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Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White) 10 0 Browse Search
Sophocles, Electra (ed. Sir Richard Jebb) 4 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 4 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 4 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 2 0 Browse Search
Pindar, Odes (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien) 2 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 2 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Iliad (ed. Samuel Butler) 2 0 Browse Search
Elias Nason, The Life and Times of Charles Sumner: His Boyhood, Education and Public Career. 2 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 4. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 2 0 Browse Search
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Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 267 (search)
But if you will be moved by me —for you, lord, are stronger and mightier than I, and your strength is very great —build at Crisa below the glades of Parnassus: there no bright chariot will clash, and there will be no noise of swift-footed horses near your well-built altar. But so the glorious tribes of men will bring gifts to you as Iepaeon (‘Hail-Healer’), and you will receive with delight rich sacrifices from the people dwelling round about.” So said Telphusa, that she alone, and not the Far-you went, far-shooting Apollo, until you came to the town of the presumptuous Phlegyae who dwell on this earth in a lovely glade near the Cephisian lake, caring not for Zeus. And thence you went speeding swiftly to the mountain ridge, and came to Crisa beneath snowy Parnassus, a foothill turned towards the west: a cliff hangs over it from above, and a hollow, rugged glade runs under. There the lord Phoebus Apollo resolved to make his lovely temple, and thus he said: “In this place I am
Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 397 (search)
was making for Pherae, exulting in the breeze from Zeus, there appeared to them below the clouds the steep mountain of Ithaca, and Dulichium and Same and wooded Zacynthus. But when they were passed by all the coast of Peloponnesus, then, towards Crisa, that vast gulf began to heave in sight which through all its length cuts off the rich isle of Pelops. There came on them a strong, clear west-wind by ordinance of Zeus and blew from heaven vehemently, that with all speed the ship might finish cohip might finish coursing over the briny water of the sea. So they began again to voyage back towards the dawn and the sun: and the lord Apollo, son of Zeus, led them on until they reached far-seen Crisa, land of vines, and into haven: there the sea-coursing ship grounded on the sands. Then, like a star at noonday, the lord, far-working Apollo, leaped from the ship: flashes of fire flew from him thick and their brightness reached to heaven. He entered into his shrine between priceless tripods,
Hymn 3 to Apollo (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White), line 444 (search)
and there made a flame to flare up bright, showing forth the splendor of his shafts, so that their radiance filled all Crisa, and the wives and well-girded daughters of the Crisaeans raised a cry at that outburst of Phoebus; for he cast great fear upon them all. From his shrine he sprang forth again, swift as a thought, to speed again to the ship, bearing the form of a man, brisk and sturdy, in the prime of his youth, while his broad shoulders were covered with his hair: and he spoke to the Cretans, uttering winged words: “Strangers, who are you? Whence come you sailing along the paths of the sea? Are you for traffic, or do you wander at random over the sea as pirates do who put their own lives to hazard and bring mischief to men of foreign parts as they roam? Why rest you so and are afraid, and do not go ashore nor stow the gear of your black ship? For that is the custom of men who live by bread, whenever they come to land in their dark ships from the main, spent with toil: at once d
Isocrates, Plataicus (ed. George Norlin), section 31 (search)
hey alone of the alliesThis is an exaggeration; not only the Thebans, but the Corinthians and other Peloponnesians, voted for the destruction of Athens, but Sparta refused; cf. Xen. Hell. 2.2.19-20. vote that your city should be reduced to slavery and its territory be abandoned to pasturage as was the plain of Crisa,After the first Sacred War, at the end of the sixth century B.C., the plain of Crisa, between Delphi and the Corinthian Gulf, was declared holy ground and was dedicated to Apollo. hey alone of the alliesThis is an exaggeration; not only the Thebans, but the Corinthians and other Peloponnesians, voted for the destruction of Athens, but Sparta refused; cf. Xen. Hell. 2.2.19-20. vote that your city should be reduced to slavery and its territory be abandoned to pasturage as was the plain of Crisa,After the first Sacred War, at the end of the sixth century B.C., the plain of Crisa, between Delphi and the Corinthian Gulf, was declared holy ground and was dedicated to Apollo.
