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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
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Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 64 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

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Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1 (search)
Agamemnon Leda, the daughter of Thestius, had three children, maidens, Phoebe, Clytemnestra my wife, and Helen; the foremost of the favored sons of Hellas came to woo Helen; but terrible threats of spilling his rival's blood were uttered by each of them, if he should fail to win the girl. Now the matter filled Tyndareus, her father, with perplexity, whether to give her or not, how he might best succeed. This thought occurred to him: the suitors should swear to each other and join right handsher. Her choice fell on Menelaus; would she had never taken him! Then there came to Lacedaemon from the Phrygians the man who, Argive legend says, judged the goddesses' dispute; in robes of gorgeous hue, ablaze with gold, in true barbaric pomp; and he, finding Menelaus gone from home, carried Helen off, in mutual desire, to his steading on Ida. Goaded to frenzy, Menelaus flew through Hellas, invoking the ancient oath exacted by Tyndareus and declaring the duty of helping the injured husband.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 265 (search)
Chorus And from Mycenae, the Cyclopes' town, Atreus' son sent a hundred well-manned galleys, and Adrastos was with him in command, as friend with friend, that Hellas might exact vengeance on the one who had fled her home to wed a foreigner. Also I saw upon Gerenian Nestor's prows from Pylos the ensign of his neighbour Alpheus, four-footed like a bull.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 303 (search)
Old man as Menelaus wrests a letter from him.Strange daring yours, Menelaus, where you have no right. Menelaus Stand back! You carry loyalty to your master too far. Old man The very reproach you have for me is to my credit. Menelaus You shall rue it, if you meddle in matters that do not concern you. Old man You had no right to open a letter, which I was carrying. Menelaus No, nor you to be carrying sorrow to all Hellas. Old man Argue that point with others, but surrender that letter to me. Menelaus I shall not let go. Old man Nor will I let loose my hold. Menelaus Why then, this staff of mine will be dabbling your head with blood before long. Old man To die in my master's cause would be a noble death. Menelaus Let go! you are too wordy for a slave. Old man seeing Agamemnon approachingMaster, he is wronging me; he snatched your letter violently from my grasp, Agamemnon, and will not heed the claims of right.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 349 (search)
This was the first cause I had to reprove you, for it was here I first discovered your villainy; but afterwards, when you came to Aulis with all the gathered hosts of Hellas, you were of no account; no! the want of a favorable breeze filled you with consternation at the chance dealt out by the gods. Then the Danaids began demanding that you should send the fleet away instead of vainly toiling on at Aulis; what dismay and confusion was then depicted in your looks, to think that you, with a thoule in power, and then retire dishonorably, sometimes owing to the senselessness of the citizens, sometimes deservedly, because they are too feeble of themselves to maintain their watch upon the state. For my part, I am more sorry for our unhappy Hellas, whose purpose was to read these worthless foreigners a lesson, while now she will let them escape and mock her, thanks to you and your daughter. May I never appoint a man to rule my country or lead its warriors because of his courage! Sense is w
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 402 (search)
should sympathize with friends in sorrow. Agamemnon Claim my help by kindly service, not by paining me. Menelaus So you have no mind to share this trouble with Hellas? Agamemnon No, Hellas is diseased like you, according to some god's design. Menelaus Go boast of your scepter, after betraying your own brother! while I will sHellas is diseased like you, according to some god's design. Menelaus Go boast of your scepter, after betraying your own brother! while I will seek some different means and other friends. Messenger entering hurriedly.Agamemnon, lord of Hellas! I have come and bring you your daughter, whom you call Iphigenia in your home; and her mother, your wife Clytemnestra, is with her, and the child Orestes, a sight to gladden you after your long absence from your home; but they haHellas! I have come and bring you your daughter, whom you call Iphigenia in your home; and her mother, your wife Clytemnestra, is with her, and the child Orestes, a sight to gladden you after your long absence from your home; but they had been travelling long and far, they are now resting their tender feet at the waters of a fair spring, they and their horses, for we turned these loose in the grassy meadow to browse their fill. But I have come as their forerunner to prepare you for their reception; for the army knows already of your daughter's arrival, so quickl
