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William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 6: Louisiana. 1859-1861. (search)
ever tried to induce me to take part in steps designed to lead toward disunion. I think my general opinions were well known and understood, viz., that secession was treason, was war; and that in no event could the North and West permit the Mississippi River to pass out of their control. But some men at the South actually supposed at the time that the Northwestern States, in case of a disruption of the General Government, would be drawn in self. interest to an alliance with the South. What Iassembled, on the faith of a telegraphic dispatch sent by the two Senators, Benjamin and Slidell, from their seats in the United States Senate at Washington, Governor Moore ordered the seizure of all the United States forts at the mouth of the Mississippi and Lake Pontchartrain, and of the United States arsenal at Baton Rouge. The forts had no garrisons, but the arsenal was held by a small company of artillery, commanded by Major Haskins, a most worthy and excellent officer, who had lost an ar
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
Bussey, etc., etc. Though it was mid-winter, General Halleck was pushing his preparations most vigorously, and surely he brought order out of chaos in St. Louis with commendable energy. I remember, one night, sitting in his room, on the second floor of the Planters' House, with him and General Cullum, his chief of staff, talking of things generally, and the subject then was of the much-talked — of advance, as soon as the season would permit. Most people urged the movement down the Mississippi River; but Generals Polk and Pillow had a large rebel force, with heavy guns in a very strong position, at Columbus, Kentucky, about eighteen miles below Cairo. Commodore Foote had his gunboat fleet at Cairo; and General U. S. Grant, who commanded the district, was collecting a large force at Paducah, Cairo, and Bird's Point. General Halleck had a map on his table, with a large pencil in his hand, and asked, Where is the rebel line? Cullum drew the pencil through Bowling Green, Forts Donel
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 9: battle of Shiloh. March and April, 1862. (search)
Paducah a division for myself when allowed to take the field, which I had been promised by General Halleek. His purpose was evidently to operate up the Tennessee River, to break up Bear Creek Bridge and the railroad communications between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, and no doubt lie was provoked that Generals Grant and Smith had turned aside to Nashville. In the mean time several of the gunboats, under Captain Phelps, United States Navy, had gone up the Tennessee as far as Florence,an invading army; that our purpose was to move forward in force, make a lodgment on the Memphis & Charleston road, and thus repeat the grand tactics of Fort Donelson, by separating the rebels in the interior from those at Memphis and on the Mississippi River. We did not fortify our camps against an attack, because we had no orders to do so, and because such a course would have made our raw men timid. The position was naturally strong, with Snake Creek on our right, a deep, bold stream, with a
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 12 (search)
rmy of the Mississippi, commanded by Major-General John Pope, was moving directly down the Mississippi River, against that portion of the rebel line which, under Generals Polk and Pillow, had fallen r large sea-going fleet, and with the cooperating army of General Butler, was entering the Mississippi River by the Passes, and preparing to reduce Forts Jackson and St, Philip in order to reach New Orleans; so that all minds were turned to the conquest of the Mississippi River, and surely adequate means were provided for the undertaking. The battle of Shiloh had been fought, as described, onbile, or Vicksburg, or anywhere in that region, which would by one move have solved the whole Mississippi problem; and, from what he then told me, I believe he intended such a campaign, but was overr's division next below on the river-bank by reason of the scarcity of water, except in the Mississippi River itself. The weather was intensely hot. The same order that took us to Memphis required me
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
ivil population would become a dead weight on our hands. Inasmuch as the Mississippi River was then in our possession northward, and steamboats were freely plying ws ultimate object was to capture Vicksburg, to open the navigation of the Mississippi River, and that General Halleck had authorized him to call on the troops in thethere, and that portion of General Curtis's forces at present east of the Mississippi River, and organize them into brigades and divisions in your own way. As soo. In the present instance, our object is to secure the navigation of the Mississippi River and its main branches, and to hold them as military channels of communica orders from the War Department to command the expeditionary force on the Mississippi River. I explained what had been done, and what was the actual state of facts;onvoyed by the gunboats, of which three were iron-clads, proceeded up the Mississippi River to the mouth of White River, which we reached January 8th. On the next d
