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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,632 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 998 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 232 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 156 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 142 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 134 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 130 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 130 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.). You can also browse the collection for Europe or search for Europe in all documents.

Your search returned 45 results in 7 document sections:

Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Advertisement (search)
art of the successes of Frederick! If such books have been able to contribute to the propagation of this error, it must be owned however that they contributed also to perfecting the regulations of 1791 on manoeuvres, the only result which it was possible to expect from them. Such was the art of war at the commencement of the 19th century, when Porbeck, Venturini and Bulow published some pamphlets on the first campaigns of the Revolution. The latter especially made a certain sensation in Europe by his Spirit of the System of Modern Warfare, the work of a man of genius, but which was merely sketched, and which added nothing to the first notions given by Lloyd. At the same time appeared also in Germany, under the modest title of an introduction to the study of the military art, a valuable work by M. de Laroche-Aymon, veritable enclyclopedia for all the branches of the art, strategy excepted, which is there scarcely indicated; but despite this omission, it is none the less one of the
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 1: the policy of war. (search)
anish nation; nevertheless it was, one of the most contested by all Europe; it produced a general coalition against the legitimate legatee. ent, she would have decided more surely and more easily the fate of Europe. If interventions are of different natures, the wars which resulgreat alliance for assisting in its defence; it was assailed by all Europe, both by land and by sea. In view of such examples, of what inteught to spread the famous declaration of the rights of man over all Europe, and governments, justly alarmed, took up arms doubtless with the oxander and Napoleon, sustained gigantic struggles against coalesced Europe. When such struggles arise from voluntary aggressions which could ns which had alarmed all his neighbors. He could oppose to leagued Europe only the faithful alliance of the Elector of Bavaria, and the more exander in 1812, were almost impossible to avoid. France had all Europe on her hands in 1793, in consequence of the extravagant provocation
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 2: military policy, or the philosophy of war. (search)
up with mountains, whereas, there exists scarcely one more flat in Europe, as soon as you have crossed the belt of secondary mountains with w of his Memoirs, in describing the frontiers of the great states of Europe has not been happy in his sayings and his predictions; he sees obst Russian general, commanding troops the most solidly constituted in Europe, may undertake every thing in open field against undisciplined and with the same troops, will not be able to dare every thing against European armies, having the same instruction, and nearly the same disciplinsposition. After long intervals of peace, it might chance that no European general should have commanded-in-chief. In this case, it would bethe operations of the armies; there has never been but one voice in Europe upon the fatal effects which have resulted from it; is it wrong or Russian army in this respect, may serve as a model for all those of Europe, and the steadiness which it has displayed in all its retreats, bel
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 3: strategy. (search)
was it due that it did not change the face of Europe? When the Prussians arrived towards the endassertion. Napoleon, without an army, had all Europe upon his back, and the nation itself had separ the devastations of the peoples which overran Europe from the 4th to the 13th century. However, itoths and Mongols, which successively traversed Europe, and how they lived on their marches. In thhat I mean to speak here only of wars between European nations which know how to manoeuvre; one might not being to offer the military geography of Europe, we shall limit ourselves to presenting the geight, was the most formidable place of arms in Europe; but as it would require a garrison of twenty-oops were assembling at the two extremities of Europe, Napoleon has ordered the evacuation of Naplestory alone that we can obtain lessons. When Europe was half covered with forests; pasture-groundsto transport the regular armies of the half of Europe, from the banks of the Rhine to the banks of t[6 more...]
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Chapter 6: logistics, or the practical art of moving armies. (search)
ining its resources and its means of every kind. At this day, geography, topography and statistics have made so much progress that these reconnoissances are less necessary than formerly; meanwhile they will always be of great utility, so long as Europe shall not be registered: now it is probable she will never be so. There exist many good instructions upon these kinds of reconnoissances, to which I must refer my readers. The others are those which are ordered for assuring ourselves of the moe at the head of an army, I have been, at least, chief of staff of nearly a hundred thousand men, and called many times to the councils of the greatest sovereigns of our day, in which it was the question to direct the masses of the whole of armed Europe, and I have been deceived but two or three times in the hypotheses I have laid down, and in the manner of resolving the questions which resulted from them. I am even convinced that every question well laid down, is almost always easy to resolve
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), chapter 7 (search)
his arm. It must be owned, this organization left little to be desired, and that grand army, which effected such great things, was soon the type upon which all Europe was modeled. Some military men, dreaming of the perfectibility of the art, would have desired that the infantry division, called sometimes to fight by itself, ranks for deployed lines, an army being scarcely able to have two modes of formation, or at least to employ them alternately on the field of battle. Hence what European army (if we except the English) could be risked to deploy in lines of two ranks? It would be necessary in this case never to move but in column of attack. I and as if to make reparation to the artillery, he sustains now that it is henceforth to decide battles, and to become for that purpose even the principal arm of European armies. As I have recognized at all times the part that a well employed artillery may have in victories, I am very much disposed to admit with the author, tha
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.), Sketch of the principal maritime expeditions. (search)
er this triumph, Rome ruled in Africa as well as in Europe; but its empire was momentarily shaken in Asia by Mime at which the people of the East were overruning Europe, those of Scandinavia began to visit the coast of Ecan populations, visited in their turn the South of Europe. The Moors crossed in 712 the Straits of Gibraltarle events, when an enthusiastic priest animates all Europe with a fanatical infatuation, and precipitates it uies of troops which the Italian marine brought from Europe, were ready to succumb anew under the blows of Salaere too happy in buying permission to ro-embark for Europe. The Court oft Rome, which found it to its interTurks by sending twenty thousand men to Candia; but Europe sustained her feebly, and the republic had put fortng up with the progress which naval tactics made in Europe, had over the stationary musselmans a marked superie epoch of the greatest maritime efforts of France; Europe did not see, without astonishment, that power send