hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 290 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 244 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 174 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 134 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 64 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 62 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 58 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 407 (search)
Epops Are you calling me? What do you want of me? Leader of the Chorus Who are they? From what country? Epops Strangers, who have come from Greece, the land of the wise. Leader of the Chorus And what fate has led them hither to the land of the birds? Epops Their love for you and their wish to share your kind of life; to dwell and remain with you always. Leader of the Chorus Indeed, and what are their plans? Epops They are wonderful, incredible, unheard of. Leader of the Chorus Why, do they think to see some advantage that determines them to settle here? Are they hoping with our help to triumph over their foes or to be useful to their friends? Epops They speak of benefits so great it is impossible either to describe or conceive them; all shall be yours, all that we see here, there, above and below us; this they vouch for. Leader of the Chorus Are they mad? Epops They are the sanest people in the world. Leader of the Chorus Clever men? Epops The slyest of foxes, cleverness
Aristophanes, Birds (ed. Eugene O'Neill, Jr.), line 989 (search)
etch that I am. He departs. Pisthetaerus Away with you, and take your prophecies elsewhere. Enter Meton, with surveying instruments. Meton I have come to you . . . Pisthetaerus Interrupting. Yet another pest! What have you come to do? What's your plan? What's the purpose of your journey? Why these splendid buskins? Meton I want to survey the plains of the air for you and to parcel them into lots. Pisthetaerus In the name of the gods, who are you? Meton Who am I? Meton, known throughout Greece and at Colonus. Pisthetaerus What are these things? Meton Tools for measuring the air. In truth, the spaces in the air have precisely the form of a furnace. With this bent ruler I draw a line from top to bottom; from one of its points I describe a circle with the compass. Do you understand? Pisthetaerus Not in the least. Meton With the straight ruler I set to work to inscribe a square within this circle; in its center will be the market-place, into which all the straight streets will lea