hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill). You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Family and circumstances. (search)
and introductory note to c. 4) - at any rate to continue his merry life at Rome, apparently without great pecuniary embarrassment. All these indications point to no financial inability or niggardliness on the part of his father. Possibly the villas, and an increase of income, came to him upon the death of his brother. 11. Whether Catullus, like Horace, was accompanied to Rome by his father is doubtful. On the whole, it seems hardly probable that he was. To say nothing of the considerations possibly connected with the interests of the elder son, the father was apparently resident in Verona at the time when Julius Caesar was governor of Gaul (Suet. Iul. 73), and this fact may indicate that at no time was the family home at Verona broken up in favor of a new one at Rome.
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Friends and foes. (search)
43), their literary pretensions (c. 105 with c. 57.7), and their licentiousness (cc. 94 and 115.7-8 with cc. 29.7-8 and 57) - These latter indications, however, but support that of c. 29.13, and would not independently establish the identity. 74. A sufficient biography of Mamurra is given by Pliny (N. H. XXXVI. 6.48), who says he was an eques of Formiae and praefectus fabrum of Caesar in Gaul, and quotes Nepos as authority for the statement that Mamurra first of the Romans incrusted the entire walls of his house on the Caelian with marble, and had within it none but solid marble columns. Cicero, too, mentions Mamurra's ill-gotten wealth (Att. VII. 7.6), and in Att.XIII. 52. 1 (written in 45 B.C.) refers to the calm way in which Caesar received news of his death (so Nipperdey interprets the allusion). The conne
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 11 (search)
sing Caesar's praises unreservedly, though he might have done so had he lived longer; but he has already yielded from his earlier position ofunmixed censure. monimenta: the places mentioned are themselves the reminders of Caesar's greatness. Gallicum: the Rhine is so styled since it was the boundary of Caesar's great conquests, and not with reference to his passage of the river from Gaul into Germany (cf. Caes. B. G. 4.16 ff.) horribile aequor: the proverbially rough English channel. ultimos: cf. Catul. 29.4 Catul. 29.12; Hor. Carm. 1.35.29 serves iturum Caesarem in ultimos orbis Britannos ; Verg. Ecl. 1.66 penitus toto divisos orbe Britannos. The preliminary invasion of Britain took place in the late summer of 5
E. T. Merrill, Commentary on Catullus (ed. E. T. Merrill), Poem 29 (search)
. ultima Britannia: cf. v.12; Catul. 11.11n. Caesar took command in Gaul in 58 B.C., and the first entry into Britain was made in the summer of 55 (cf. Caes. BG 4.20ff.). On et ille: etc. i.e. shall he come back to Italy newly enriched from the conquests in Gaul and Britain, and carry on more insolently than ever his life of debauchery? se series of prima … secunda … inde tertia; reports have just arrived of the completed conquest of Gaul and of the invasion of Britain, and the same fate now threatens them that befell former conquests, in 56 B.C., in accordance with which Pompey and Crassus were this year consuls, with the government of Spain and Syria respectively to follow, while Caesar had just had his command in Gaul extended for five years.