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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 25 results in 11 document sections:

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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
e, other things alike, a young man is received with more empressement than a middle-aged one. Mrs. Samuel Lawrence wrote, May 12, 1838:— I will not say with how much regret I found my Saturday evenings broken up. I think we enjoyed them so much that I trust the memory of them will induce a renewal at some future day. Then we shall have the extra pleasure of hearing your feats of valor and adventure. Your anticipations, you say, great as they were, were fully realized on landing in France. I think you peculiarly fitted to enjoy travelling. All is novelty and freshness, and with your energy, ardor, and untiring perseverance no information will be left vnattained, and no rational pleasure unsought. You have my best wishes that nothing may occur to mar this enjoyment. Dr. Palfrey wrote, Sept. 25:— You are, I will not say an enviable, but certainly a very fortunate, man; and are thus another illustration of the connection between good luck and good conduct. Gover
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
with a throb, and rejoiced as I ascended its magnificent stairway, to think that it was no fee-possession, set apart to please the eyes of royalty. One day I have passed at Versailles, to revive the recollections of that place; and I stood with melancholy interest before that exquisite conception of Joan of Arc, by poor Mary of Orleans. This sculptor-princess I once saw. She seemed pretty, intelligent, and lively; and this statue is brimful of genius and thought. In that mighty palace of France, where it now is, there is nothing more touching. One night, I listened to Mademoiselle Rachel,— the new meteor that has illuminated the French drama. Without beauty, she has intense dignity, a fine voice, and great power of conceiving the meaning of the poet. Another night, I was charmed by the wonders of the French opera, the glories of the ballet, the dance and song; another, I was an indifferent listener to Grisi, Lablache, Tamburini, and the Italian corps. And then, society has spre
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
Tuckerman's Book of Artists, pp. 247-275. I like infinitely. He is a person of remarkable character every way,—with scholarship such as few of our countrymen have; with a practical knowledge of his art, and the poetry of it; with an elevated tone of mind that shows itself equally in his views of art, and in all his conversation. I am firmly convinced that he is a superior person to any of the great artists now on the stage. I have seen something, you know, of Chantrey in England, David in France, and those English fellows at Rome. As men—as specimens of the human race to be looked up to and imitated—these are not to be mentioned in the same breath with our countryman. Three cheers for the Stripes and Stars! I have seen his Washington and studied it very carefully, and we have talked about it a great deal. It is truly great,—far beyond my expectation. The likeness is capital, and will be recognized at once; but the expression and tone of the whole are truly grand. It is in ev
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, January 4. (search)
ably arrive some time after the Easter solemnities. Perhaps you will have him there during the summer. He has been travelling, I should think, with no little profit to himself,—laboring hard to improve himself,—seeing much, and forming many acquaintances. I have promised him a friendly welcome from you. I cannot forbear saying again that I think him one of the most remarkable persons, of his age, I have ever known. He proposes to stay in Europe two or three years more; to visit Germany, France, and perhaps Spain, as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. I leave Berlin in a few days for Heidelberg, whence I shall go down the Rhine to Cologne, then to Brussels, Antwerp, London. If I can do aught for you at home, you will let me know. Can I see Sparks for you? Ah! my journey approaches its end; I shall soon be shelved in America, away from these sights which have filled me with so many throbs; down to the bottom of the well I must throw the magic rod. Tell Crawford to write m
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 21: Germany.—October, 1839, to March, 1840.—Age, 28-29. (search)
ecord of his life abroad than those which he wrote from England and France. He was so soon to be at home that he reserved the details of the poses to stay in Europe two or three years more; to visit Germany, France, and perhaps Spain, as well as England, Scotland, and Ireland. Ition of the Nemours dotation bill, the most democratic. measure in France since the Revolution of July; and yet in my conscience I think it rain is not yet free from distractions. Don Carlos is a prisoner in France. Maroto Don Rafael Maroto, a Spanish general and Carlist, 1785-e dragged out of it. The golden writers of the sixteenth century in France will be remembered ever, except in France,where they are now forgotFrance,where they are now forgotten,—Cujas, Doneau, Dumoulin, and Faber; but that vast body whose tomes weigh down the shelves of the three or four preceding centuries have p had pored for several days over the monstrosities of Bartolus. In France it several times happened to me to defend the Roman law against men
