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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1,632 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 998 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 232 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 156 0 Browse Search
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary 142 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 138 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 134 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 130 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 1 130 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 126 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life. You can also browse the collection for Europe or search for Europe in all documents.

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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 1: discontinuance of the guide-board (search)
on should surely be allowed henceforth to wind up his story in his own way, without formal proclamation of his moral; or, better still, to leave the tale without technical and elaborate winding up, as nature leaves her stories. His work is a great one, to bring comedy and even tragedy down from the old traditions of kingliness to the vaster and more complex currents of modern democratic life. When the elder Scaliger wrote, in 1561, that work on Poetry which so long ruled the traditions of European literature, he defined the difference between tragedy and comedy to consist largely in this — that tragedy concerned itself only with kings, princes, cities, citadels, and camps; in tragoedia reges, principles, ex urbibus, arcibus, castris. All these things are now changed. Kings, princes, camps, citadels are passing away, and the cities that will soon alone survive them are filled with a democratic world, which awaits its chronicles of joy or pain. The writer of fiction must tell his tal
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 10: Favorites of a day (search)
ble him, particularly as it never reached him. In the same way the authors who have come here to lecture have inevitably gauged each place by their own audiences; as Matthew Arnold thought that Worcester, Massachusetts, must be a small and trivial town because he had but few to hear him, and was left at a hotel, but regarded Haverhill as a great and promising city, because he was entertained at a private house and had a good audience. The tradewind of prestige and influence still blows from Europe hither; the American author does not expect money from England, for instance, but values its praise or blame; while the Englishman is glad of the money, but cares little for the criticism, since he rarely sees it. What is hard for authors, foreign or native, to understand is that fame is apt to be most transitory where it is readiest, and that they should make hay while the sun shines. A year ago the bookseller's monthly returns, as seen in The Bookman and elsewhere, gave the leadership
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 12: the next step in journalism (search)
But this habit of vicarious description did not disappear with the civil war; it is just as prevalent to-day in times of peace. Let any one compare the references to himself or herself in the newspapers-and who is so humble as not to appear sometimes in the society columns?-and it will become evident that they not only are often wide of the truth, but are often so diametrically opposite as to destroy each other. You are in the city and in the country on the same day; you have sailed for Europe and are driving in a fourhand among the Berkshire Hills. A gentleman with whom I should be well acquainted used to carry in his pocket two scraps cut within a fortnight from two metropolitan newspapers, the one describing him as a man without a gray hair in his head, and the other as a man possessing a remarkably fine head of snow-white locks. Should his biography ever be written, it is a matter of chance which description will come into the record as the unimpeachable testimony of an eye
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 13: the dream of the republic (search)
Central and Southern America, for instance, make a mistake when their successive states declared independence of various European nations and set up republics? Or would it have been better had they all remained — as Cuba is — under the government ofdition, it finds least approval among the very people who ought best to know its value — the colonists who go forth from Europe. Great Britain is, indeed, the only European nation which sends forth its children on a really enormous scale. Now, theEuropean nation which sends forth its children on a really enormous scale. Now, these self-exiled people ought clearly, if they know what is good for them, to seek out some English colony. These colonies are to be found all over the world; there is no habitable zone where a person or a family leaving Great Britain may not settle dt as republics, and work out their own salvation; or whether we wish for them the probable fate of the Boer republic, as European colonies. Dr. Jameson, taking his way back to England nominally a prisoner, was immediately sung as a hero by the new p<
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 15: the cant of cosmopolitanism (search)
ch they are a portion has its own career to work out; that nothing that can be learned or won in Europe is too good for us, but that you can no more transplant the social atmosphere of Europe than youEurope than you can change the climate or the sky. They learn also the folly of supposing that cosmopolitanism means good manners, or has, indeed, very much to do with them. Perhaps, if we hear a man mentioned a the most essentially vulgar women ever seen in American society have been those most versed in European drawing-rooms, and, by all testimony, not unpopular there. The brilliant Lady Eastlake went son circles of really good manners, some of the Americans who have been most cordially received in Europe, from the Revolutionary days until the present time, have been those who did not go abroad untilbeen formed wholly at home. The late Richard Grant White always maintained that he never saw in Europe manners so fine as those of his own grandfather, in New England; and when he himself first visit
