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Browsing named entities in Plato, Hippias Major, Hippias Minor, Ion, Menexenus, Cleitophon, Timaeus, Critias, Minos, Epinomis. You can also browse the collection for Asia or search for Asia in all documents.

Your search returned 11 results in 8 document sections:

Plato, Menexenus, section 239b (search)
deeming it their duty to fight in the cause of freedom alike with Greeks on behalf of Greeks and with barbarians on behalf of the whole of Greece. The story of how they repulsed EumolpusEumolpus, a Tracian bard and chieftain, son of Poseidon, said to have aided the Eleusinians in invading Attica. and the Amazons,The Amazons, a race of female warriors in Pontus, said to have attacked Athens and been driven back to Asia by the hero Theseus. and still earlier invaders, when they marched upon our country, and how they defended the Argives against the Cadmeiansi.e. in the war of “the Seven against Thebes” (of which city Cadmus was the founder). and the Heracleidae against the Argives,The Athenians aided “the sons of Heracles” against Eurystheus, King of Tiryns in Argolis. is a story which our time is too short to relate as it deserves, and already their valor has been adequately celebrated in song by poets who have made it known throughout the
Plato, Menexenus, section 239d (search)
The Persians were in command of Asia, and were enslaving Europe, when they came in contact with the children of this land, our own parents, of whom it is right and proper that we should make mention first and celebrate their valor. But if we are to celebrate it fitly, in order to visualize it we must place ourselves, in thought, at that epoch when the whole of Asia was already in bondage to the third of the Persian kings. Cyrus,Cyrus overthrew the Medes in 559, and reigned till 529 B.C. the fiom it is right and proper that we should make mention first and celebrate their valor. But if we are to celebrate it fitly, in order to visualize it we must place ourselves, in thought, at that epoch when the whole of Asia was already in bondage to the third of the Persian kings. Cyrus,Cyrus overthrew the Medes in 559, and reigned till 529 B.C. the first of these kings, had by his own spirited action set free his fellow-countrymen, the Persians, and not only enslaved the Medes, their masters,
Plato, Menexenus, section 239e (search)
but also gained command of the rest of Asia, as far as to Egypt. His sonCambyses, son of Cyrus, 529-522 B.C. ruled over Egypt and as much of Libya as he could traverse; while the third king, Darius, extended his empire by land as far as to the Scythians, and by his navy controlled the sea and the islands,
Plato, Menexenus, section 240d (search)
made no move. It is by realizing this position of affairs that we can appreciate what manner of men those were, in point of valor, who awaited the onset of the barbarians' power, chastised all Asia's insolent pride, and were the first to rear trophies of victory over the barbarians; whereby they pointed the way to the others and taught them to know that the Persian power was not invincible, since there is no multitude of men or money but courage conquers it.
Plato, Timaeus, section 24b (search)
is kept apart from all the other classes, being enjoined by the law to devote itself solely to the work of training for war. A further feature is the character of their equipment with shields and spears; for we were the first of the peoples of AsiaEgypt being reckoned part of Asia. to adopt these weapons, it being the Goddess who instructed us, even as she instructed you first of all the dwellers in yonder lands. Again, with regard to wisdom, you perceive, no doubt, the law here—how much at apart from all the other classes, being enjoined by the law to devote itself solely to the work of training for war. A further feature is the character of their equipment with shields and spears; for we were the first of the peoples of AsiaEgypt being reckoned part of Asia. to adopt these weapons, it being the Goddess who instructed us, even as she instructed you first of all the dwellers in yonder lands. Again, with regard to wisdom, you perceive, no doubt, the law here—how much attent
Plato, Timaeus, section 24e (search)
nitude and for nobleness. For it is related in our records how once upon a time your State stayed the course of a mighty host, which, starting from a distant point in the Atlantic ocean, was insolently advancing to attack the whole of Europe, and Asia to boot. For the ocean there was at that time navigable; for in front of the mouth which you Greeks call, as you say, 'the pillars of Heracles,'i.e., the Straits of Gibraltar. there lay an island which was larger than Libyai.e., Africa. and Asia stant point in the Atlantic ocean, was insolently advancing to attack the whole of Europe, and Asia to boot. For the ocean there was at that time navigable; for in front of the mouth which you Greeks call, as you say, 'the pillars of Heracles,'i.e., the Straits of Gibraltar. there lay an island which was larger than Libyai.e., Africa. and Asia together; and it was possible for the travellers of that time to cross from it to the other islands, and from the islands to the whole of the continent
Plato, Critias, section 108e (search)
Now first of all we must recall the fact that 9000 is the sum of yearsCf. Tim. 23 E. since the war occurred, as is recorded, between the dwellers beyond the pillars of Heracles and all that dwelt within themCf. Tim. 24 E.; which war we have now to relate in detail. It was stated that this city of ours was in command of the one side and fought through the whole of the war, and in command of the other side were the kings of the island of Atlantis, which we said was an island larger than Libya and Asia once upon a time, but now lies sunk by earthquakes and has created a barrier of impassable mud
Plato, Critias, section 112e (search)
So it was that these men, being themselves of the character described and always justly administering in some such fashion both their own land and Hellas, were famous throughout all Europe and Asia both for their bodily beauty and for the perfection of their moral excellence, and were of all men then living the most renowned. And now, if we have not lost recollection of what we heard when we were still children,Cf. Tim. 21 A ff. we will frankly impart to you all, as friends, our story of the men who warred against our Athenians, what their state was and how it originally came about.