hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Polybius, Histories 310 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 138 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 134 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, The fourteen orations against Marcus Antonius (Philippics) (ed. C. D. Yonge) 102 0 Browse Search
John Conington, Commentary on Vergil's Aeneid, Volume 2 92 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 90 0 Browse Search
C. Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Civil War (ed. William Duncan) 86 0 Browse Search
Cornelius Tacitus, The History (ed. Alfred John Church, William Jackson Brodribb) 70 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. John Dryden) 68 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 66 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer). You can also browse the collection for Italy (Italy) or search for Italy (Italy) in all documents.

Your search returned 20 results in 5 document sections:

Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 2 (search)
ar that Apollodorus passes so lightly over the exploits of Herakles in Italy, and in particular that he says nothing about those adventures of his vid, Fasti i.543ff. On the popularity of the worship of Herakles in Italy, see Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiq. Rom. i.40.6, who says: “And in many other parts of Italy (besides Rome) precincts are consecrated to the god, and altars are set up both in cities and beside roads; and hardly will you find a place in Italy where the god is not honoured.” and hastily plunging into the sea swam across to Sicily, and having passed through the neighboring country since called Italy after it, for the Tyrrhenians called the bull italus,Some of the ancients supposed that the name of Italy was derivedItaly was derived from the Latin vitulus, “a calf.” See Varro, Re. Rust. ii.1.9; Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiq. Rom. i.35.2; compare Aulus Gellius
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
erum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. p. 118 (Second Vatican Mythographer 128). The silence of Apollodorus as to this well-known Italian legend, which was told to account for the famous priesthood of Diana at Aricia, like his complete silence as to Rome, which he never mentions, tends to show that Apollodorus either deliberately ignored the Roman empire or wrote at a time when there was but little intercourse between Greece and that part of Italy which was under Roman rule. as the author of the Naupactica reports; Tyndareus, as Panyasis says;For the raising of Tyndareus from the dead by Aesculapius see also Sextus Empiricus, p. 658, ed. Bekker; Scholiast on Eur. Alc. 1 (both these writers cite Panyasis as their authority); Lucian, De saltatione 45; Zenobius, Cent. i.47; Pliny, Nat. Hist. xxix.3. Hymenaeus, as the Orphics report; and Glaucus, son of Minos,See above, Apollod. 3.3.1
Apollodorus, Library (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book 3 (search)
capture by the Greeks ensured the fall of Troy. The Roman tradition was that the image remained in Troy till the city was taken by the Greeks, when Aeneas succeeded in rescuing it and conveying it away with him to Italy, where it was finally deposited in the temple of Vesta at Rome. These two traditions are clearly inconsistent with each other, and the Roman tradition further conflicts with the belief that the city which possessed the sacey affirmed that the thief Diomedes had been constrained to restore the stolen image to its proper owners (First Vatican Mythographer 40, 142); or that, warned by Athena in a dream, he afterwards made it over to Aeneas in Italy (Silius Italicus, Punic. xiii.30ff.). But the Romans were not the only people who claimed to possess the true Palladium; the Argives maintained that it was with them (Paus. 2.23.5), and the Athenians asserted
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
rious countries, some in Libya, some in Italy, others in Sicily, and some in the islaessaly. Philoctetes went to the Campanians in Italy; Phidippus with the Coans settled in Andros, Ahiloctetes was driven to Campania in Italy, and after making war on the Lucania Il. 2.717ff.), and fled to southern Italy, where he founded the cities of Petilia, Old C that Philoctetes engaged after his arrival in Italy. Tzetzes, Scholia on Lycophro Navaethus is a river of Italy.This paragraph is quoted from Tzetzes, Scholia, finding themselves in that part of Italy, and dreading slavery in Greece, set Podalirius was worshipped as a hero in Italy. He had a shrine at the foot of Mount e Lycophron said that Podalirius was buried in Italy, and for so saying he was severely taken to tae, hidden in a bundle of faggots, to Aricia in Italy. See Servius on Virgil, ii.116, vi.136; Script
Apollodorus, Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer), book E (search)
's account, the kinsmen of the slain suitors rose in revolt against Ulysses; but Neoptolemus, being invited by both parties to act as arbitrator, sentenced Ulysses to banishment for bloodshed, and condemned the friends and relatives of the suitors to pay an annual compensation to Ulysses for the damage they had done to his property. The sentence obliged Ulysses to withdraw not only from Ithaca, but also from Cephallenia and Zacynthus; and he retired to Italy. The compensation exacted from the heirs of the suitors was paid in kind, and consisted of barley groats, wine, honey, olive oil, and animal victims of mature age. This payment Ulysses ordered to be made to his son Telemachus. and that Ulysses went to Aetolia, to Thoas, son of Andraemon, married the daughter of Thoas, and leaving a son Leontophonus, whom he had by her,These last recorded doings of Ulysses appear to be mentioned by no other ancient