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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 13 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Chaplain Matthew O'Keefe of Mahone's Brigade. (search)
ous brigade of the Confederate Army; the warm personal friend of Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee, yellow fever hero and member of the Legion of Honor of France, was born in the city of Waterford, Ireland, on May 1, 1828, and in January of 1902 celebrated the golden jubilee of his ordination as a priest. For thirty-five . The watch is elaborately chased, bearing the imperial crown. On one side is engraved, in bold relief, this inscription: Presented by the Imperial Government of France to Rev. M. O'Keefe, cure of Norfolk, Va., for services rendered to the Imperial Marine, 1869. He was also enrolled as a member of the Legion of Honor of France. France. Father O'Keefe served as chaplain of Mahone's Brigade, having been appointed to the position by the Confederate Secretary in 1861. In 1887 Father O'Keefe returned to Baltimore and was appointed by Cardinal Gibbons to the chaplaincy of the Notre Dame Convent and pastor of St. Francis' Church Towson. In addition to his pastor
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The cruise of the Shenandoah. (search)
red as first lieutenant of the gunboat Chattahoochee, on the Chattahoochee River. Later he was ordered abroad to join a Confederate vessel. While awaiting her, he was selected to take dispatches from the Confederate commissioners in England and France, and Captain Bulloch, in charge of equipping cruisers, to the Richmond government. These dispatches were taken through the blockade and delivered, and he was sent back to the commissioners with return dispatches. In October, 1864, he was orded soul into his work. To his judgment, sagacity, energy and tact, was due the possession and fitting out of the Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Rappahannock, Stonewall, Shenandoah, and the building of the ironclad rams at Liverpool and the vessels in France. Such of these vessels as took the sea, took it not as privateers, as they were called by some; not as pirates, as our enemies opprobriously spoke of us, but as armed government vessels of war, commanded and officered by men born in the South
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
Quartermaster—Captain Buford Allen Tracy. Commissary of Subsistance—Captain R. Williams. Chaplain—Rev. William L. Riddle. Sergeants-Major—John Henry Jackson, James Royall Price. Colonel Chenault. David Waller Chenault was born in Madison County, Ky., February 5, 1826, the son of Anderson Chenault and Emily Cameron, his wife. Through his father he was descended from Estenne Chenault, a native of Languedoc, France, who, in company with many other Huguenots, was obliged to leave France after the revocation of the edict of Nantes, and in 1700 settled in Virginia. Colonel Chenault's grandfather, William Chenault, a soldier of the Revolutionary War, was among the first settlers of Kentucky and lived and died on a farm near Richmond that he bought in 1878, from George Boone, a brother of Daniel Boone. Through his brother, Colonel Chenault was descended from Robert Cameron, of Inverness, Scotland, who fought under his chieftain, Cameron of Lochiel, at the battle of Culloden,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.65 (search)
Marcus J. Wright: My Dear General,—I enclose the narrative of my journey to France in 1865, intended to refute the suggestions of the Washington Post, and beg thaome acquaintance with him. I had met him privately several times before leaving France. I had introduced to him one of the delegates whom, at an early stage of the cuth, and in fact, it is difficult for me even now to comprehend how England and France could, from the first, submit to a mere paper blockade, in direct opposition to he would avail himself of this opportunity to write a letter to the Emperor of France, of which his aide-de-camp, Colonel Ernest Miltenberger, should be the bearer. as that suggested by the Washington Post—viz., the retrocession of Louisiana to France in return for armed intervention, nor does he assert it verbatim. Governor Aadding that the ties of blood had ever since kept alive a natural sympathy with France among the descendants of the first settlers. The Emperor granted my request, b
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
to be Freed and made Soldiers, 181 New Market Battle of 155 Cadets killed at, 231 O'Keefe; Chaplain Matthew, 176 Yellow Fever Hero 177 Defied Gen. Butler 182 Olds, F. A., 322 Parham Ensign J. T.. 348 Parker's Battery Capt. W. W., 103 Gen. S. 1). Lee's regard for 103 Pegram Gen. W. R. J., 57 Payne, J. U.; His sacrifices for the Southern Cause, 127 Payne, Gen., Wm. H., 134 Petersburg. Defence of, in June, 1864, 1 Tablet to the Killed, 12 Polignac C. J.; His Mission to France in 1865 326 Prison Pens at Point Lookout 19 Quisenberry, Adam Chenault, 259 Ramsay, C. S. Navy, Lieut. J. F.. 242 Ridley, Capt. killed, 43 Rives, Timothy, captured, 14; battle on his farm 9 Roberts Rear Admiral E C. 174 Secession, The Right of, 166 Sharpsburg Battle of 142, 196; mortality of 22nd Virginia at, 348 Shenandoah, C. S. Steamer, 235; officers of, 242; vessels captured by, 245; the flag of, 258. Sherman's, Gen. W. T. War is hell 365 Shiloh, The Battle