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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Ouachita (United States) or search for Ouachita (United States) in all documents.

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Burr, Aaron, 1716- (search)
heme for revolutionizing Mexico — an idea agreeable to the Western people because of the existing difficulties with Spain. It was believed, too (for so Burr had continually hinted), that such a scheme was secretly favored by the government. Under this impression Burr's project received the countenance of several leading men in the Western country. One of the first things which Burr did after his arrival in Kentucky was to purchase an interest in a claim to a large tract of land on the Washita River, under a Spanish grant to the Baron de Bastrop. The negotiation was carried on through Edward Livingston at New Orleans. The avowal of an intention to settle on these lands might cover up a far different design. Blennerhassett now joined Burr actively in his enterprise. Together they built, with the money of the former, fifteen boats on the Muskingum River; and negotiations were set on foot with an Ohio senator to furnish supplies for an army in the West and the purchase of two gunbo
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Little Rock, capture of (search)
on the State capital, in two columns, led by Generals Steele and Davidson, having been reinforced. Gen. Sterling Price was in chief command of the Confederates. At Bayou Fourche, on the south side of the river, Davidson was confronted by Marmaduke, and, after a sharp struggle for two hours, the Confederates fell back towards the city. At the same time Steele was moving in a parallel line on the north side of the river. When the Nationals reached Little Rock the Confederates had abandoned it, and on the evening of Sept. 10 the city and its military appurtenances were surrendered to Davidson by the civil authorities. The troops had fled to Arkadelphia, on the Washita River. When the National troops entered the city eight steamboats, fired by the retreating Confederates, were in flames. In his campaign of forty days Steele lost about 100 men, killed, wounded, and prisoners, and captured about 1,000 prisoners. The National loss by sickness was very heavy— not less than 2,000 me
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Red River expedition. (search)
now urgent business. It was proposed to dam the river above and send the fleet through a sluice in the manner of running logs by lumbermen. Porter did not believe in the feasibility of the project; but Lieut.-Col. Joseph Bailey (q. v.) performed the service successfully. The whole expedition then proceeded towards the Mississippi, where Porter resumed the service of patrolling that stream. The forces of Banks were placed under the charge of Gen. E. R. S. Canby, on the Atchafalaya, and Gen. A. J. Smith's The fleet passing the Dam. troops returned to Mississippi. A strong confronting force of Confederates had kept Steele from co-operating with the expedition. He had moved from Little Rock with 8,000 men, pushed back the Confederates, and on April 15 had captured the important post at Camden, on the Wachita River; but after a severe battle at Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he had abandoned Camden and returned to Little Rock. So ended the disastrous Red River campaign.