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 573 (search)
reared to herd the cows among the white heifers of Ida, piping in foreign strain and breathing on your reeds an echo of the Phrygian airs Olympus played. Full-uddered cows were browsing at the spot where that verdict between goddesses was awaiting you—the cause of your going to Hellas to stand before the ivory palace, kindling love in Helen's entranced eyes and feeling its flutter in your own breast; from which the fiend of strife brought Hellas with her spear and ships to the towers of Troy.reared to herd the cows among the white heifers of Ida, piping in foreign strain and breathing on your reeds an echo of the Phrygian airs Olympus played. Full-uddered cows were browsing at the spot where that verdict between goddesses was awaiting you—the cause of your going to Hellas to stand before the ivory palace, kindling love in Helen's entranced eyes and feeling its flutter in your own breast; from which the fiend of strife brought Hellas with her spear and ships to the towers of T
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 677 (search)
ed his father's halls? Agamemnon Peleus, who wedded the daughter of Nereus. Clytemnestra With the god's consent, or when he had taken her in spite of gods? Agamemnon Zeus betrothed her, and her guardian gave consent. Clytemnestra Where did he marry her? in the billows of the sea? Agamemnon In Chiron's home, at sacred Pelion's foot. Clytemnestra What! the abode ascribed to the race of Centaurs? Agamemnon It was there the gods celebrated the marriage feast of Peleus. Clytemnestra Did Thetis or his father train Achilles? Agamemnon Chiron brought him up, to prevent his learning the ways of the wicked. Clytemnestra Ah! wise the teacher, still wiser the one who gave his son. Agamemnon Such is the future husband of your daughter. Clytemnestra A blameless lord; but what city in Hellas is his? Agamemnon He dwells on the banks of the river Apidanus, in the borders of Phthia. Clytemnestra Will you convey our daughter there? Agamemnon He who takes her to himself will see to that.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 716 (search)
ding torch. Clytemnestra That is not the custom; but you think lightly of these things. Agamemnon It is not good for you to be alone among a soldier-crowd. Clytemnestra It is good that a mother should give her own child away. Agamemnon Yes, and that those maidens at home should not be left alone. Clytemnestra They are well guarded in their maiden bowers. Agamemnon Obey. Clytemnestra No, by the goddess-queen of Argos! Go, manage matters out of doors; but in the house it is my place to decide [what is proper for maidens at their wedding]. Agamemnon Woe is me! my efforts are baffled; I am disappointed in my hope, anxious as I was to get my wife out of sight; foiled at every point, I form my plots and subtle schemes against my best-beloved. But I will go, in spite of all, with Calchas the priest, to inquire the goddess's good pleasure, fraught with ill-luck as it is to me, and with trouble to Hellas. He who is wise should keep in his house a good and useful wife or none at all.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 762 (search)
Chorus And on the towers of Troy and round her walls shall Trojans stand, when sea-borne troops with brazen shields row in on shapely ships to the channels of the Simois, eager to take Helen, the sister of that heavenly pair whom Zeus begot, from Priam, and bear her back to Hellas by toil of Achaean shields and spears.
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 944 (search)
ustral water. Why, what is a seer? A man who with luck tells the truth sometimes, with frequent falsehoods, but when his luck deserts him, collapses then and there. It is not to secure a bride that I have spoken thus—there are maids unnumbered eager to have my love—no! but king Agamemnon has put an insult on me; he should have asked my leave to use my name as a means to catch the child, for it was I chiefly who induced Clytemnestra to betroth her daughter to me; I would had yielded this to Hellas, if that was where our going to Ilium broke down; I would never have refused to further my fellow soldiers' common interest. But as it is, I am as nothing in the eyes of those chieftains, and little they care of treating me well or ill. My sword shall soon know if any one is to snatch your daughter from me, for then will I make it reek with the bloody stains of slaughter, before it reach Phrygia. Calm yourself then; as a god in his might I appeared to you, without being so, but such will I
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