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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for Ouachita (United States) or search for Ouachita (United States) in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 41: the Red River expedition, under Major-General N. P. Banks, assisted by the Navy under Rear-Admiral David D. Porter. (search)
Camden on the 15th and found the place strongly fortified, so as to be impregnable against any force the enemy could bring to bear. Steele was now only a hundred miles from Shreveport, and could get all the supplies necessary by boats on the Washita River. In fact, he could have held on here until Banks reached Mansfield. But at Camden some captured Confederate dispatches gave the information of Banks' backward movement, which was soon confirmed by other intelligence. On the 18th, a foraged if Steele had marched to Columbia, La., through a much better country than the one he passed through. On arriving at Columbia, he would have been within eighty miles of General Banks, and could have been supplied with stores by way of the Washita River, where the gun-boats could have protected his transports and added to the strength of his artillery. The two armies could have been put in communication near Mansfield, one on each side of the Red River, and the Confederates would have ret
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
of the cotton in the trans-Mississippi States, hoping to get it to a market some time or other. The Admiral also ordered three thousand bales, seized up the Washita River, which was not considered within the limits of this expedition. Nearly five hundred bales of the first lot picked up near Alexandria was returned to the ownerit. No method of getting the cotton out of the country was indicated; and as the Navy succeeded in turning over to the Government 6,000 bales from the Red and Washita Rivers. their plan worked better than did that of General Banks. All the inhabitants of the country cared for was to get their cotton out, trusting to the futures; Walker's division, numbering 7,000 men, were upon the Atchafalaya and Red Rivers, from Opelousas to Fort De Russy; Mouton's division, between the Black and Washita rivers, from Red River to Monroe, numbering 6,000; while Price, with two heavy divisions of infantry, estimated at 5,000, and a large cavalry force, estimated at fro
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 43: operations of the Mississippi squadron, under Admiral Porter, after the Red River expedition. (search)
es at Liverpool. gun-boats damaged. pushing up the Yazoo. the expedition falls back. dashing attack on Waterloo. the Forest Rose drives Confederates out of Waterproof. important services rendered by tin-clads. expedition up Black and Washita Rivers. gun-boats drive Confederates out of Trinity and Harrisonburg. heroic seamen. Plot to blow up fleet. Confederate secret service. letters of Confederate Secretary of the Navy and others. names of persons in Confederate secret service. r. M. Anderson, Captain Commanding Post. H. C. Lunt, Lieutenant and Adjutant. Captain Johnston, Commanding Gun-boat No. 9. In the latter part of February, Admiral Porter fitted out an expedition to go, via the Red River, up the Black and Washita Rivers, under the command of Lieutenant-Commander F. M. Ramsey, for the purpose of breaking up the Confederate posts that were being formed along these rivers and destroying their provisions. The expedition consisted of the following vessels: Fort
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 55: operations of the Mississippi Squadron in the latter part of 1864 and in 1865. (search)
s now drawing rapidly to a close. The retreat of Hood left the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers comparatively free from Confederates, and there was little prospect of another invasion of the State while General Thomas remained in command. The vessels of the Mississippi Squadron were scattered along the great river, where the guerillas still carried on their operations on a small scale. Very little occurred that could embellish the pages of history. The Red River region was revisited, the Washita and Black Rivers patrolled, and every precaution taken to guard those inland waters. At this time the Confederate ram Webb succeeded in making her way past all the vessels of the fleet and reached a point twenty-five miles below New Orleans, where she was destroyed, as we have heretofore mentioned. This episode created quite an excitement in the fleet for the time, but it appears that no one was to blame for the Webb getting so far down the river unharmed. The dash of the Webb was the