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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 1: (search)
orders of the United States, must be withdrawn. The arsenal, situated near Augusta, consisting of a group of buildings on the summits of salubrious sand-hills, cdepartment. It was injudicious and impolitic, added much to the excitement in Augusta, and was very nigh producing serious difficulties in this quarter, the people e following complete report of the surrender of the United States arsenal at Augusta, Ga.: On the morning of the 23d of January I received from the governor of Georgia, then in Augusta, backed by a superior force of State troops numbering some 600 or 700, a verbal demand of the arsenal, which I refused. Shortly after came thrcellency the governor of Georgia, having demanded the United States arsenal at Augusta, commanded by Capt. Arnold Elzey, Second artillery, United States army, the foers of the city were put under arms, and others came in from the country. The Augusta volunteers engaged in the capture of the arsenal consisted of the following co
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
thern Rights Guards (C), Perry, Capt. John A. Houser Oglethorpe Infantry (D), Augusta, Capt. Houghton B. Adam (who succeeded J. O. Clark on the latter's election aselected from the ranks of the company from Forsyth Walker Light Infantry (I), Augusta, Capt. Samuel H. Crump Quitman Guards (K), Forsyth, Capt. J. S. Pinkard (thesGreenbrier River, Bath and Hancock. Four companies re-enlisted in a body at Augusta, Ga., forming an artillery battalion under Maj. H. D. Capers. These were the Oglethorpe Artillery, Augusta, Capt. J. V. H. Allen; Walker Light Artillery, Augusta, Capt. Samuel Crump; Washington Artillery, Sandersville, Capt. J. W. Rudisill, and Augusta, Capt. Samuel Crump; Washington Artillery, Sandersville, Capt. J. W. Rudisill, and Newnan Artillery, Capt. George M. Hanvey. Three of these companies served under Gen. Kirby Smith in 1862, in east Tennessee, and the company from Newnan participated the First and Second Georgia infantry battalions, the Washington artillery of Augusta, Hardaway battery of Columbus, the Chatham battery of Savannah, and a large nu
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ng of 1861, found the city and navy yard in the hands of a small force under General Bragg. These Georgia commands were Ramsey's First Georgia regiment, Villepigue's First Georgia battalion, Capt. Isadore P. Girardey's Washington artillery from Augusta, and the Fifth Georgia regiment. After being in camp and on duty near Fort Barrancas for six weeks the First Georgia, about the 1st of June, was ordered to Virginia. The services of this regiment in that State have already been described. Theansferred to another field, he asked that the Fifth Georgia might be one of the regiments to accompany him, and that Col. J. K. Jackson be promoted to brigade command. In February, 1862, the Fifth was sent to Knoxville, and in the following May, Pensacola and its defenses were abandoned by the Confederates. Capt. I. P. Girardey's battery (the Washington artillery of Augusta) and the Thirty-sixth Georgia regiment, formerly Villepigue's First Georgia battalion, also accompanied General Bragg.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
ty burned than surrendered. He directed General Jackson to call out such of the militia force of Savannah as he could arm for imperative service, in addition to the State troops already in the field. Considerable apprehension for the safety of Augusta in the contingency of the capture of Savannah was felt, and General Lee authorized the obstruction of the river below Augusta, and the erection of a battery to protect the works. On February 17th Col. Charles H. Olmstead, of the First volunteAugusta, and the erection of a battery to protect the works. On February 17th Col. Charles H. Olmstead, of the First volunteer regiment of Georgia, commanding at Fort Pulaski, was notified by General Lee that the position taken in his rear by the enemy would require him to protect himself in that direction. As far as possible, said Lee, your safety will be anxiously cared for, and for the present your communication with the city will have to be by light boats over the marsh and through Wilmington narrows to Causton's bluffs, or by any other mode by which you can better accomplish it. It was a feature of the siege
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: (search)
ordered Col. Archibald Gracie, of the Forty-third Alabama, to take a force of infantry and march against a band of east Tennessee Unionists, who had assembled under Col. William Clift near Huntsville, Scott county. He was to have the co-operation of 300 cavalry, under Capt. T. M. Nelson, of Georgia. Gracie's force included some companies that had belonged to Ramsey's First Georgia. After the expiration of the twelve months for which that regiment had enlisted, it had been mustered out at Augusta. Four of the companies re-enlisted and formed the Twelfth Georgia battalion under Maj. H. D. Capers. On the way to Tennessee most of the horses were killed in a railroad accident. Only one company, the Newnan artillery, under Capt. G. M. Hanvey, was supplied with cannon, and this went into Kentucky with Heth's division. The other three, serving as infantry, marched with Gracie to Scott county. On August 13th, Gracie's command stormed and captured Fort Clift, scattering the Tennessee Un
