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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 178 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 84 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 32 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 14 0 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 12 0 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 10 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II.. You can also browse the collection for , Mo. (Missouri, United States) or search for , Mo. (Missouri, United States) in all documents.

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dging many times his force, who were after him, rested a while that night 5 miles north-east of Paoli, and escaped next day into the timber of the middle fork of Grand river, Missouri; where his band scattered, seeking and finding concealment with congenial spirits throughout the surrounding region. Perhaps 100 of them were overtaken and killed in the pursuit; but the greater number escaped, and were soon indistinguishable. Col. Woodson, with 600 Missourians, starting Aug. 21. from Pilot Knob, Mo., dashed into Pocahontas, Aug. 24. Ark., where he captured Gen M. Jeff. Thompson and some 50 others; returning unmolested. The surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, with the retreat of Jo. Johnston from Jackson, having left Gen. Grant's army at leisure, Maj.-Gen. F. Steele was sent to Helena, July 31. to fit out and lead an expedition for the capture of little Rock. The force assigned him for this task numbered 6,000 men of all arms, including 500 cavalry, with 22 guns; bu
Halleck, and sent to St. Louis to strengthen Rosecrans. Price entered south-eastern Missouri by way of Poplar bluffs and Bloomfield; advancing unresisted to Pilot Knob, where he was first withstood Sept. 27. by a brigade, commanded by Gen. Hugh S. Ewing. Here were Fort Davidson and some other rude works; and Ewing made an enveloped the city on all sides save that of the river; but, on a full survey of the defenses, and a partial glimpse of the men behind them, with the lesson of Pilot Knob fresh in his mind, lie concluded not to attack, but, after giving time for his train to move around the city and ret a start on the road westward, he drew off asuperior force may be used. There is no reason why Gen. Rosecrans should not have concentrated his forces and beaten and driven Price before the latter reached Pilot Knob. As the concentration hero suggested, in the face of a formidable army of veterans, mainly mounted, and moving with great celerity, would, if practicable.
C., 482. New Bridge, Va., 141. New Creek, W. Va., 598. New Hope Church, Ga., 620 New Madrid, Mo., 54. Newnan, Ga., 633. Newtonia, Mo., 37; 561. North of Farmville, Va., 742. Okolona, Miss., 617. Old River, La., 328. Oldtown, Md., 607. Opelousas, La., 340. Orangeburg, S. C., 699. Orchard Ridge, Tenn., 438. Padueah, Ky., 618. Paine's X-Roads, Va., 740. Palmetto Ranche, Tex., 757. Parker's X-roads, Tenn., 283. Petersburg Lines, Va., 734. Philadelphia. Tenn., 431. Pilot Knob, Mo., 557. Pine Bluff, Ark., 453. Pineville, Mo., 450. Plaquemine, La., 338. Pleasant Grove. La., 541. Plymouth, N. C., 533. Pocahontas, Ark., 451. Pocotaligo, S. C., 463. Pomeroy. Ohio, 406. Poolesville, Md., 352. Port Conway, Va., 394. Port Gibson, Miss., 297. Port Republic. Va., 139. Ponnd Gap, Ky., 42. Prairie d'anne. Ark., 552. Prestonburg. Ky., 42. Pulaski, Tenn., 678. Quaker Road. Va., 730. Rappahannock Station, 394. Reams's do. (Wilson), 588. Red Hill,