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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
of the Ohio; and that whole army under General Buell was turned east along the Memphis & Charleston road, to march for Chattanooga. McClernand's reserve was turned west to Bolivar and Memphis. General Halleck took post himself at Corinth, assignede command he succeeded at Tupelo, with which he afterward fairly outmanoeuvred General Buell, and forced him back from Chattanooga to Louisville. It was a fatal mistake, however, that halted General Halleck at Corinth, and led him to disperse and schief, I surely expected of him immediate and important results. The Army of the Ohio was at the time marching toward Chattanooga, and was strung from Eastport by Huntsville to Bridgeport, under the command of General Buell. In like manner, the Aritary skill. General Bragg had reorganized the army of Beauregard at Tupelo, carried it rapidly and skillfully toward Chattanooga, whence he boldly assumed the offensive, moving straight for Nashville and Louisville, and compelling General Buell to
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
demand the continuance of the simple military rule, till after all the organized armies of the South are dispersed, conquered, and subjugated. The people of all this region are represented in the Army of Virginia, at Charleston, Mobile, and Chattanooga. They have sons and relations in each of the rebel armies, and naturally are interested in their fate. Though we hold military possession of the key-points of their country, still they contend, and naturally, that should Lee succeed in Virginia, or Bragg at Chattanooga, a change will occur here also. We cannot for this reason attempt to reconstruct parts of the South as we conquer it, till all idea of the establishment of a Southern Confederacy is abandoned. We should avail ourselves of the present lull to secure the strategical points that will give us an advantage in the future military movements, and we should treat the idea of civil government as one in which we as a nation have a minor or subordinate interest. The opportun
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
. When the latter had gained possession of Chattanooga he was directed not to move on Rome as he pher bridge was in course of construction at Chattanooga, under the immediate direction of Quarterma military division of the Mississippi, Chattanooga, Tennessee, November 25, 1863. Major-General Shere Hiawassee River, whereas none remained in Chattanooga. Accordingly, on the 29th of November, mhe wanted, we began our leisurely return to Chattanooga, which we reached on the 16th ; when Genera. Rawlins, Chief of Staff to General Grant, Chattanooga. General: For the first time, I am now a be seen the camps of the enemy, compassing Chattanooga and the line of Missionary Hills, with its new position with that of the main army in Chattanooga. lie left the three regiments attached temg's right, and returned to his own corps at Chattanooga. As night closed in, I ordered General Jefrrived with a letter from General Grant, at Chattanooga, informing me that the latest authentic acc[56 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
is headquarters to Nashville, Tennessee, leaving General George H. Thomas at Chattanooga, in command of the Department of the Cumberland, and of the army round aboutad, as auxiliary to the main line which led from Nashville to Stevenson, and Chattanooga. General John A. Logan had succeeded to the command of the Fifteenth Corps,I sent a communication to Admiral Porter, and dispatched to General Grant at Chattanooga, asking if he wanted me and Steele to cooperate with you against Shreveport;mpleted your best preparations, you go into battle without hesitation, as at Chattanooga — no doubts, no reserve; and I tell you that it was this that made us act wiyou, for you understand that we must reenforce the great army at the centre (Chattanooga) as much as possible, at the same time not risking the safety of any point oard Tuscaloosa, at the same time that we move from the Tennessee River about Chattanooga. I don't know as yet the grand strategy of the next campaign, but on arri
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
Chapter 15: Atlanta campaign-nashville and Chattanooga to Kenesaw. March, April, and May, 1864. the cars to Stevenson, Bridgeport, etc., to Chattanooga, where we spent a day or two with General Garmy commanders and myself were together at Chattanooga. We had nothing like a council of war, butcPherson to Huntsville, Thomas remaining at Chattanooga. On the 2d of April, at Nashville, I wrosumed the strength of the army to move from Chattanooga into Georgia at one hundred thousand men, aand thirty cars, of ten tons each, to reach Chattanooga daily, to be reasonably certain of an adequ98030596       Capt. G. M. Barber. Post of Chattanooga351831352555,1985,4533,981561,189  201,050  leveland, Thomas on the same objective from Chattanooga, and McPherson on Rome and Kingston from Guon's troops were brought forward rapidly to Chattanooga, partly by rail and partly by marching. Thced our lines in strong, compact order from Chattanooga to Big Shanty, nearly a hundred miles of as[11 mo
