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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2,462 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 692 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 516 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 418 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Gallic War 358 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 4, 15th edition. 298 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 230 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 190 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 182 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for France (France) or search for France (France) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], A remarkable Phenomenon...a Chapter of similar ones. (search)
.--On the 14th inst the same scene, almost identical, was seen by eight or ten of our pickets at Bunger's Mill, and by many of the citizens in that neighborhood, this is about four miles cast of Pearcy's. It was about one hour passing. a writer in the Spectator argues that the phenomenon described above was a mirage, and gives the following similar instances. 1st. On July 26th, 1797, about 5 P. M., at Hastings, on the south coast of England, a large portion of the coast of France appeared to a number of observers so distinctly, that sailors, who were spectators of the scene, pointed out to the narrator and witness of the phenomenon a number of places easily recognized with the naked eye, but further increased in distinctness by the use of the telescope. Places known as the Bay, the Old Head, and Dover Cliffs, even the French fishing boats, and portions of the French coast at a distance from 80 to 90 miles, all appearing as near as if they were sailing at a small dis
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], An attempt to discover a murderer by photography. (search)
vansville (Ind.) Journal gives the following account of an attempt to discover a murderer by photography: A few days since Mr. Adams, a photographies of this city, at the solicitation of some gentlemen who had read of similar experiments in France, took his instrument and visited the scene of the late murder in German township. This was some thirty hours after the murdered man had breathed his last. There was a great deal of dust flying and a great crowd collected, which materially interich has attended his efforts, as it seems to us he has demonstrated that an object was pictured upon the eye of Mr. Herke at the time of his death, and that the object was a human face. Similar experiments, we are informed, have been made in France with great success, and mysterious murders unravelled through the instrumentality of Daguerre's wonderful art. Notwithstanding we had heard of these strange things, we were still under the impression that "dead men tell no tales." until a recent
The Daily Dispatch: October 2, 1863., [Electronic resource], An attempt to discover a murderer by photography. (search)
Signs of flagging, --All the Yankee papers which we receive are filled with braggadocio — speaking, always, of the crushing out of the rebellion, as though it were already an accomplished fact, and constantly threatening France, England, and Spain, with the vengeance of the all-powerful Yankee nation. If we look a little below the surface, however, it is not difficult to discover that this is all talk and nothing else, designed to delude the multitude and encourage them to persevere in the prosecution of this war. The signs of exhaustion are so palpable that they cannot be mistaken by the least experienced eye. In the first place, the New York World tells us, what we had previously heard from a source entitled to credit, that the draft has proved a complete failure, not having secured the services of 60,000 men, all told, throughout the whole Yankee States. Now these 60,000 men will go but a very short way to fill up the gap made in the Yankee ranks by the campaign of 1863