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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

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Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 30 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 20 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 14 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding). You can also browse the collection for Sabine (United States) or search for Sabine (United States) in all documents.

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P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 14, line 772 (search)
d Amulius in Awsonye by wrong, Till Numitor, the ryghtfull heyre, deposed verry long, Was by his daughters sonnes restorde. And on the feastfull day Of Pale, foundation of the walles of Rome they gan to lay. Soone after Tacye, and the Lordes of Sabine stird debate: And Tarpey for her traytrous deede in opening of the gate Of Tarpey towre was prest to death according to desert With armour heapt uppon her head. Then feerce and stowt of hart The Sabines like to toonglesse woolves without all noysirin that in stately robe dooth shyne. Hersilia for her feere as lost, of moorning made none end, Untill Queene Juno did commaund dame Iris to discend Uppon the Raynebowe downe, and thus her message for to doo: O of the Latian country and the Sabine nacion too Thou peerlesse perle of womanhod, most woorthy for to bee The wyfe of such a noble prince as heertofore was hee, And still to bee the wyfe of him canonized by name, Of Quirin: cease thy teares. And if thou have desyre the same Thy hol
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding), Book 15, line 1 (search)
A Persone in the whyle was sought sufficient to susteine The burthen of so great a charge, and woorthy for to reigne In stead of such a mighty prince. The noble Nume by fame (Whoo harped then uppon the truthe before to passe it came) Appoynted to the Empyre was. This Numa thought it not Inough that he the knowledge of the Sabine rites had got. The deepenesse of the noble wit to greater things was bent, To serch of things the natures out. The care of this intent Did cause that he from Curie and his native Countrye went With peynfull travell, to the towne where Hercules did hoste. And asking who it was of Greece that in th'Italian coast Had buylt that towne, an aged man well seene in storyes old, To satisfye his mynd therin the processe thus him told: As Hercules enriched with the Spannish kyne did hold His voyage from the Ocean sea, men say with lucky cut He came aland on Lacine coast. And whyle he there did put His beace to grazing, he himself in Crotons house did rest,