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 16: Anglomania and Anglophobia (search)
ght up foolishly for imitation, but more often wisely. Yet even among the class most charged with it the costliest things, the domestic architecture, the furniture, the internal decorations of houses, are almost all brought from the continent of Europe, not from England; while we go mainly to France for pictures and to Germany for science, very much as if England did not exist. In all this there is properly no element of liking or disliking, but merely the natural impulse of a newer nation to h this petty literary antagonism has done to furnish fuel for the so-called jingo side in a world where the gospel of turning the other cheek to the smiter is yet imperfectly established. When we speak of England as isolated among the nations of Europe is it possible to forget how long the arrogance of the typical Englishman has been isolating itself? Surprise is felt that France, amid the rumors of wars, should turn to Germany, which so lately humiliated her, and should turn from England, whi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 19: the problem of drudgery (search)
odkin's Political and Economic Essays-thinks that the labor problem is really insoluble, because it is truly the problem of making the manual laborers of the world content with their lot. But how many a man of wealth in this country works willingly on a scale which would appall any day-laborer, and this simply from love of the exertion; and is only glad when a portion of it may come in the form of actual manual labor, even as Charles V. was glad to turn away from the task of governing half Europe to devote himself to clock-making. One looks round in vain to find a pursuit without drudgery. Which is the more exhausting, for Mr. Bryan to travel day and night over the land to meet his admirers, or for Mr. McKinley to stay at home and receive delegations of his by the thousand? As a matter of personal happiness, is the Presidency, or the ghost of a chance of the Presidency, worth either? Three promising and successful members of the Lower House of Congress from a single State, with
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 20: classes and masses (search)
stem what is practically a tenantry, with a group remaining in the village of what were once farming families, but who now obtain, by trade with the city people, or work done for them, a better living than the farms ever yielded. All this is not the result of any tyranny or mortgage-grasping, but of simple purchase and transfer acceptable to all classes; there is the best of feeling, but it points to a vast and far-reaching change of tenure. Nothing apparently can sustain what is called in Europe peasant proprietorship except those iron laws which in France subdivide the inheritence of real estate into as many strips as there are children in a household — a method that would be utterly intolerable to the American mind. The upshot of it all is, that while our Constitution and general laws are secure, our social structure is still fluid and changing before our eyes, and our wisest advisers cannot yet tell us just what is to be the outcome. The impending changes imply some evil, and y
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 21: international marriages (search)
ection with those aroused whenever a rich American buys a castle in Europe, or even leases a shooting preserve in Scotland. All these are chie here, and discover that they can get much more for their money in Europe. This was acutely pointed out by our best critic, Mr. Bryce, who mom rank, everything in English society, or even that of Continental Europe, gives to wealth an advantage which it may never claim here. The vrally to be where that privilege is largest; and this is clearly in Europe, not in America. Women, to whom the external charm of aristocraticn English liberals sometimes tell us, that the great show-places of Europe are worth what they cost to the whole community simply as public paat individual wealth among Americans is greater in proportion than European wealth, because the latter is almost always encumbered with the neup costly establishments. Much of it, no doubt, will float back to Europe by change of residence or international marriages, and will serve e
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 27: the antidote to money (search)
Chapter 27: the antidote to money One can hardly read the letters from Europe describing fashionable society without discovering that it is perfectly possible for Americans, even those who have been regarded at home as rather vulgar and pushing, to get at least far enough in the English circles of fashion to see and describe the grandest functions. How the knowledge is obtained is not the question. Like the snubbed man of the world in the inimitable Dolly Dialogues, these witnesses may afe, like the Radical and Irish members, by special contribution. It is really a very simple matter, though it puzzled Matthew Arnold, that men and women who take the English view that wealth is primarily a means of personal luxury should live in Europe. How can they help it? To those who incline, however moderately, to what is still a very common American view, that wealth is to be viewed as being in a manner a public trust, there seems every reason why they should live at home, and why, more
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