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, Chapter 16: Atlanta campaign-battles about Kenesaw Mountain. June, 1864. (search)
rike offensively from his right, he would have done a wise act, and I was compelled to presume that such was his object. We were also so far from Nashville and Chattanooga that we were naturally sensitive for the safety of our railroad and depots, so that the left (McPherson) was held very strong. About this time came reports that a large cavalry force of the enemy had passed around our left flank, evidently to strike this very railroad somewhere below Chattanooga. I therefore reenforced the cavalry stationed from Resaca to Cassville, and ordered forward from Huntsville, Alabama, the infantry division of General John E. Smith, to hold Kingston securely.ved him more gently than the occasion demanded, and from that time he began to sulk. General Hooker had come from the East with great fame as a fighter, and at Chattanooga he was glorified by his battle above the clouds, which I fear turned his head. He seemed jealous of all the army commanders, because in years, former rank, and
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
too hot to be endured. I have sent back to Chattanooga for two thirty-pound Parrotts, with which ws and traders were waiting at Nashville and Chattanooga, greedy to reach Atlanta with their wares ay), should be permitted to come nearer than Chattanooga; and, moreover, I peremptorily required tha been sent back by cars, but had not passed Chattanooga. These I ordered back, and offered Generalor is with it now. There are a few guarding Chattanooga, which General Steedman sent at one time towton's division of the Fourth Corps back to Chattanooga, and Corse's division of the Seventeenth Cohville, Granger at Decatur, and Steadman at Chattanooga, to adopt the most active measures to proteof General Sherman's immediate command from Chattanooga to Atlanta as follows: Killed, 4,423; woundof General Sherman's immediate command from Chattanooga to Atlanta as follows: Killed, 4,423; woundof General Sherman's immediate command from Chattanooga to Atlanta as follows: Killed, 4,423; wound[5 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 21 (search)
nth), were sent back by rail, the former to Chattanooga, and the latter to Rome. On the 25th I telelief. I have sent Newton's division up to Chattanooga in cars, and will send another division to will ten. I have sent two divisions up to Chattanooga and one to Rome, and General Thomas startedngston, Rome, Resaca, Dalton, Ringgold, and Chattanooga. All the important bridges were likewise p under Colonel W. W. Wright, came down from Chattanooga with iron, spikes, etc., and in about sevend at Dalton, Hood was compelled to go on to Chattanooga and Bridgeport, or to pass around by Decatut forts that already covered Nashville. At Chattanooga, he had General Steedman's division, about ps was ordered from Gaylesville to march to Chattanooga, and thence report for orders to General Th railroad to his rear and as far forward as Chattanooga. And, moreover, I was more than convinced Fourth Corps (Stanley) had already reached Chattanooga, and had been transported by rail to Pulask[19 more...]
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 22 (search)
as been abandoned, and so have all the roads, except the main one leading to Chattanooga. Part of this falling back was undoubtedly necessary, and all of it may haver General A. J. Smith, long absent and long expected; and he had drawn from Chattanooga and Decatur (Alabama) the divisions of Steedman and of R. S. Granger. Thesel Thomas had furthermore held fast to the railroad leading from Nashville to Chattanooga, leaving strong guards at its principal points, as at Murfreesboroa, Deckerd, Stevenson, Bridgeport, Whitesides, and Chattanooga. At Murfreesboroa the division of Rousseau was reenforced and strengthened up to about eight thousand men. Aeorgia and Tennessee, as well as the local garrisons of Decatur, Bridgeport, Chattanooga, and Murfreesboroa, are alike entitled to the common honors, and each regimeis command, for their gallantry and good conduct in their late campaign from Chattanooga to Atlanta, and the triumphal march thence through Georgia to Savannah, term
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 23 (search)
It is not necessary to storm Goldsboroa, because it is in a distant region, of no importance in itself, and, if its garrison is forced to draw supplies from its north, it will be eating up the same stores on which Lee depends for his command. I have no doubt Hood will bring his army to Augusta. Canby and Thomas should penetrate Alabama as far as possible, to keep employed at least a part of Hood's army; or, what would accomplish the same thing, Thomas might reoccupy the railroad from Chattanooga forward to the Etowah, viz., Rome, Kingston, and Allatoona, thereby threatening Georgia. I know that the Georgia troops are disaffected. At Savannah I met delegates from several counties of the southwest, who manifested a decidedly hostile spirit to the Confederate cause. I nursed the feeling as far as possible, and instructed Grover to keep it up. My left wing must now be at Sister's Ferry, crossing the Savannah River to the east bank. Slocum has orders to be at Robertsville to-mo
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