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: (search)
he campaign of the Carolinas, surrendering with J. E. Johnston. Its colonel, J. T. McConnell, died from wounds received in action, and was succeeded by Lieutenant-Colonel Jackson. Captain Brady was killed. Captain Osborne died at his home in Augusta, Ga., from sickness contracted during the siege of Vicksburg, being not yet twenty-one years of age. The Fortieth regiment Georgia volunteers had the following officers: Col. Abda Johnson, Lieut.-Col. Robert M. Young, Maj. Raleigh G. Camp, Adjt.rant, (F) G. W. Austin, (G) W. H. Hartnett, (H) J. H. Powell, (I) J. Whately, (K) J. D. Watson, served during the campaign of 1864, especially in the defense of Savannah during Sherman's march to the sea. The First battalion Georgia reserves, Augusta fire brigade, was commanded by Lieut.-Col. C. A. Platt, Maj. C. B. Day. The captains were: (A) C. W. Hersey, (B) J. D. Butt, (C) C. B. Day, (D) J. Henry, (E) J. C. Moore, (F) J. W. Adams. The Atlanta Fire battalion, Lieut.-Col. G. W. Lee, Ma
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
ted to approach. In spite of these terrible reverses, a fifth and a sixth charge were made before night came to end the terrible slaughter. The musketry alone killed and wounded about 5,000, to which the artillery added enough to make 7,000 maimed, dead and dying, lying on that horrible field of destruction. General McLaws has written that about 1 p. m. General Cobb reported that he was short of ammunition. I sent his own very intelligent and brave courier, little Johnny Clark, from Augusta, Ga., to bring up his ordnance supplies, and directed General Kershaw to reinforce General Cobb with two of his South Carolina regiments, and I also sent the Sixteenth Georgia, which had been detached, to report to General Cobb. General McLaws also tells how a Georgia boy, William Crumley, an orderly of General Kershaw, seeing his chief's horse in a very dangerous position, rode the animal up a slope, exposed to the hottest fire of the enemy, left him in a safe place, and returning by the sam
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 11: (search)
youngest officer of his rank in the Thirty-ninth Georgia, not yet twenty-one years old, was particularly distinguished by the courage and skill displayed in holding his company together and securing their orderly withdrawal, for which he was complimented by General Cumming on the field. During the subsequent siege he showed remarkable skill in the construction of the part of the line under his supervision. This promising young officer died soon after the fall of Vicksburg at his home in Augusta, Ga., and at his funeral a great outpouring of citizens honored his memory. During the siege of Vicksburg, soon afterward begun, and continued until the surrender July 4, 1863, the remnants of the ten Georgia regiments shared the heroic services and uncomplaining endurance of Pemberton's little army. There was not much opportunity for those sallies which enliven the history of famous sieges in romance. The only ones mentioned by General Stevenson were made by Georgians. Lieut.-Col. C. S.
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
M. B. Young fought with great credit. Again at Trevilian Station Young's brigade made a splendid record. The loss in Hampton's division was 61 2, of whom 59 were killed. Among the killed, Hampton greatly regretted the loss of Lieutenant-Colonel McAllister of the Seventh Georgia, and Capt. Whiteford D. Russell of the same regiment, who at the time was acting major. Captain Russell had been in service from the beginning of the war, having been a lieutenant of the Walker light infantry of Augusta, Company I, of Ramsey's First Georgia. Early in May, Gen. A. H. Colquitt had been ordered to Richmond, and on May 15th the Fifty-sixth regiment was ordered up from Macon, and the Twelfth battalion and Forty-seventh and Fifty-fifth regiments from Savannah. Colquitt's Georgia brigade and Ransom's North Carolina brigade formed a division under General Colquitt, in Beauregard's forces for the defense of Petersburg. The brigade bore a creditable part in the battle near Drewry's Bluff, May 1
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ition by LieutenantColo-nel Black and the acting adjutant, Lieut. George W. McLaughlin, of Company A (the Oglethorpes of Augusta), and marched in order to the position assigned it in line of battle. Among the killed was Legare Hill, son of Hon. Jos H. T. Walker. It is impossible to get a statement of the losses of the entire regiment, but Lieut. Walter A. Clark, of Augusta, who was at that time orderly sergeant of Company A, and who still has in his possession the roll of the company with fut 400 in action; Gholson's brigade, attached to Reynolds, lost 144 out of 450, and Youngblood's Georgia battalion, from Augusta, lost 9 out of 500. Loring's division, of Stewart's corps, took position along the Lickskillet road and held that linro, and the second under General Stoneman from the east flank of the Federal army toward the railroad from Macon east to Augusta, were well under way. Nearly 10,000 cavalry were in these two formidable columns, but the genius of Wheeler and Jackson
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