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Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 464 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 290 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 244 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 174 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 134 0 Browse Search
Xenophon, Anabasis (ed. Carleton L. Brownson) 106 0 Browse Search
Euripides, Iphigenia in Aulis (ed. E. P. Coleridge) 74 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 64 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 62 0 Browse Search
Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 58 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge). You can also browse the collection for Greece (Greece) or search for Greece (Greece) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 16 document sections:

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Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1393 (search)
Chorus Leader Tell us clearly each event within the house. [for till now I have been guessing at what I do not clearly understand.] Phrygian Ah, for Linus! Ah, for Linus! That is what barbarians say, alas, in their eastern tongue as a prelude to death, whenever royal blood is spilled upon the ground by deadly iron blades. To tell you everything in turn, they came into the house, two twin lions of Hellas; one was called the general's son; the other was the son of Strophius, a crafty plotter, like Odysseus, treacherous in silence, but true to his friends, bold for the fight, clever in war and a deadly serpent. Curse him for his quiet plotting, the villain! In they came to the throne of the wife of Paris the archer, faces wet with tears, and took their seats in all humility, one on this side, one on that, each with weapons. They threw, they threw their suppliant arms round the knees of Helen. Her Phrygian servants sprang up frantic, frantic; they called to each other in terror th
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1353 (search)
e a din, a din and shouting before the house, that the murder when done may not inspire the Argives with wild alarm, to make them bring aid to the palace, before I see for certain that Helen's corpse lies bloody in the house, or hear the news from one of her attendants; for I know a part of the tragedy, of the rest I am not sure. In justice, retribution from the gods has come to Helen; for she filled all Hellas with tears, through that accursed, accursed Paris of Ida, who drew Hellas to Troy.e a din, a din and shouting before the house, that the murder when done may not inspire the Argives with wild alarm, to make them bring aid to the palace, before I see for certain that Helen's corpse lies bloody in the house, or hear the news from one of her attendants; for I know a part of the tragedy, of the rest I am not sure. In justice, retribution from the gods has come to Helen; for she filled all Hellas with tears, through that accursed, accursed Paris of Ida, who drew Hellas to Troy.
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1302 (search)
Electra sung Slay her, kill her, destroy her! Stab with your twin double-edged swords the woman who left her father, left her husband, and killed so many of the men of Hellas, slain beside the river-bank, where tears rained down, by the iron darts all round the eddies of Scamander.
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1155 (search)
gainst Aegisthus, and stood by me in danger, and now again you are offering me a means to punish my foes and do not stand aside—but I will cease praising you, for there is something wearisome even in being praised to excess. Now since in any case I must breathe my last, I want to do something to my enemies before my death, so that I may requite with ruin those who betrayed me, and so that those who made me suffer may grieve. Yes! I am the son of Agamemnon, who was considered worthy to rule Hellas, no tyrant but yet god-like in power; I will not disgrace him by submitting to die like a slave; my last breath shall be free and I will take vengeance on Menelaus. For if we could secure one object, we would be lucky, if a means of safety should unexpectedly come our way from somewhere, and we should be the slayers, not the slain; this is what I pray for. This wish of mine is a pleasant dream to cheer the heart, without cost, by means of the mouth's winged words. Electra I think I have i
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 1105 (search)
w? She has her barbarian attendants. Pylades Barbarians indeed! I am not the man to fear any Phrygian. Orestes They are only fit to look after mirrors and perfumes! Pylades Has she brought Trojan luxury with her here? Orestes So much so, that Hellas is too small for her to live in. Pylades The race of slaves is nothing to those who are free. Orestes Well, if I can do this deed, I do not shrink from dying twice over. Pylades No, nor I either, if it is you I am avenging. Orestes Explain tretes To kill Helen; I understand that watchword. Pylades You have it; now hear how sound my scheme is. If we drew the sword upon a woman of greater chastity, the murder would be infamous; but, as it is, she will be punished for the sake of all Hellas, whose fathers she slew, whose children she destroyed, and made widows out of brides. There will be shouts of joy, and they will kindle the altars of the gods, invoking on our heads many blessings, because we shed a wicked woman's blood. After
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 960 (search)
Electra O Pelasgia, I take up the dirge, doing bloody outrage on my cheeks with white nail, and beating on my head; these are the portion of Persephone, fair young goddess of the nether world. Let the Cyclopian land break forth into wailing for the sorrows of our house, laying the steel upon the head to crop it close. This is the piteous, piteous strain that goes up for those who are about to die, once the battle-leaders of Hellas.
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 807 (search)
Chorus The great prosperity and the prowess, proudly boasted throughout Hellas and by the streams of Simois, went back again from good fortune for the Atreidae long ago, from an old misfortune to their house, when strife came to the sons of Tantalus over a golden ram, to end in most pitiable banqueting and the slaughter of high-born children; and this is why murder exchanges for murder, through blood, and does not leave the two Atreidae.
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 640 (search)
have that; do not kill Hermione. For in my present plight, you must have an advantage over me and I must pardon it. But give to my miserable father my life and the life of my sister, a maiden so long; for by my death I shall leave my father's house without an heir. You will say it is impossible. That's the point; friends are bound to help friends in trouble. But when fortune gives of its best, what need of friends? For the god's help is enough of itself when he is willing to give it. All Hellas believes that you love your wife, and I am not saying this to flatter or wheedle you; by her I implore you. Ah me, my misery! to what have I come! Well? I must suffer, for I am making this appeal on behalf of my whole family. O my uncle, my father's own brother! Imagine that the dead man in his grave is listening, that his spirit is hovering over you and saying what I say, this much for tears and groans and misfortunes. I have spoken and I have begged for my safety, hunting what all seek,
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 544 (search)
cret husband in the home; I killed him, and I sacrificed my mother, an unholy crime, no doubt, but done to avenge my father. Now, as regards the reasons for which I deserve to be stoned as you threatened, hear the service I am conferring on all Hellas. For if women become so bold as to murder their husbands, taking refuge in their children, hunting down pity with the breast, they would think nothing of destroying their husbands on any charge whatsoever. But I, by a horrible crime, as you boast it to be, have put an end to this custom. I hated my mother and killed her justly. She was false to her husband when he was gone from his home to fight for all Hellas at the head of its armies, and she did not keep his bed undefiled; and when her sin had found her out, she did not impose punishment on herself, but, to avoid paying the penalty to her husband, punished my father by death. By the gods! it is not a good time for me to mention the gods, when defending the charge of murder; but if
Euripides, Orestes (ed. E. P. Coleridge), line 470 (search)
s This is his son, this creature here? Menelaus Yes, his son; if he is in misfortune, he ought to be honored. Tyndareus You have been so long among barbarians that you have become one of them. Menelaus Always to honor one's kin is a custom in Hellas. Tyndareus And another custom is to yield a willing deference to the laws. Menelaus The wise hold that everything which depends on necessity is a slave. Tyndareus Keep that wisdom for yourself; I will not have it. Menelaus Yes, for you are aot wise. Tyndareus What does a dispute about foolishness have to do with him? If right and wrong are clear to all, who was ever more senseless than this man, because he never weighed the justice of the case, nor appealed to the universal law of Hellas? For when Agamemnon breathed his last [struck on his head by my daughter] a most foul deed, which I will never defend, he should have brought a charge against his mother and inflicted a holy penalty for bloodshed, banishing her from his house; t
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