Browsing named entities in H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia.. You can also browse the collection for Denmark (Denmark) or search for Denmark (Denmark) in all documents.

Your search returned 18 results in 2 document sections:

H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 7: sea-coast defences..—Brief description of our maritime fortifications, with an Examination of the several Contests that have taken place between ships and forts, including the attack on San Juan d'ulloa, and on St. Jean d'acre (search)
und on the 30th, and attacked and defeated the Danish line on the 2d of April. The Sound between ties, when only a free passage was asked. The Danish commander replied, that he should not permit aheir coast, and passed out of the reach of the Danish batteries, which opened a fire of balls and sh season, and that, even had it been possible, Denmark would not have consented to their doing so, flaim to one half of the rich duties levied by Denmark on all ships passing the strait. There may hy vessel of the right and centre of this outer Danish line was taken or destroyed, except one or twoinquish this enterprise, and sheer off. The Danish vessels lying in the entrance of the channel weir range. The Crown-battery was behind the Danish line, and mainly masked by it. A part only of nt: Lord Nelson has directions to spare Denmark when no longer resisting; but if the firing i first favorable opportunity. 2d. That the Danish line of floating defences, consisting mostly o[5 more...]
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia., Chapter 15: military Education—Military schools of France, Prussia, Austria, Russia, England, &c.—Washington's reasons for establishing the West point Academy.—Rules of appointment and Promotion in foreign Services.—Absurdity and injustice of our own system. (search)
th about twelve thousand pupils; and numerous depot and regimental schools of practice. The smaller European powers-Belgium, Sardinia, Naples, Spain, Portugal, Denmark, Sweden, Wurtemberg, Bavaria, Baden, have each several military schools, with a large number of pupils. It is seen from these statistics, that the European powcked ten thousand Swedes and captured all their baggage and artillery; at thirty-two he gained the victory of Triebel, at forty-nine defeated the Swedes and saved Denmark, and at fifty-three defeated the Turks at the great battle of St. Gothard. In his campaigns against the French at a later age, he made it his chief merit, not thairs. He died at the age of fifty-five. Charles the XII. of Sweden ascended the throne at the age of fifteen, completed his first successful campaign against Denmark at eighteen, overthrew eighty thousand Russians at Narva before nineteen, conquered Poland and Saxony at twenty-four, and died at thirty-six. Frederick the Gre