Pausanias, Description of Greece, Phocis and Ozolian Locri, chapter 37 (search)
he horses, either by reason of a hero or on any other account. The plain from Cirrha is altogether bare, and the inhabitants will not plant trees, either because the land is under a curse, or because they know that the ground is useless for growing trees. It is said that to Cirrha...and they say that from Cirrha the place received its modern name. Homer, however, in the Iliad,Hom. Il. 2.520 and similarly in the hymn to Apollo,See HH Apoll. 269, 282, 438. calls the city by its ancient name of Crisa. Afterwards the people of Cirrha behaved wickedly towards Apollo; especially in appropriating some of the god's land. So the Amphictyons determined to make war on the Cirrhaeans, put Cleisthenes, tyrant of Sicyon, at the head of their army, and brought over Solon from Athens to give them advice. They asked the oracle about victory, and the Pythian priestess replied:—You will not take and throw down the tower of this city,Until on my precinct shall dash the waveOf blue-eyed Amphitrite, roarin
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 5 For Arcesilas of Cyrene Chariot Race 462 B. C. (search)
did not bring with him Excuse, the daughter of late-thinking Afterthought, when he came to the house of the descendants of Battus who rule by right;but he was welcomed beside the waters of Castalia, and he flung over your hair the prize of honor for the victorious chariot; his reins were undamaged in the precinct of the twelve swift-footed courses. For he broke no part of his strong equipment; it hangs dedicated there,all the handiwork of dextrous craftsmen, which he brought past the hill of Crisa to the hollow valley of the god. The cypress shrine keeps itbeside the statue which the Cretan bowmen set up in the Parnassian chamber, carved from a single piece of wood. Therefore it is fitting to welcome a benefactor with a willing mind.Son of Alexibias, the lovely-haired Graces make you radiant. You are blessed, you who have, even after great hardship, a memorial of the best words. For among fortydrivers who fell, having brought your chariot through unscathed with a fearless mind, you ha
Pindar, Pythian (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Pythian 6 For Xenocrates of Acragas Chariot Race 490 B. C. (search)
ly for Xenocrates, a Pythian victor's treasure-house of songs has been built and is ready in the glen of Apollo, rich in gold. It is buffeted by neither the invading onset of winter rain, the loud-roaring cloud's pitiless army, nor the wind that sweeps all kinds of rubble into the depths of the sea. Its facade, shining in pure light,will announce your chariot victory to the speech of men and make it famous—the victory you share with your father and your race, Thrasybulus, won in the vales of Crisa. You keep it on your right hand anduphold the commandment, one of the precepts which they say once in the mountains the son of Philyra enjoined on the powerful son of Peleus, when he was separated from his parents: first of the gods, worship the son of Cronus, the loud-voiced ruler of lightning and thunder;and never deprive your parents of such honor during their allotted lifetime. Long ago, too, powerful Antilochus showed that he had this way of thinking;he died for his father's sake, by aw
Pindar, Isthmean (ed. Diane Arnson Svarlien), Isthmian 2 In memory of the victories of Xenocrates of Acragas Chariot Race ?470 B. C. (search)
t as things are now, she bids us heedthe saying of the Argive man, which comes closest to actual truth: “Money, money makes the man,” he said, when he lost his wealth and his friends at the same time. But enough, for you are wise. I sing the Isthmian victory with horses, not unrecognized, which Poseidon granted to Xenocrates,and sent him a garland of Dorian wild celery for his hair, to have himself crowned, thus honoring the man of the fine chariot, the light of the people of Acragas. And in Crisa widely powerful Apollo looked graciously on him, and gave him glory there as well. And joined with the renowned favors of the sons of Erechtheusin splendid Athens, he found no fault with the chariot-preserving hand of the man who drove his horses, the hand with which Nicomachus gave the horses full rein at the right moment—that driver whom the heralds of the seasons, the Elean truce-bearers of Zeus son of Cronus recognized, since they had no doubt experienced some hospitable act of friendshi<
Sophocles, Electra (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 174 (search)
Chorus Courage, my daughter, courage; Zeus in the skyis still mighty, and he sees and rules all. Leave your oversharp anger to him; be neither excessively hostile to those you hate, nor forgetful of them, since Time is a god who brings ease.Neither the son of Agamemnon, who dwells by Crisa's cattle-feeding shore nor the god who reigns beside Acheron is unmindful of you. Electra But the best part of life has passed away leaving me in hopelessness, and I have no strength left. I waste away without children and have no loving husband to champion me, but like some despised foreign slave,I serve in the halls of my father, wrapped in shabby garments and standing to eat scanty meals.
Sophocles, Electra (ed. Sir Richard Jebb), line 680 (search)
eir horses, and shook the reins in their hands; the whole course was filled with the clatter of rattling chariots; and the dust flew upward.All of them in a confused throng kept plying their goads unsparingly, so that one of them might pass the wheel-hubs and the snorting steeds of his rivals; for both at their backs and at their rolling wheels the breath of the horses foamed and smattered.Orestes, driving close to the near edge of the turning-post, almost grazed it with his wheel each time and, giving rein to the trace-horse on the right, he checked the horse on the inner side. To this point, all the chariots still stood upright. But then the Aenian'shard-mouthed colts carried him out of control as they passed out of the turn from the sixth into the seventh lap and dashed their foreheads against the rig of the Barcaean. Next, as a result of this one mishap, the cars kept smashing and colliding with each other, and the wholerace-ground of Crisa swelled with shipwrecked chariots.
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