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e First Vermont, Col. Tompkins, joined us at Winchester with six pieces of artillery, and participat trains was complied with. They started for Winchester that night, and were thus saved. The morn of cavalry were seen in the distance toward Winchester, my then rear. It was now about eight o'clumn thus proceeded to join the main body at Winchester. Fearful of an attempt on the part of the ee field and brought to within a few miles of Winchester, was abandoned, necessarily, and captured byugh, however, without meeting them and on to Winchester and encamped. Our early and rapid march pl fire of our men. On the column moved to Kernstown, five miles from Winchester. Here a halt waWinchester. Here a halt was ordered. But the e<*>my soon poured in a fire which told on the men, exposed by their relief agail could not break it. And a few miles out of Winchester, Gen. Banks ordered a halt to reform any dis town, after the rebels had made a dash into Winchester, our men formed in line of battle. The scen[60 more...]
summer was well-nigh here. A movement had been ordered that morning. They say that history shows that battles begun on Sunday seldom are successes for the attacking party. Whether this will prove an exception to the general rule, I will not say, but leave the sequel to tell. A reconnoissance made on Saturday by Gen. Milroy, with the Second, Third, Fifth and Eighth Virginia, and Fifty-fifth and Sixtieth Ohio, clearly revealed the fact that Jackson, after having travelled the pike from Winchester, had suddenly turned to the left in the direction of Port Republic, over a miserably bad road, and with the intention of crossing the river. At this place, twelve miles south-east of Harrisonburgh, was a bridge over the Shenandoah. Other bridges had previously been destroyed, and it seemed pretty clear that he intended to use this. Part of Shields's force, as early as Saturday, had a little fight over the bridge, but could not hold it. Early in the morning the army was in motion, Co
were again ordered to move, left in front, on the Winchester road, and had proceeded about two miles when theyured. One gun was brought within five miles of Winchester, and abandoned by Lieut. Atwell only when his horwhich Quartermaster Lyeth succeeded in getting to Winchester, where he found Lieut. Taylor, of company B, who ed Quartermaster Lyeth in getting the horses from Winchester. Our little band of patriots only numbered a learly, were off at a tangent for somewhere on the Winchester road. On our way to Middletown the road was often he heard of our doings, cut stick and broke for Winchester in hot haste; but we cut his force in twain at Mioods ring with uproarious joy. Three miles beyond Winchester yesterday morning, the enemy made a stand, and th after the fight opened, set fire to the depot in Winchester, and destroyed all of his stores, and some say heast one thousand two hundred prisoners already in Winchester, and squads continually being taken to swell the
Colonel Miles occupying the place with one company of the Maryland P. H. brigade. He had pushed forward that morning a battalion, composed of the First District of Columbia regiment and Eleventh regiment Pennsylvania volunteers, on the cars to Winchester to reenforce Gen. Banks. They were too late, he having retreated; and they returned to Harper's Ferry. The same evening reenforcements arrived, consisting of the Seventy-eighth New-York, One Hundred and Ninth Pennsylvania, a naval battery of Dahlgren guns, under Lieut. Daniels, U. S.N., and four companies of the Fifth New-York cavalry from Winchester. On the twenty-seventh other troops arrived, with Capt. Crounse's and Reynolds's battery of the First New-York artillery. I occupied Bolivar Heights with my troops, and Maryland Heights with the naval battery. On the same evening I sent two companies of Col. Maulsby's First Maryland regiment, under Major Steiner, to make a reconnoissance of Loudoun Heights, where it was reported th
., shoulders and thighs; Thos. Jefferson Vimont, Seventh Kentucky cavalry, right thigh; B. T. Amos, do., left arm; John H. Orr, do., right arm; Wm. Pussly, Co. I, Eighteenth Kentucky, abdomen; Wm. Nourse, Home Guards, side. I can give no accurate account of the rebel dead, Morgan having taken off eight burial-cases from this place, and his men having been seen hauling off their dead toward Georgetown, the Magee road, and Millersburgh road after the fight. Two of their wounded died at Winchester, and two beyond that place. Since Morgan left, thirteen of his dead have been taken from the river near Cynthiana, where they were thrown for concealment. Morgan himself admitted, at Paris, a loss here of twenty-four killed and seventy-eight wounded, and that of seventeen engagements, participated in by him since the beginning of the war, the affair at Cynthiana was much the fiercest and most desperate. I append also a list of rebel wounded left in Cynthiana: Geo. W. Clarke, Simpso
successively at Front Royal, Middletown and Winchester, capturing several thousands of prisoners, aere in the valley of the Shenandoah, between Winchester and Middletown, the bulk of the forces beingginning of the campaign placed in command at Winchester. He was selected for that position because culty in returning to you they shall go into Winchester, and communicate their information to Gen. We entered Harper's Ferry with his force from Winchester. The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgn a raid upon a train from Harper's Ferry to Winchester a short time before, was captured and broughhrough our lines to rejoin the rebel army at Winchester. Other cases are testified to, but those arwere so posted as to guard the approach from Winchester. Four twenty-pound Parrotts, three twenty-fto Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16. After the advance of our a offered to forward it to the post-office at Winchester. I will only add, that the timely appeara[1 more...]
