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Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 30 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 20 0 Browse Search
Titus Livius (Livy), History of Rome, books 1-10 (ed. Rev. Canon Roberts) 14 0 Browse Search
Q. Horatius Flaccus (Horace), Odes (ed. John Conington) 14 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Leonard C. Smithers) 8 0 Browse Search
C. Valerius Catullus, Carmina (ed. Sir Richard Francis Burton) 6 0 Browse Search
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Arthur Golding) 6 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Sabine (United States) or search for Sabine (United States) in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Red River expedition. (search)
now urgent business. It was proposed to dam the river above and send the fleet through a sluice in the manner of running logs by lumbermen. Porter did not believe in the feasibility of the project; but Lieut.-Col. Joseph Bailey (q. v.) performed the service successfully. The whole expedition then proceeded towards the Mississippi, where Porter resumed the service of patrolling that stream. The forces of Banks were placed under the charge of Gen. E. R. S. Canby, on the Atchafalaya, and Gen. A. J. Smith's The fleet passing the Dam. troops returned to Mississippi. A strong confronting force of Confederates had kept Steele from co-operating with the expedition. He had moved from Little Rock with 8,000 men, pushed back the Confederates, and on April 15 had captured the important post at Camden, on the Wachita River; but after a severe battle at Jenkinson's Ferry, on the Sabine River, he had abandoned Camden and returned to Little Rock. So ended the disastrous Red River campaign.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Louisiana, (search)
Louisiana, The central gulf State of the United States, has for its southern boundary the Gulf of Mexico, and south of 31° N. it extends from the Sabine River on the west to the Pearl River on the east, about 250 miles. North of lat. 31° N. its eastern boundary is the Mississippi River, which separates it from Mississippi, and the Sabine River and Texas form its western boundary. That portion of the State lying east of the Mississippi River is bounded on the north by the State of MississippiSabine River and Texas form its western boundary. That portion of the State lying east of the Mississippi River is bounded on the north by the State of Mississippi, and that west of the Mississippi River by Arkansas. Lat. 28° 56' to 33° N., and long. 89° to 94° W. Area, 45,420 square miles, in ninety-nine parishes. Population, 1890, 1,118,587; 1900, 1,381,625. Capital, Baton Rouge. It differs from the other States in that its jurisprudence is based on the Roman or civil law instead of the common law of England, and the counties are called parishes. Robert Cavalier de la Salle descends the Mississippi to its mouth, names the country Louisiana, and <