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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Minor Works (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.). You can also browse the collection for Asia or search for Asia in all documents.

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Xenophon, Agesilaus (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 1 (search)
and a contingent of six thousand allies, he would cross to Asia and try to effect a peace, or, in case the barbarian wantedof entering on a struggle not to save Greece, but to subdue Asia. And what of his strategy after he had received the army anclearest impression of it. This, then, was his first act in Asia. Tissaphernes had sworn the following oath to Agesilaus: “Ido my utmost to obtain independence for the Greek cities in Asia”; and Agesilaus on his part had sworn to observe the armistmatum to Agesilaus, threatening was unless he withdrew from Asia; and the allies and the Lacedaemonians present made no concin his standard, and challenging any who claimed a right to Asia to seek a decision between themselves and the liberators bycourse to banishment or executions. Therefore the Greeks in Asia mourned his departure as though they were bidding farewell owing as they did that they must meet an enemy not inferior to themselves. This then was the end of his activities in Asia
Xenophon, Agesilaus (ed. E. C. Marchant, G. W. Bowersock, tr. Constitution of the Athenians.), chapter 2 (search)
lute-players to play. Now while they were carrying out these orders the Thebans sent a herald, asking leave to bury their dead under protection of a truce. And so a truce was made, and Agesilaus left for home, choosing, instead of supreme power in Asia, to rule and to be ruled at home according to the constitution. Some time afterwards, finding that the Argives were enjoying the fruits of their land, that they had appropriated Corinth and were finding the war a pleasant occupation, he made an exas delighted when a summons for help reached him from the Egyptian king, who actually promised him the chief command. For he believed that at one stroke he would repay the Egyptian for his good offices to Sparta, would again set free the Greeks in Asia, and would chastise the Persian for his former hostility, and for demanding now, when he professed to be an ally of Sparta, that her claim to Messene should be given up. However, when this suitor for his assistance failed to give him the command