ston's address. headquarters Department of Northern Virginia, May 29, 1862. the Commanding General has the proud satisfaction of announcing to the army another brilliant success, won by the skill and courage of our generals and troops in the Valley. The combined divisions of Major-Generals Jackson and Ewell, constituting a portion of this army, and commanded by the former, attacked and routed the Federal forces, under Major-Gen. Banks, successively at Front Royal, Middletown and Winchester, capturing several thousands of prisoners, and an immense quantity of ammunition and stores of all descriptions. The Federal army has been dispersed and ignominiously driven from the Valley of the Shenandoah, and those who have freed the loyal citizens of that district by their patriotic valor, have again earned, as they will receive, the thanks of a grateful country. In making this glorious announcement, on the eve of the memorable struggle about to ensue, the Commanding General doe
lutely necessary for troops in the field. The corps of Banks and Fremont were in the valley of the Shenandoah, between Winchester and Middletown, the bulk of the forces being in the vicinity of the latter place. One division of McDowell's corps w of their duties. Brig.-Gen. Julius White, with one brigade, was in the beginning of the campaign placed in command at Winchester. He was selected for that position because I felt entire confidence in his courage and ability, and during the whole o18,671 Third Army Corps,17,6049712,90421,479   Total,41,4973,1438,73853,358 Deduct Infantry Brigade stationed at Winchester,2,500  Deduct Regiment and Battery at Front Royal,1,000  Deduct Cavalry unfit for service,3,000--6,500 Total, 46,858eliable men for that purpose, and instruct them that if they find any difficulty in returning to you they shall go into Winchester, and communicate their information to Gen. White. You will receive instructions as to your movements in the morning.
e the honor to report the following: On the third of September Gen. White entered Harper's Ferry with his force from Winchester. The next day he was ordered to Martinsburgh, to take command of the forces there. On the twelfth of September he aga Lieutenant Rouse, of the Twelfth Vir<*>nia cavalry, who had been engaged in a raid upon a train from Harper's Ferry to Winchester a short time before, was captured and brought into Harper's Ferry. He escaped while on the way to the hospital to havel. Miles directed that sixteen confederate prisoners be permitted to pass through our lines to rejoin the rebel army at Winchester. Other cases are testified to, but those are the most important. Brigadier--General Julius White and Colonels D'utaemy attempt to make a crossing, while a portion of the Eighty-seventh Ohio were so posted as to guard the approach from Winchester. Four twenty-pound Parrotts, three twenty-four howitzers, and several twelve and six-pounders were planted in the grav
ndred to two thousand. Of our losses we are not apprised, but judge from reports that Gen. Jackson's column suffered pretty heavily. In Walker's division we had five killed, three of these by the accidental explosion of a shell. Among the killed in this division, we have heard the name of Lieut. Robertson, of French's battery. later.--Since the above was written we have received the following additional particulars, contained in a letter to Gov. Letcher from Col. Francis H. Smith: Winchester, September 16. After the advance of our army to Frederick, and the issuing of the admirable proclamation to the people of Maryland by Lee, a movement took place with our troops, seemingly in the direction of Pennsylvania, but really for an important movement into Virginia. After sending a portion of his troops to occupy and hold the Maryland Heights, Gen. Jackson was directed by Gen. Lee to recross the Potomac at Williamsport, take possession of Martinsburgh, and then pass rapidly behi
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