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 23: return to his profession.—1840-41.—Age, 29-30. (search)
n 1844. and others. Thomas Falconer, who visited Texas, and published a book on the Discovery of the Mississippi, wrote frequently while travelling, and while at home at Putney Hall. From Mittermaier, Foelix, and Julius, he also received tidings, —particularly from Mittermaier, who wrote in German. Fay kept him informed of society in Berlin, and of German politics. J. Randolph Clay wrote from Vienna of affairs in Eastern Europe. His brother George wrote of the public men and politics of France and other countries which he visited. Mr. Parkes wrote, in June, 1840:— I need not assure you of my friendship, and that the wide Atlantic does not sever it. All English Liberal lawyers have a fraternal feeling for you; and you know mine is further strengthened by my family connection with your country, and my own republican principles. Life spared to us, we are sure to meet again. This is the future state in which I rejoice,—the meeting of two late-discovered friends again in thi<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, July 8, 1842. (search)
apple to your heart with hooks of steel. You cannot fail to be struck by the high cultivation of all who form what is called the class of gentlemen, by their accomplished scholarship, their various acquaintance with all kinds of knowledge, their fastidious taste,—carried perhaps to excess, but erring on virtue's side. I do not know that there is much difference between the manners and social observances of the highest classes of England and those of the corresponding classes of Germany and France; but in the rank immediately below the highest,—as, among the professions, or military men, or literary men, or politicians not of the nobility,—there you will find that the Englishmen have the advantage. They are better educated and better bred, more careful in their personal habits and in social conventions,—more refined. The English country gentleman is of a class peculiar to England. He has at least three thousand pounds a year, and lives surrounded by his tenantry. Mr. Blackett, wh
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
, Prussia, and Russia, the slave-trade was declared piracy, and a mutual right of search given. France, acting under the influence of Mr. Cass and Mr. Wheaton, refused to ratify it. The slave-tradersnd. His protest and efforts have prevented thus far the ratification of the Quintuple Treaty by France, and have stimulated an angry discussion in the Chamber of Deputies, wherein much sympathy was et to go to Spain. I wish he would think of turning his face homewards. ... Longfellow sails for France the 24th April. I shall miss him very much. To Henry W. Longfellow, New York. about Malta again, visit Algiers and the north of Africa; then to Spain, and through that country into France again, —all of which, I suppose, will consume another year. I say, constantly, cui bono, all thervances of the highest classes of England and those of the corresponding classes of Germany and France; but in the rank immediately below the highest,—as, among the professions, or military men, or l
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
ge of Samuel Adams and James Bowdoin. Who, then, is the subject under the British laws? Clearly, every one— high or low, peer or peasant—born within the allegiance to the British crown: the old phrase is infra ligeantiam. The accident of birth impresses upon the infant this indelible character. The Rebellion of 1845 presented a case which put this principle to the test. I refer to the case of Macdonald (Foster's Crown Law, 59), who was born in England, but when quite young went over to France, where he was educated and passed his riper years. He joined the French forces, was taken prisoner by the English, was tried and convicted of high treason, on the ground that he was a British subject and had violated his allegiance. But the duty of allegiance carries with it the correlative duty of protection on the part of the crown. This is feudal, at the same time that it finds its support in the principles of natural justice. Who, then, is the citizen of Massachusetts? Clearly,
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
aware that, in all the threatenings of war which have lowered during the last ten years, the intervention of some friendly power, promoting peace, has actually taken place or been in contemplation. Thus, even in the extremity of our affair with France with regard to the twenty-five millions of francs, it is matter of private history that King William was prepared to intervene with his mediation in the event of an actual rupture. I cannot but think that you regard with the complacency of another age the immense military establishments and fortifications by which you are surrounded. What a boon to France, if her half million of soldiery were devoted to the building of railways and other internal improvements, instead of passing the day in carrying superfluous muskets! What a boon to Paris, if the immense sums absorbed in her fortifications were devoted to institutions of benevolence! She has more to fear from the poverty and wretchedness of her people than from any foreign foe; n
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