Browsing named entities in Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.). You can also browse the collection for Merrimack (United States) or search for Merrimack (United States) in all documents.

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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
ty-nine dollars; and by cultivating beans and other vegetables he was able to support himself at an annual expense of a little more than eight dollars. This was removing the encumbrances from the equation, with a vengeance, but Thoreau could make a dinner of berries. The experiment lasted from March, 1845, until September, 1847, and then having satisfied himself that the thing could be done, he gave it up. Two years later, Thoreau published his first book, A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers. The actual voyage was performed by the two brothers Henry and John in the late summer of 1839 in a boat of their own making, painted green below with a border of blue, with reference to the two elements in which it was to spend its existence. During his Walden retirement, Thoreau worked over the original record of his pleasant outing, expanding it greatly by the inclusion of very various material, and had it published at his own risk by Monroe in 1849. It was the year of the Argonaut
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 13: Whittier (search)
Chapter 13: Whittier It was in 1638, when the great Puritan emigration to Massachusetts was beginning to slacken, that Thomas Whittier, a youth of eighteen, possibly of Huguenot extraction, landed in New England and made a home for himself on the shores of the Merrimac River. The substantial oak farmhouse which, late in life, he erected for his large family near Haverhill, is still standing. Descended from him in the fourth generation, John Greenleaf Whittier, the poet, was born in this house, 17 December, 1807. This is the homestead described with minute and loving fidelity in Snow-Bound, and it is typical of the many thousands of its sort that dotted the New England country-side, rearing in the old Puritan tradition a sturdy pioneer stock that was to blossom later in the fine flower of political and ethical passion, of statesmanship and oratory and letters. Though Whittier's family tree was originally Puritan, a Quaker scion was grafted upon it in the second American genera
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
300 Warren, James, 105 Warren, Mercy, Otis, 104, 105 Washington, Booker T., 323-325, 326, 351 Washington, George, 116, 117, 118, 181, 182, 260 Wasp, the, 387 Watts, Isaac, 401 Way down upon the Suwanee River, 353 Way to Arcady, the, 243 Wayland, Francis, 219 Webb, Charles Henry, 242 Webb, James Watson, 183 Weber, 353 Webster, Daniel, 50, 51, 71, 85, 86, 87, 88, 92-103, 135, 164, 207 Webster, Noah, 180, 396 Weekly register, 188 Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, a, 3, 4, 5, 9, 12 Weems, Parson, 104, 105 Wells, H. G., 394 Wendell, Evert Jansen, 225 Wentworth, Gov., Benning, 114 Western monthly magazine, the, 169 Western monthly review, the, 169 Western review and miscellaneous magazine, the, 169 Westminster review, the, 137, 140 West Point, 156 What was it?, 373, 374 Wheaton, Henry, 71, 78 Wheeler, Joseph, 291 When evening Cometh on, 331 When Lilacs Last in the Door-yard Bloomed, 286 When this Cruel War is