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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 45 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 14 0 Browse Search
General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 2, 17th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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General Horace Porter, Campaigning with Grant, Chapter 24 (search)
xpedition. Only three or four light gunboats were left, and one ironclad, the Onondaga, a powerful double-turreted monitor carrying two 15-inch smooth-bores and two at General Grant decided one morning to go up the James and pay a visit to the Onondaga, and invited me to accompany him. The monitor was lying above the pontoon-bridupied in fighting our naval vessels and the batteries ashore, he replied. The Onondaga ought to be able to sink them, but I don't know what they would do if they shofar. Just then news came in that upon the approach of the enemy's vessels the Onondaga had retired down the river. The captain had lost his head, and under pretenseief and Mrs. Grant retired to finish their interrupted sleep. At daylight the Onondaga moved up within nine hundred yards of the Confederate ironclad Virginia, the f and withdrew up the river. That night they came down again, and attacked the Onondaga, but retired after meeting with a disastrous fire from that vessel and our bat
May 30. N. P. Banks, of Massachusetts, was appointed a Major-General, and Robert C. Schenck, of Ohio, a Brigadier-General in the Army. The eminent intelligence, energy, and activity of these distinguished citizens render their appointment signally judicious and fortunate.--National Intelligencer, June 1. The Twelfth, Onondaga, and the Thirteenth, Rochester, N. Y., Regiments, commanded by Colonels Mulrath and Trumby, left Elmira for Washington. The Buffalo and Cayuga Regiments escorted them to the depot. An immense crowd was present to witness their departure.--N. Y. Commercial, May 30. The New Orleans Delta of to-day says: Henceforth all the cotton and other produce of the South destined for foreign markets must go from our seaports. So it has been determined by our Congress at Montgomery. The only exemption under the law is in favor of the trade between Mexico and Northwestern Texas. This is a wise measure. The threat of the Northern journals to force our shipm
n of State militia, under Major Chevreaux, and two hundred guerrillas, in which the latter were defeated and put to flight, with a loss of twenty-five killed and wounded. The National loss was three wounded.--St. Louis News, July 29. Yesterday the towns of Van Buren, Lysander and Marcellus, N. Y., subscribed four thousand five hundred dollars to aid in raising a regiment under the call of President Lincoln for more troops, issued on the first instant, and to-day the Salt Company of Onondaga, N. Y., subscribed ten thousand dollars for the same purpose. A slight skirmish occurred near Young's Cross-Roads, at the head of White Oak River, N. C., between a reconnoitring party of Union troops, under Colonel Heckman, of the Ninth New Jersey regiment, and a body of rebel cavalry, numbering about two hundred men, which resulted in the complete defeat of the rebels. Yesterday a skirmish took place near the Mountain Store, about twenty miles from Houston, Missouri, between a body
nsylvania, in command of his own regiment, with a section of the First New York artillery, and Griffin's brigade, crossed the Potomac from Maryland into Virginia at Reynolds's Ford, below Shepherdstown, Va., and captured over four hundred rifles, mostly marked London, 1862, and a twelve-pounder rifled brass cannon of English manufacture. The capture was accomplished without firing a shot; the rebel pickets falling back as the Union men advanced. The One Hundred and Forty-ninth (Fourth Onondaga) regiment, nine hundred strong, commanded by Col. Henry A. Barnum, left Syracuse for Washington at nine o'clock this morning. They went by way of Geneva, Elmira and Harrisburgh through Baltimore. Col. Barnum was not able to go with the regiment further than Elmira, not having fully recovered from his wound received on the Virginia Peninsula. Major-General Wright, in a special order issued at Cincinnati, Ohio, declared that the daily prohibition of business after four P. M. was rescin
Va. 1 Wilderness, Va. 16 Boydton Road, Va. 6 Po River, Va. 32 Hatcher's Run, Va. (1865) 1 Spotsylvania, Va. 15 Farmville, Va. 3 North Anna, Va. 3 Place unknown 2 Totopotomoy, Va. 2     Present, also, at Fredericksburg; Wapping Heights; Kelly's Ford; Strawberry Plains; Poplar Spring Church; White Oak Road; Sailor's Creek; Appomattox. notes.--Organized in October, 1861, at Elmira, N. Y., from companies recruited principally in Steuben county, with some from Chemung and Onondaga. After leaving Elmira the regiment was stationed at Washington, where it performed guard duty for several months. It took the field in August, 1862,--in Piatt's Brigade — and was engaged at Manassas, where it lost 13 killed, 67 wounded, and 38 missing. At Fredericksburg, then in Whipple's Division, Third Corps, it was slightly engaged, a few men being wounded there; but at Chancellorsville the Eighty-sixth was in the thickest of the fight; in that battle the intrepid Lieutenant-Colonel Ch<
