hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 30 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 20 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 14 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley). You can also browse the collection for Sabine (United States) or search for Sabine (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 1, line 33 (search)
stars keep not their motion in one sphere Nor can one England brook a double reign Of Harry Percy and the Prince of Wales.' For Julia bore, Cut off by fate unpitying,This had taken place in B.C. 54, about five years before the action of the poem opens. the bond Of that ill-omened marriage and the pledge Of blood united, to the shades below. Hadst thou but longer stayed, it had been thine To keep the parent and the spouse apart, Strike sword from grasp and join the threatening hands; As Sabine matrons in the days of old Joined in the midst the bridegroom and the sire. With thee all trust was buried, and the chiefs Could give their courage vent, and rushed to war. Lest newer glories triumphs past obscure, Late conquered Gaul the bays from pirates won, This, Magnus, is thy fear; thy roll of fame, Of glorious deeds accomplished for the state Allows no equal; nor will Caesar's pride A prior rival in his triumphs brook; Which had the right 'twere impious to enquire; Each for his cause
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley), book 2, line 326 (search)
t The bride was carried over the threshold of her new home, for to stumble on it would be of evil omen. Plutarch ('Romulus') refers this custom to the rape of the Sabine women, who were 'so lift up and carried away by force.' (North, volume i., p. 88, Edition by Windham.) I have read vetuit in this passage, though vitat appears toame, Wearing the garb of sorrow, while the wool Covered the purple border of her robe, Thus was she wedded. As she greets her sons She greets her husband. Nor, in Sabine use Did mournful Cato share the festal taunt: Nor friend nor foe was bidden : silent both They joined in marriage, yet content, unseen By any save by Brutus. Sad in Ocean. On the Alps Whose spurs strike plainwards, and on fields of Gaul The cloudy heights of Apennine look down In further distance: on his nearer slopes The Sabine turns the ploughshare; Umbrian kine And Marsian fatten; with his pineclad rocks He girds the tribes of Latium, nor leaves Hesperia's soil until the waves that bea