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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 148 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 120 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 90 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 64 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 64 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 60 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 42 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 40 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 38 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 24 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Austria (Austria) or search for Austria (Austria) in all documents.

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Divine Providence for the steady progress of our army. In a little more than two years, we have recaptured nearly every important point held by the rebels on the sea-coast, and we have reconquered and now hold military possession of more than two hundred and fifty thousand square miles of territory held at one time by the rebel armies, and claimed by them as a constituent part of their Confederacy. The extent of country thus recaptured and occupied by our armies is as large as France or Austria, or the entire peninsula of Spain and Portugal, and twice as large as Great Britain, or Prussia, or Italy. Considering what we have already accomplished, the present condition of the enemy, and the immense and still unimpaired military resources of the loyal States, we may reasonably hope, with the same measure of success as heretofore, to bring this rebellion to a speedy and final termination. All of which is respectfully submitted. H. W. Halleck, General-in-Chief. Hon. E. M. Stanton,
y. It is almost impossible to lay down rules, and I invariably leave this whole subject to the local commanders, but am willing to give them the benefit of my acquired knowledge and experience. In Europe, whence we derive our principles of war, as developed by their histories, wars are between kings or rulers, through hired armies, and not between peoples. These remain, as it were, neutral, and sell their produce to whatever army is in possession. Napoleon, when at war with Prussia, Austria, and Russia, bought forage and provisions of the inhabitants, and consequently had an interest to protect farms and factories which ministered to his wants. In like manner, the allied armies in France could buy of the French inhabitants whatever they needed, the produce of the soil or manufactures of the country. Therefore, the rule was and is, that wars are confined to the armies, and should not visit the homes of families or private interests. But, in other examples, a different rule
nemy fled, hotly pursued by our regiment, and reached the Coldwater at night, where they had reinforcements and artillery posted on the opposite side. Colonel Hepburn formed line and attacked, and had quite a brisk engagement — firing only by the flashes from the enemy's guns. It being night, and the rebels with reinforcements, our troops fell back, and rested for the night. At this place Captain Horton, of company A, was wounded in the spine. He was brought to the city to-day. The rebels were armed with Austrian muskets. I saw two bullets extracted from the wounded, and they are large and effective. I omitted to state that Orderly-Sergeant Daniel Estell, of Company L, was missing at the engagement at Collierville, and not yet heard from. Colonel Hatch left Collierville, early this morning, with other forces of his command, and will pursue the enemy vigorously. The Colonel has added another laurel to his chaplet, and the Second Iowa added one more to its glorious list.