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Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 0 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America, together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published: description of towns and cities. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 6 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Ouachita (United States) or search for Ouachita (United States) in all documents.

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hington, Arkansas, around which the cavalry were encamped, appreciated the arduous services he had performed and the wonderful successes he had achieved, and on his return received him as a conquering hero. Late in October General Marmaduke got permission from General Holmes to attack and take Pine Bluff. The place was held by Col. Powell Clayton, a bold and enterprising Federal officer, with probably 1,500 men. Clayton was in the habit of making periodical forays in the direction of Ouachita river, and General Holmes thought it would be well to teach him a lesson. Marmaduke's command for the expedition consisted of his own brigade under Col. Colton Greene; Cabell's brigade under Col. J. C. Monroe; Dobbins' brigade under Col. R. C. Newton; the portion of Shelby's brigade that did not accompany him into Missouri, under Col. G. W. Thompson; and three batteries—aggregating 2,300 men. This force was gradually concentrated at Princeton, nearly midway between Camden and Pine Bluff. By
h, 1864, Lieut.-Gen. T. H. Holmes was relieved of command of the district of Arkansas and ordered to report to Richmond. Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price succeeded him in command of the district. Late in March Shelby's brigade was sent north of the Ouachita river to watch the movements of the enemy, for it began to be suspected that two expeditions were being organized with Shreveport as their objective point, one from the south moving along the line of Red river, and the other from the north startingvident that he must evacuate Camden and force his way to Little Rock or Pine Bluff, or surrender. He was not disposed to surrender without first making an effort to escape. Shelby wanted Fagan to move his command down opposite Camden on the Ouachita river and keep him penned up where he was, or fight him every step he took along the corduroy road, which would be his only passageway through the swampy bottom after he crossed the river. Fagan said there was no forage there for the horses nor su