. Three moneths I never left speaking to the Countrey men to bring some. Your Agent will send some home for example. This da
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, A letter of M. Arthur Edwards, written the 8. of August 1566. from the towne of Shamaki in Media, to the right worshipfull the Governours, Consuls, Assistants, and generalitie of the companie of Russia , &c. Shewing his accesse unto the Emperour of Persia, his conference with him, his obtaining of a priviledge, with divers other good observations. (search)
man. Sinamon for 40. Shaughs the batman. I doubt not but there will be profite and good done in spices, with drugs and other like in time. From Casbin to Ormus is six weeks travel, and from hence to Casbin is 16. dayes with camels laden: but if one travell with a good Mule unladen, it may be gone in seven or eight dayes. And I thinke to Ormus and other places, may be travelled in like order and proportion, with cattel unladen. But here in all places as men travel, they must carie their owne provision on horses, which they are to buy, and thus they travell but a footepase. The Shaugh himselfe is desirous to bargaine with you who will give money, have delivered our bils of debts and other things, whatsoever should have chanced of me, I would then have become servant to mine Interpreter, and so have gone to Ormus and Aleppo, which both joyne on the borders of this countrey, being the chiefe Mart townes, whereunto from all places merchants resort. And thus would I have spent
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fourth voyage into Persia, made by M. Arthur Edwards Agent, John Sparke, Laurence Chapman, Christopher Faucet, and Richard Pingle, in the yeere 1568. declared in this letter written from Casbin in Persia by the foresaide Laurence Chapman to a worshipfull merchant of the companie of Russia in London. Anno Domini 1569. Aprill 28. (search)
er in goodnesse nor yet in price to my content: neverthelesse, considering the colde sales which were there, as well for your karsies, as also the hot newes, that Ormuz way was shut up by occasion that the Indians do warre against them, which is true in deed: and againe the desire that the worshipfull hath to have such commoditieu11 may know whether all be true that hath bene written of this countrey people or not. I am informed by all the brokers in Teveris, that the way once open to Ormuz , from whence commeth no such store of spices as the worshipfull doeth looke for, that here will bee put a way in Teveris, some for money, and other some for bartetily purr posed of them, to bring us into trouble, which God defend us from. The price of spices be these, at this present enhansed by reason ye way is shut to Ormus, which when God shal send open, I purpose (God willing) to see, and at my returne to advertise the worshipful what benefit is there to be had in all points, so nee
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Notes concerning this fourth voyage into Persia, begun in the moneth of July 1568. gathered by M. Richard Willes from the mouth of Master Arthur Edwards, which was Agent in the same. (search)
uble them, and to stand in any Caravan where they will, or shal thinke good. THE commodities which the merchants may have by this trade into Persia are thought to bee great, and may in time perhaps be greater then the Portugals trade into ye East Indies, forasmuch as by the way of Persia into England, the returne may be made every yeere once: whereas the Portugals make the returne from Calecut but once in two yeeres, by a long and dangerous voiage all by sea: for where as the citie and Island of Ormus, lying in the gulfe of Persia, is the most famous Mart towne of all East India, whither al ye merchandises of India are brought, the same may in shorter time and more safely be brought by land and rivers through Persia, even unto the Caspian sea, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The Articles of the second priviledge delivered to Laurence Chapman, which are to be annexed unto the former priviledge. (search)
uble them, and to stand in any Caravan where they will, or shal thinke good. THE commodities which the merchants may have by this trade into Persia are thought to bee great, and may in time perhaps be greater then the Portugals trade into ye East Indies, forasmuch as by the way of Persia into England, the returne may be made every yeere once: whereas the Portugals make the returne from Calecut but once in two yeeres, by a long and dangerous voiage all by sea: for where as the citie and Island of Ormus, lying in the gulfe of Persia, is the most famous Mart towne of all East India, whither al ye merchandises of India are brought, the same may in shorter time and more safely be brought by land and rivers through Persia, even unto the Caspian sea, and from thence by the countreis of Russia or Moscovia by rivers, even unto the citie of Yeraslave, and from thence by land 180. miles to Vologda, and from thence againe all by water even unto England. The merchandises which be had out of
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, The fift voiage into Persia made by M. Thomas Banister, and master Geofrey Ducket, Agents for the Moscovie companie, begun from England in the yeere 1568. and continuing to the yeere 1574. following. Written by P. I. from the mouth of M. Lionel Plumtree. (search)
et had bene in person with the Shaugh, and had procured his order for the deliverie thereof. Lionel Plumtree, in the meane time that M. Ducket was at Casbin in sute for goods, upon the perswasion of certaine Bogharians, made provision for a journey to Cathaia, with cariages and commodities, and having all things ready, departed secretly with a Caravan: but being gone forwards on his way sixe days journy, some fifty horsemen by the procurement of Humfry Greensell (who afterwards being at Ormus in the East Indies, was there cruelly burnt in the Inquisition by the Portingals) were sent after him in poste from Soltan Erasbec, the Shaughs lieutenant, to fetch him backe againe, not suffering him to passe on so perillous and dangerous a journey for feare of divers inconveniences that might follow. After this M. Ducket returned from Casbin to Shamaky againe, and immediately made preparation for a journey to Cassan, being about foure dayes journey from Shamaky, and caried with him f
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation, Further observations concerning the state of Persia, taken in the foresayd fift voyage into those partes, and written by M. Geffrey Ducket, one of the Agents emploied in the same. (search)
Jerusalem, which they now call Couch Kaly. The most part of spices which commeth into Persia is brought from the Island of Ormus, situate in the gulfe of Persia called Sinus Persicus, betweene the maine land of Persia and Arabia , &c. The Portingals touch at Ormus both in their voyage to East India and homeward againe, and from thence bring all such spices as are occupied in Persia and the regions thereabout: for of pepper they bring very small quantitie, and that at a very deare price. The Turkes oftentimes bring pepper from Mecha in Arabia , which they sell as good cheape as that which is brought from Ormus. Silkes are brought from no place, but are wrought all in their owne countrey. Ormus is within two miles of the maine landOrmus is within two miles of the maine land of Persia, and the Portingals fetch their fresh water there, for the which they pay tribute to the Shaugh or king of Persia. Within Persia they have neither gold nor silver mines, yet have they coined money both of gold and silver, and also oth
1 2 3 4 5 6