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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 3: the Clerical appeal.—1837. (search)
k or by crook, to be at Worcester; for the meeting cannot now avoid a discussion upon the Appeal, and its decision will be looked for with great anxiety all over the land. The condemnation ought to be explicit—it ought to be strong—it ought to be decisive; especially in view of the criminal and extraordinary course pursued by the Executive Committee and Emancipator at New York. Be assured, we have too much sectarianism at headquarters. There appears to be something rotten in the state of Denmark. I am troubled exceedingly in spirit at what I am constrained to consider the blind, temporizing policy which the Board at New York seem determined to pursue. Only look at it!— Five clergymen, professing to be conspicuous abolitionists, make a public appeal, in which they bring severe and vital charges, not merely against the Liberator, but abolitionists and their course. Another appeal, backing this up, but still more grave and general in its charges, is issued at Andover, signed by thi<
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 7: the World's Convention.—1840. (search)
en to exclude the women. . . . It was said that the London meeting resolved, from the beginning, to keep out other questions — to discuss nothing but Anti-slavery. Then I turn to that Convention and tell them that, in excluding women, they did undertake to settle another great question. I say that, in that act, they swerved from their abolition integrity. If our credentials were true, there should have been an end of the matter. It was for the abolitionists of America, of France, of Denmark, of England, to choose by whom they would be represented, and not for any London committee to decide. . . . I heard . . . an apology for the London meeting, in that it had not opened its sessions with vocal prayer. It was said that, as the Convention was composed of men entertaining every variety of religious belief, it was judged best to save the feelings of those who were conscientiously opposed to formal observances, The Quakers, namely; who, in this case, may be said to have look