at Grafton, Va., D. 86; troops at Philippi, D. 91 1st Regiment at Vienna, Va., D. 106 Olden, Gov., message of, D. 51; notice of, D. 60 Old Saybrook, Conn., Union demonstration at, D. 72 Old South Church, Boston, Mass., flag raised on, D. 53 Old Virginia, an extempore, P. 82 Oliver, Sophia H., P. 184 Oh! let the Starry Banner Wave, P. 62 On! Brothers, on! P. 45 Once a Week, its account of Abraham Lincoln, P. 12 On Fort Sumter, P. 19 Onondaga, N. Y., Regiment, D. 56 Opdyke, George, D. 32 Original Ode, sung at the Union convention Charleston, S. C., July 4, 1831, P. 30 Orr, —, appointed commissioner from S Carolina, D. 6 Osborne, B., speech in the English House of Commons, May 23. Doc. 302 Osgood, Samuel, D. D., D. 38 Ottendorfer, O. O., speech at the Union meeting, N. Y., Doc. 108 Ould, —, District Attorney, D. 5 Our Braves in Virginia, P. 65 Our Country, a poem, P. 63 Our Father
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The birth of the ironclads (search)
h turret masked a considerable angle of fire of the other. The Saugus, together with the Tecumseh and Canonicus and the Onondaga, served in the six-hour action with Battery Dantzler and the Confederate vessels in the James River, June 21, 1864. Agathe beginning of the last year of the war. The latest type of iron sea-elephant in 1864: the double-turreted monitor Onondaga After having steadily planned and built monitors of increasing efficiency during the war, the Navy Department finally turned its attention to the production of a double-turreted ocean cruiser of this type. The Onondaga was one of the first to be completed. In the picture she is seen lying in the James River. There, near Howlett's, she had steamed into her firstvessels engaging Battery Dantzler, the ram Virginia, and the other Confederate vessels that were guarding Richmond. The Onondaga continued to participate in the closing operations of the navy on the James. Of this class of double-turreted monitors
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The most famous naval action of the Civil war (search)
n the morning the crew were called to quarters. The army's chief reliance on the river — the double-turreted monitor Onondaga While Admiral Porter and his squadron were absent on the Fort Fisher expedition, it was of the greatest importance te Federal obstructions and attempted to get by. When the movement was discovered, contrary to all expectations the great Onondaga retreated down the river. The moment might well have been one of the greatest anxiety for the Federals, but in maneuvering, the Virginia and the Richmond both got aground and the Onondaga, returning with the Hunchback and the Massasoit, inflicted some telling shots upon them. It was found later by a court-martial that Commander William A. Parker, commanding the division on the James, had made an error of judgment in handling the Onondaga. When day dawned the officers of the Merrimac, who expected that the remaining vessels of the fleet would soon be at their mercy, were surprised to see a strange-looking cr
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
Naval actions along the shore A busy scene on the James, 1864: army tugs 4 and 5 in the foreground; the monitor Onondaga in the offing — with Grant at City Point, the river became the artery for army and navy communication A ferryboat ready for battle Take away the background of this picture of the Commodore Perry, substitute for it the lonely shore of the Carolina sounds or the Virginia rivers lined with men in gray uniforms, and you have an exact reproduction of how this oldhe Confederate flotilla on the James, at Trent's Reach, January 24, 1865, it was the Massasoit that received the only damage from the guns of the hostile vessels and the battery at Howlett's house. In the two-hour action after the return of the Onondaga up-stream, five men on the Massasoit were wounded. She was one of the third-class double-ender armored vessels and mounted ten guns. During this action she was commanded by Lieutenant G. W. Sumner, who displayed the utmost coolness and bravery
occasionally steamed as far up the river as this point. The queer-looking craft in the center of the river is the double-turreted monitor Onondaga. It was no longer safe for women and children to stay in A. M. Aiken's dwelling on the hill; shells from the warship might come hurtling ashore at the slightest sign of Confederates. After the success of the first monitor, several other ironclads were built after the same pattern. They were suitable for river service and harbor defense. The Onondaga rendered valuable aid to the army while Grant centered his operations against Richmond at City Point. In spite of the suspension of the cartel, exchanges went on in the East by special agreements for more than a year longer. In the West, many thousands were exchanged by Colonel C. C. Dwight, on the part of the United States, and Lieutenant-Colonel N. G. Watts and Major Ignatius Szymanski, on the part of the Confederacy. Generals Sherman and Hood also exchanged some prisoners afterward
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