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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
troops and suddenly seize, fortify and hold Winchester, whereby I should at once more effectually cney, he returned with his own old brigade to Winchester, January 24th, and disposed his cavalry and that the troops were already six miles from Winchester and ten from the enemy. The plan was now ev the skirmish, Ashby camped for the night at Kernstown, three miles south of Winchester. General ents and Daum's artillery to the vicinity of Kernstown. Sullivan's brigade of four regiments was pnd get command of the road from Kernstown to Winchester in the enemy's rear. He gained the top of tn body, which has already passed him towards Winchester. He overhauls them in the afternoon, pushest of Banks' army occupies the ridge on which Kernstown had been fought, but at a point two miles fut to be over-whelmed, Banks retreats through Winchester. Jackson presses closely, and the Federals pushed to get north of Banks on the road to Winchester. Banks ran a race with them, beating them i[41 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. (search)
Report of General Edward Johnson of capture of Winchester. headquarters Johnson's division, August 18th, 1863. Major A. S. Pendleton, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major — In obedience to ord following report of the operations of my division from the time of leaving Fredericksburg for Winchester until it crossed the Potomac. The division left camp near Hamilton's crossing June 5th, 1863, and moved in the direction of Winchester, crossing the Blue Ridge at Chester Gap. Nothing occurred worthy of particular note during the march, which was steady and regular, the command being in goortion of my artillery, to a point on the Martinsburg turnpike, two and a half miles north of Winchester, with the double purpose, I suppose, of intercepting the enemy's retreat and attacking him in ections of the Lieutenant-General; and, moreover, that near Stephenson's, five miles north of Winchester, there was a railroad cut, masked by a body of woods and not more than two hundred yards from
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign. (search)
n's crossing on the 4th of June last. Halting at Culpeper Courthouse two days, on the night of the 12th, after a most exhausting march of seventeen miles in about six hours, we reached Front Royal. I was ordered to move on the pike leading to Winchester at three o'clock A. M., 13th of June. Fording both branches of the Shenandoah, we marched to a point on the Staunton pike, about five and one half miles from Winchester, when, as ordered by Major-General Early, I moved to the left of this roadWinchester, when, as ordered by Major-General Early, I moved to the left of this road and formed line of battle three miles southwest of the town. About four o'clock in the afternoon I deployed a line of skirmishers and moved forward to the attack, holding two regiments (the Thirteenth and Thirty-first Georgia) in reserve. After advancing several hundred yards, I found it necessary to bring into line these two regiments — the Thirty-first on the Tight and the Thirteenth on the left. The enemy's skirmishers retreated on his battle line, a portion of which occupied a strong pos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketches of operations of General John C. Breckinridge. (search)
h, when he crossed the Blue Ridge in direction of Winchester at Snicker's gap, and camped beyond the Shenandoaely pressed, as a heavy column was moving against Winchester, where he had sent Ramseur's division, which hereShenandoah, and on the main road from Staunton to Winchester, twenty-four miles south of the latter place. Th: It having been ascertained that the enemy was at Kernstown, five or six miles south of Winchester, it was prWinchester, it was proposed to march with the infantry at daylight to the attack, the cavalry to be sent on the back road, a dirt ridge's predictions. The enemy were found to be at Kernstown as expected. The army was drawn up in line of bat The army halted for the night three miles beyond Winchester, and for the first time in many days had full ratOpequon and Bunker Hill, fourteen miles north of Winchester until the 19th of September, when Sheridan advancryville pike, a mile and a half or two miles from Winchester, in which Sheridan was repulsed heavily; but his
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of General Richard Taylor. (search)
resident Zachary Taylor. His father and mother were natives of Virginia, and his grand father, also a Virginian, commanded a brigade of Virginia troops in the battle of Brandywine. The hereditary residence of the family was in Orange county, Virginia. President Taylor's eldest daughter married Lieutenant Jefferson Davis, the late President of the Southern Confederacy; another daughter married Surgeon Wood, of the United States army, and the other was Mrs. Bliss, now Mrs. Dandridge, of Winchester. When her father was President of the United States, it was Mrs. Bliss who gracefully extended the hospitalities of the President's house. Quite early in life General Dick Taylor took charge of his father's plantation in Mississippi, and soon afterwards moved to a fine estate in Louisiana, to the development of which he addressed himself until the war of 1861 called him to the field. He married Miss Bringer, of Louisiana, thereby connecting himself with several able and prominent men of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragrpahs. (search)
