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new triumphs await us in the cause of progress and civilization. Thus have we passed from infancy to childhood, from childhood to robust and buoyant youth, and from youth to vigorous manhood, and with an overgrowth so superabundant, we should neither be surprised nor alarmed that we have provoked foreign envy as well as unwilling admiration — that cankers of discontent are gnawing at our heart-strings, and that we are threatened with cheeks, and trials, and reverses. The continent of North America presents to the observing mind one great geographical system, every portion of which, under the present facilities for intercommunication, may be more accessible to every other than were the original States to each other at the time the confederacy was formed. It is destined at no distant day to become permanently the commercial centre, when France and England will pay tribute to New York, and the Rothschilds and the Barings will sell exchange on Wall street at a premium; and it require
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 95.-General Polk's General order. (search)
unes and the destruction of lives, for the subjugation of Christian freemen is out of the question. A war which has thus no motive except lust or hate, and no object except ruin and devastation, under the shallow pretence of the restoration of the Union, is surely a war against Heaven as well as a war against earth. Of all the absurdities ever enacted, of all the hypocrisies ever practised, an attempt to restore a union of minds, and hearts, and wills, like that which once existed in North America, by the ravages of fire and sword, is assuredly among the most prodigious. As sure as there is a righteous Ruler of the Universe, such a war must end in disaster to those by whom it was inaugurated, and by whom it is now prosecuted with circumstances of barbarity which, it is fondly believed, would never more disgrace the annals of a civilized people. Numbers may be against us, but the battle is not always to the strong. Justice will triumph, and an earnest of this triumph is already
Doc. 110.-a protest from South Carolina. A letter from L. W. Spratt. Hon. John Perkins, Delegate from Louisiana: From the abstract of the Constitution for the Provisional Government, published in the papers of this morning, it appears that the slave trade, except with the Slave States of North America, shall be prohibited. The Congress, therefore, not content with the laws of the late United States against it, which, it is to be presumed, were re-adopted, have unalterably fixed the subject by a provision of the Constitution. That provision, for reasons equally conclusive, will doubtless pass into the Constitution of the Permanent Government. The prohibition, therefore, will no longer be a question of policy, but will be a cardinal principle of the Southern Confederacy. It will not be a question for the several States, in view of any peculiarity in their circumstances and condition, but will be fixed by a paramount power, which nothing but another revolution can overtur
rate States was engaged in the formation of their Constitution, I find a protest from South Carolina against a decision of that Congress in relation to the slave-trede, in The Charleston Mercury of Feb. 13. It is written by L. W. Spratt, to the Hon. John Perkins, delegate from Louisiana. It begins in this way: From the abstract of the Constitution for the Provisional Government, published in the papers this morning, it appears that the slave-trade, except with the Slave States of North America, shall be prohibited. The Congress, therefore, not content with the laws of the late United States against it, which, it is to be presumed, were readopted, have unalterably fixed the subject, by a provision of the Constitution. He goes on and protests. We all know that that Constitution is made for the day, just for the time being, a mere tub thrown out to the whale, to amuse and entertain the public mind for a time. We know this to be so. But in making his argument, what does he s