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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,632 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 998 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 232 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 156 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 142 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 134 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 130 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 130 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Europe or search for Europe in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

ake a stubborn defence, this superiority might have been overcome. The conduct of the rebels is indeed beyond comprehension. Here is a place commanding several important railroads; a place the seizure of which Beauregard confessed in his celebrated despatch to Davis, would open to us the Valley of the Mississippi; a position capable of a stubborn defence as Sebastopol, and yet scarcely an effort is made to fortify it, and its possessors fly at our approach. The abettors of the rebels in Europe are watching with eager interest every step made in this country, with a view of obtaining a recognition, at any favorable moment, of the bogus confederacy. A stubborn resistance, even though followed by defeat, would command respect abroad; but a succession of evacuations, upon the slightest approach of danger, can insure only contempt. The troops from every direction marched toward a common centre — Corinth; and as they neared each other and friends recognized friends, whom they had no
e sold sterling exchange for confederate treasury notes, and then bought these sugars with the notes. Now this is claimed to be strictly mercantile. It will not be denied that the sugars were intended for a foreign market. But the Government of the United States had said that with the port of New-Orleans there should be no strictly mercantile transactions. It would not be conceded for a moment that the exchanging of specie for confederate treasury notes, and sending the specie to Europe, to enable the rebels to buy arms and munitions of war there, were not a breach of the blockade, as well as a violation of the neutrality laws and the proclamation of their majesties, the Queen of Great Britain and the Emperor of France. What distinguishes the two cases, save that drawing the sterling bills is a more safe and convenient way of eluding the laws than sending bullion in specie, and thus assist the rebellion in the point of its utmost need? It will be claimed that to assist
hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets would be bliss to this, and to fall where tyrants strode would be to consecrate the spot anew and wash it of every stain. . . . . The loss of Richmond in Europe would sound like the loss of Paris or London, and the moral effect will scarcely be less. Let us, therefore, avert the great disaster by a reliance on ourselves. It is better that Richmond should fall as the capital of the Confederacy, than thaeasure that the Brigadier-General commanding the First division, announces to the officers and men of the command, his entire satisfaction with the manner in which they fought in the bloody battles of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh. No troops in Europe could have done better. The insolent enemy, flushed with the late successes, choosing their own position, and led by their most talented generals, have been met in desperate contest and hurled from the soil they had invaded. We have borne no
lose Virginia, and to lose Virginia is to lose the key to the Southern Confederacy. Virginians, Marylanders, ye who have rallied to her defence, would it not be better to fall in her streets than to basely abandon them, and view from the surrounding hills the humiliation of the capital of the Southern Confederacy? To die in her streets would be bliss to this, and to fall where tyrants strode would be to consecrate the spot anew and wash it of every stain. . . . . The loss of Richmond in Europe would sound like the loss of Paris or London, and the moral effect will scarcely be less. Let us, therefore, avert the great disaster by a reliance on ourselves. It is better that Richmond should fall as the capital of the Confederacy, than that Richmond exist the depot of the hireling horde of the North. But Richmond can be defended, and saved from pollution. The fate of the capital of the Confederacy rests with the people. The next few days may decide the fate of Richmond. It is ei
ed dead, will not be unmindful of the honors due to the living. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. General Wilcox's order. headquarters Ninth army corps, Antietam Creek, September 22, 1862. General order No. 12.--It is with the greatest pleasure that the Brigadier-General commanding the First division, announces to the officers and men of the command, his entire satisfaction with the manner in which they fought in the bloody battles of South-Mountain and Sharpsburgh. No troops in Europe could have done better. The insolent enemy, flushed with the late successes, choosing their own position, and led by their most talented generals, have been met in desperate contest and hurled from the soil they had invaded. We have borne no mean part in these victories, won for the glorious Union and Constitution, without which life is worth nothing, and for the defence of which we are still ready to die. Soldiers! In our rejoicings let us drop a manly tear for those who have fallen