ighly appreciated. The ceremonies at Winchester, Virginia, on Friday, June the 6th, were of deepevilege to be permitted to mingle in them. Winchester--battle-scarred, heroic, glorious old WincheWinchester — has been first to carry out the eloquent suggestion of Bishop Elliott, of Georgia, and to reasas. Looking southward, we see the field of Kernstown, where Stonewall Jackson first taught Shieldemories of those stirring movements by which Winchester changed hands no less than eighty-three time there stands hard by the heroic old town of Winchester, whose people, from 1861 to 1865, threw open South, had been inaugurated), two ladies of Winchester (Mrs. Phil. Williams and Mrs. A. H. H Boyd) honor our Confederate dead, a few ladies in Winchester organized themselves together as the Virginiames B. Russell, chairman Finance Committee, Winchester.] Nor will our limited space allow any dend distinguished statesman. The people of Winchester threw wide open their doors, and entertained
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--full report of General J. E. B. Stuart. (search)
agerstown, a little north of the National road. Cavalry pickets were extended beyond the railroad leading to Chambersburg, and everything put in readiness to resist the enemy's attack. The situation of our communications south of the Potomac caused the Commanding-General to desire more cavalry on that side, and accordingly Brigadier-General Jones' brigade (one of whose regiments, Twelfth Virginia cavalry, had been left in Jefferson) was detached and sent to cover our communication with Winchester. The cavalry on the left consisted now of Fitz. Lee's, W. H. F. Lee's, Baker's, and Robertson's brigades — the latter being a mere handful. On the 13th skirmishing continued at intervals; but it appeared that the enemy, instead of attacking, was entrenching himself in our front, and the Commanding-General determined to cross the Potomac. The night of the 13th was chosen for this move, and the arduous and difficult task of bringing up the rear was, as usual, assigned to the cavalry.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Barbara Frietchie --refutation of Whittier's myth. (search)
ace, I must give an extract from what the writer in the Sun calls Whittier's lofty numbers, as follows: On that pleasant morn of the early fall, When Lee marched over the mountain wall-- Over the mountains winding down, Horse and foot, into Frederick town, Forty flags, with their silver stars, Forty flags, with their crimson bars, Flapped in the morning wind: the sun Of noon looked down, and saw not one. Up rose old Barbara Frietchie then, Bowed with her forescore years and ten; Bravest of all in Frederick town, She took up the flag the men hauled down. In her attic-window the staff she set, To show one heart was loyal yet. It must be confessed that these are pretty tall figures; especially when it is remembered that General Lee's army crossed the Potomac a short distance above Leesburg, in Loudoun county, and did not have to cross any mountains at all to get into Frederick. Then, too, if there were forty flags, with their silver stars, and forty flags, with their crimson bars,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
J. A. Judson, who was Assistant Adjutant-General of Hatch's cavalry brigade, made a very fierce attack on General Dick Taylor's statement that he saw breastplates and other protective devices on the persons of Federal soldiers at Middleburg and Winchester, on Jackson's Valley compaign. The gallant Captain waited until after the death of General Taylor to say that he states what he knew to be a deliberate falsehood, and uses other very ugly language concerning General Taylor's narrative, recallipended on it would have been more appropriate at an earlier date. In a subsequent issue of the Nation, W. S. Symington, of Baltimore, who was Adjutant of the Twenty-first Virginia regiment at the time, testifies that he saw at Middleburg and Winchester several breastplates on dead Federal soldiers. Colonel William LeRoy Broun (now professor in Vanderbilt University, then in charge of the arsenal at Richmond) publishes in the same issue a statement to the effect that a few days after the Se
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
duly announced; but we are expecting a pleasant and profitable meeting. The monument to the unknown dead, at Winchester, Virginia, we have fully described as at the same time a beautiful work of art and a fitting tribute to the memory of those or buying this photograph, which is sold for the benefit of the fund. The Maryland shaft for Stonewall Cemetery, Winchester, has been fully provided for. On returning from the unveiling of the monument at Winchester, the Confederate army and NWinchester, the Confederate army and Navy Association of Baltimore went to work at once, and in a few weeks had raised a sum amply sufficient to provide a Maryland shaft for the Maryland section of the cemetery at Winchester. Well done for Maryland! And now what State will follow next?Winchester. Well done for Maryland! And now what State will follow next? Let comrades in the other States see to it that their dead are thus honored. The recumbent figure of Lee, by Valentine, is certainly one of the most beautiful works of art in this country. Indeed, when the mausoleum at Lexington is completed
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