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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 272 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 186 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 40 0 Browse Search
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 36 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the Colonization of the United States, Vol. 1, 17th edition. 32 0 Browse Search
Raphael Semmes, Memoirs of Service Afloat During the War Between the States 28 0 Browse Search
Baron de Jomini, Summary of the Art of War, or a New Analytical Compend of the Principle Combinations of Strategy, of Grand Tactics and of Military Policy. (ed. Major O. F. Winship , Assistant Adjutant General , U. S. A., Lieut. E. E. McLean , 1st Infantry, U. S. A.) 24 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 10 18 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 3, 15th edition. 16 0 Browse Search
H. Wager Halleck , A. M. , Lieut. of Engineers, U. S. Army ., Elements of Military Art and Science; or, Course of Instruction in Strategy, Fortification, Tactis of Battles &c., Embracing the Duties of Staff, Infantry, Cavalry, Artillery and Engineers. Adapted to the Use of Volunteers and Militia. 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 8. You can also browse the collection for Portugal (Portugal) or search for Portugal (Portugal) in all documents.

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ts four major generals. Of these, the first, from deference to Massachusetts, was Artemas Ward. Notwithstanding his ill health, he answered: I always have been, and am still ready to devote my life in attempting to deliver my native country. The American people with ingenuous confidence assumed that Charles Lee,—the son of an English officer, trained up from boyhood for the army,—was, as he represented himself, well versed in the science of war, familiar with active service in America, Portugal, Poland, and Turkey, and altogether a soldier of consummate ability, who had joined their cause from the purest impulses of a generous nature. In England he was better understood. From what I know of him, wrote Sir Joseph Yorke, then British minister at the Hague, he is the worst present which could be made to any army. He left the standard of his king, because he saw no Chap. XLI.} 1775. June 17. chance of being provided for at home, and, as an adventurer, sought employment in any par
uniform will of Washington was steadily exerted, with a quiet, noiseless, and irresistible energy. There are many things amiss in this camp, said the chaplain Emerson; yet, upon the whole, Chap. XLII.} 1775. July. God is in the midst of us. Meantime Lee had not been many days in the camp before the British generals in Boston, who knew him well, showed a disposition to tamper with him for their own purposes. From Philadelphia he had, in June, addressed to Burgoyne, his old comrade in Portugal, a public letter condemning American taxation by parliament, and tracing the malady of the state to the corrupt influence of the crown. In an able reply, Burgoyne insisted, for himself and for Howe, that their political principles were unchanged, and invited Lee to an interview within the British lines, for the purpose of inducing such explanations as might tend in their consequences to peace, for, said he, as if with the highest authority, I know Great Britain is ready to open her arms up