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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
The clothing and equipments procured by her did not arrive until we were at Winchester. Many of the men were indecent for the want of clothes, wanting coats, shirtthis General Johnson did on a line extending from Acquia Creek by Leesburg to Winchester, with a scantiness of resources and disparity of force, which, when known, wilellan had determined to attack him, and sending Banks by a grand movement by Winchester and the Berryville road to flank the position at Centreville, moved Kearney un was frustrated by this sudden move to the Rappahannock. Banks fell back to Winchester, where he remained stationary for several weeks, and McClellan moved his armyrisoners were being brought in by the cavalry, who went within three miles of Winchester and captured the whole force, except some twenty or thirty infantry and a fewriven out by infantry. We then retraced our steps and camped by the side of a stream, seven miles from Winchester, without fires, and in the rain, without blankets.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign-operations of the Artillery. (search)
ahannock. About 12 M. June 13th Johnsons division with Andrews's battalion came in sight of Winchester, on the Front Royal road, driving in the enemy's advance and exploding one of their limbers. sualties there were five killed and fourteen wounded. There were captured from the enemy at Winchester four 30-pound Parrotts, seventeen 3-inch rifles and two 24-pound howitzers. The first two classes were exchanged for inferior guns, which were left at Winchester. While these two divisions were engaged in the capture of Winchester, General Rodes with Carter's battalion had moved around by Winchester, General Rodes with Carter's battalion had moved around by Berryville to Martinsburg, which place was abandoned after a short artillery fight, in which Captain Fry's battery lost one killed and one wounded. Five 3-inch rifles were taken at this point, which wed by Lieutenant-Colonel Jones for one of his, disabled. In this engagement, as in the one at Winchester, the officers and men behaved with the greatest gallantry, fully sustaining the high character
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. (search)
Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. Headquarters V. D., October 9th, 1864, (New Market.) General R. E. Lee: General,--I they, together with Breckenridge's division, were encamped (Ramseur being at Winchester, to cover the road from Berryville) to Bunker Hill, and on the 18th I moved Gemy's cavalry in check should it advance up that valley. The enemy's loss at Winchester was very heavy. Dr. McGuire has received a letter from a member of his famil who states that 5,800 of the enemy's wounded were brought to the hospital at Winchester, and that the total wounded was between 6,000 and 7,000, and a gentleman who of our Surgeons, left at Woodstock, that the number of wounded in hospital at Winchester was the same as stated in the letter to Dr. McGuire, and I am satisfied from e to rally it. The artillery behaved splendidly, both on this occasion and at Winchester. I had to order the guns to be withdrawn, but the difficulties of the ground
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of the First Maryland regiment. (search)
of Winchester. At 3 o'clock Sunday morning, May 25th, we took the road for Winchester. The long march of the day before had been made without rations, except the on the ridge of hills which rises on the Front Royal road to the southeast of Winchester, and distant from it a mile or a mile and ahalf. This crest sweeps around thvy fog which had, till then, masked our movements. Before us lay the town of Winchester in all the quiet of the hour and the day. Far to the left stretched the Yankem General Jackson's instructions, to wit: that if Fremont was pressing toward Winchester, General Jackson would endeavor to hold it to let us get through, but if he cwith a general understanding that we were in a tight place, we struck off for Winchester. We marched through there just after dark, and at ten o'clock lay down on th Captain Brown's cavalry company, which had joined us just after the fight at Winchester. He had also assigned to him the Fifty-eighth, Forty-fourth, and two other V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
-I hereby beg leave to submit the following report of the operations of this battalion in the recent engagements around Winchester. On the morning of the 13th June we marched at 4 o'clock A. M. with Johnson's division from our encampment at Cedarvollowing the front brigade under immediate direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Andrews. This battery arrived in sight of Winchester about 12 o'clock M. Had it proceeded directly up the road it would have been subjected to the fire of a battery stationo'clock A. M., and moving towards that pike. The remainder of the battalion had been left under my command in front of Winchester. The batteries under command of Colonel Andrews were marching closed up on the infantry, and the first intimation of command of Lieutenant Lambie, was served in the most efficient manner, both on the day on which we arrived in front of Winchester and the 15th instant. The Lieutenant finds difficulty in making any distinctions, but mentions Sergeant-Major Benjamin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Artillery on the Gettysburg campaign. (search)