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 14 (search)
omas Williams the summer before, the object being to turn the Mississippi River at that point, or at least to make a passage for our fleet ofto give his personal supervison to the whole movement. The Mississippi River was very high and rising, and we began that system of canals art of Stuart's division to proceed in the large boats up the Mississippi River to a point at Gwin's plantation, where a bend of Steele's Baygunboats, and to escape with his men through the swamp to the Mississippi River. There being no longer any sharp-shooters to bother the sailthe main army to march by land down the country inland of the Mississippi River; while the gunboat-fleet and a minor land-force should threatown the bluff, so as to make connection with our fleet in the Mississippi River. There was a good deal of desultory fighting that evening, af the civil war — the recovery of the complete control of the Mississippi River, from its source to its mouth — or, in the language of Mr. Li
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 15 (search)
tanooga and Knoxville. July to December, 1863. After the fall of Vicksburg, and its corollary, Port Hudson, the Mississippi River was wholly in the possession of the Union forces, and formed a perfect line of separation in the territories of ourM. Major-General S. A. Hurlbut, Memphis: All the troops that can possibly be spared in West Tennessee and on the Mississippi River should be sent without delay to assist General Rosecrans on the Tennessee River. Urge Sherman to act with all poher causes prevented further operations after the battle of Stone River. Last spring, when your movements on the Mississippi River had drawn out of Tennessee a large force of the enemy, I again urged General Rosecrans to take advantage of that opand most important campaign of the war, it became necessary to set free as many of the old troops serving along the Mississippi River as possible. This was the real object and purpose of the Meridian campaign, and of Banks's expedition up Red River
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 16 (search)
embraced substantially the territory on the east bank of the Mississippi River, from Natchez up to the Ohio River, and thence along the Tenncase to General Grant, who consented that I might go down the Mississippi River, where the bulk of my command lay, and strike a blow on the eThe ice was forming fast, and there was great danger that the Mississippi River would become closed to navigation. Admiral Porter, who was ay wounded at Shiloh. Returning to Cairo, we started down the Mississippi River, which was full of floating ice. With the utmost difficulty wo charter twenty-five steamboats for the Red River trip. The Mississippi River, though low for the season, is free of ice and in good boatine the rebel forces that we could take from the defense of the Mississippi River the equivalent of a corps of twenty thousand men, to be used spare them the moment you can, trying to get them back to the Mississippi River in thirty days from the time they actually enter Red River.
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 17 (search)
f General Buell should be assigned to me specifically I was prepared to assign him to command all the troops on the Mississippi River from Cairo to Natchez, comprising about three divisions, or the equivalent of a corps d'armee. General Grant never Corps, vice Gordon Granger to avail himself of his leave of absence; and General Slocum was to be ordered down the Mississippi River, to command the District of Vicksburg. These changes required the consent of the President, and were all in due tie, viz., the early part of April, I was much disturbed by a bold raid made by the rebel General Forrest up between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers. He reached the Ohio River at Paducah, but was handsomely repulsed by Colonel Hicks. He then swrrest, availing himself of the absence of our furloughed men and of the detachment with you, has pushed up between the Mississippi and Tennessee Rivers, even to the Ohio. He attacked Paducah, but got the worst of it, and he still lingers about the
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 2, chapter 20 (search)
ver-loyal to the South. I will therefore give it as my opinion that your army and Canby's should be reinforced to the maximum; that, after you get Wilmington, you should strike for Savannah and its river; that General Canby should hold the Mississippi River, and send a force to take Columbus, Georgia, either by way of the Alabama or Appalachicola River; that I should keep Hood employed and put my army in fine order for a march on Augusta, Columbia, and Charleston; and start as soon as Wilmingtssouri except as raiders; and the truth is, that General Rosecrans should be ashamed to take my troops for such a purpose. If you will secure Wilmington and the city of Savannah from your centre, and let General Canby have command over the Mississippi River and country west of it, I will send a force to the Alabama and Appalachicola, provided you give me one hundred thousand of the drafted men to fill up my old regiments; and if you will fix a day to be in Savannah, I will insure our possessio
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