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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 1: discontinuance of the guide-board (search)
and in the discontinuance of such aids there is doubtless a certain risk. Some of the most powerful works of modern fiction have apparently failed to impress their moral on the careless reader. All really strong novels involving illicit love are necessarily tragedies at last, not vaudevilles; and nowhere is this more true than in French literature. The clever woman who said that nothing was worse than French immorality except French morality, simply failed to go below the surface; for in France the family feeling is so potent that the actual destruction of the domestic tie is often punished with cruel severity, even by the most tolerant novelists. The retribution in Madame Bovary, for instance, is almost too merciless, since it wreaks itself even upon the body of the poor sinner after death, and pursues her unoffending child to the poorhouse. No one has painted a climax of unlawful passion more terrific than that portrayed in the closing pages of Monsieur de Camors, the guilty pa
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 16: Anglomania and Anglophobia (search)
isely. Yet even among the class most charged with it the costliest things, the domestic architecture, the furniture, the internal decorations of houses, are almost all brought from the continent of Europe, not from England; while we go mainly to France for pictures and to Germany for science, very much as if England did not exist. In all this there is properly no element of liking or disliking, but merely the natural impulse of a newer nation to go where there are the best models, and to get tther cheek to the smiter is yet imperfectly established. When we speak of England as isolated among the nations of Europe is it possible to forget how long the arrogance of the typical Englishman has been isolating itself? Surprise is felt that France, amid the rumors of wars, should turn to Germany, which so lately humiliated her, and should turn from England, which was only an ancient foe. But to find the secrets of this hostility we must look from the publicists to the literary men, who wil
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 20: classes and masses (search)
the village of what were once farming families, but who now obtain, by trade with the city people, or work done for them, a better living than the farms ever yielded. All this is not the result of any tyranny or mortgage-grasping, but of simple purchase and transfer acceptable to all classes; there is the best of feeling, but it points to a vast and far-reaching change of tenure. Nothing apparently can sustain what is called in Europe peasant proprietorship except those iron laws which in France subdivide the inheritence of real estate into as many strips as there are children in a household — a method that would be utterly intolerable to the American mind. The upshot of it all is, that while our Constitution and general laws are secure, our social structure is still fluid and changing before our eyes, and our wisest advisers cannot yet tell us just what is to be the outcome. The impending changes imply some evil, and yet it seems altogether likely that they will at last take some