alion was placed in position on this line, on both sides of the road, with orders to fortify it, which was done during the night and the following day. During the evening of the 13th I was ordered to send my caissons across the Potomac and to withdraw my pieces at dark. The order was promptly obeyed, and we recrossed the river without loss on the morning of the 14th. We arrived at Culpeper C. H. on the 25th, having camped successively, near Bunker's Hill, on a farm about ten miles from Winchester, near Millwood, on the left bank of the Shenandoah, at Gaines's Cross-Roads, and on the right bank of Hazel river. During this march, although threatened by the enemy, there was no engagement, and we suffered no loss of any kind. I was much indebted to Major S. R. Hamilton for assistance rendered me on every occasion. I desire to return my thanks to my Ordnance officer, Lieutenant H. L. Powell, and Ordnance-Sergeant O. M. Price, for their efficiency. Lieutenant Powell, though wounded,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Campaigns of the civil war — ChancellorsvilleGettysburg. (search)
rt could not have had over 10,000 or 11,000 out of 13,300. But of Stuart's seven brigades three (Robertson's, Jones's and Imboden's) were not present at Gettysburg, having been engaged (like French's Federal division at Frederick, which is not included in Meade's numbers) in protecting communications, guarding supplies, &c., in the rear. So Stuart had 6,000 or 7,000 cavalry at Gettysburg. The Confederate infantry and artillery numbered 64,159 less the small losses in the battles about Winchester, and the far greater losses from the exhaustion of a march of two hundred miles. These losses have been variously estimated at from 5,000 to 11,000 men. So far no returns have been found that would fix the latter with exactness, but it is very evident that Lee's infantry and artillery present for duty July 1st, did not reach 60,000 men, and that 66,000 or 67,000 men of all arms, present for duty, is a liberal statement of his force. The Confederate returns had no column for present for
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial paragraphs. (search)
torial paragraphs. Typographical errors are always annoying, and especially when they affect the sense of important historical statements. We believe our printers are generally very accurate, and even where mistakes sometimes creep in it may be the fault of the copy, or of our proof-reading, rather than of the printers. But in our January-February number were some mistakes, which (whether made by the copyist or the printers) ought to be corrected. In General Early's letter about Winchester, he is made to write (page 79) Burntown for Brucetown, and to say that he would have still won the day if our cavalry could have stopped the enemy's, but so overwhelming was the battle, and so demoralized was the larger part of ours, that no assistance was received from it. Battle should have been latter. General Early writes so carefully and accurately, that we are particularly annoyed when mistakes creep into his articles, even when (as in this case) the fault is in the copyist. Capta
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The PeninsulaMcClellan's campaign of 1862, by Alexander S. Webb. (search)
gades may have numbered 6,000 at this time. Thus the Confederates were able to concentrate about 65,000 men to oppose the 150,000 which were about to unite against them. It would be hard to find a finer illustration of the adage, that fortune favors the brave than occurred at this juncture. Stonewall Jackson, after defeating Fremont's advance in the mountains of West Virginia, and while he was supposed to be one hundred and fifty miles away, suddenly surprised Banks at Front Royal and Winchester, and driving him in confusion and route across the Potomac, advanced to Harper's Ferry. Jackson and his 16,000 men created a marvelous panic at Washington and throughout the North, the accounts of which at this day read like the pages of a romance. The Federal Capitol was believed to be in danger, 300,000 men were called for by the President, the militia of whole States were ordered out, and the proclamations of Governors as far away as Ohio and Massachusetts would not have seemed tame t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 4.37 (search)
zey and Steuart our first and second Colonels had been wounded in battle and were out of the field. They were never consulted about it. Colonel Johnson had been the sole field officer with it since Lieutenant-Colonel Dorsey had been wounded at Winchester, and having been continously in the field since the war commenced, had neither time nor taste for the Richmond intrigues. No more cruel blow could have been struck at him or his brother officers. They had fronted and fought the enemy for fifte, Esq., of Richmond, to be properly fixed and given to the Virginia Historical Society. On it should be imprinted or painted the names of Manassas First, Munson's Hill, Upton's Hill, Hall's Hill, Sangster's Station, Rappahannock, Front Royal, Winchester, Bolivar Heights, Harrisonburg (Bucktails), Cross Keys, Port Republic, Cold Harbor, Malvern Hill and Westover, being fifteen battles and skirmishes in which the regiment had been engaged. The regimental fund in the possession of Captains Her
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