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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 30: addresses before colleges and lyceums.—active interest in reforms.—friendships.—personal life.—1845-1850. (search)
and Longfellow. Death and change of interests eliminated front time to time from the list several between whom and himself many letters had passed. One from Mr. Daveis, of Portland, in 1847, broke a long interval, urging Sumner to attend that year the dinner of the Society of the Cincinnati in Boston, with whom he had last met in 1844. It is perhaps worthy of note that Alexander H. Everett, 1792-1847. as appears by a letter to Sumner just before leaving the country for his mission to China, where he died a year later, named Sumner without his knowledge to Mr. Buchanan, then Secretary of State, for the post of chief clerk in his department, which it was expected would soon be made that of assistant secretary of State. The circumstance shows Mr. Everett's appreciation of Sumner's character and attainments. Sumner had friendly relations with Henry C. Carey, 1793-1879. of Philadelphia, and in 1847 read the proofs of the latter's book, entitled The Past, the Present, and th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, chapter 14 (search)
liquid about the brain, and in a slight degree of congestion,—chiefly, if not wholly, confined to the membrane around the brain, but taking effect by counter-stroke in the spine. To Sumner's instant inquiry as to the remedy, the doctor replied fire; and the patient asking for an immediate application, the moxa was applied that afternoon to the back of the neck and to the spine. The moxa is a mode of cauterization known to the ancients, but in modern times is chiefly confined to Japan and China, where it is freely applied. It is now rejected as a remedy in civilized countries, and is barely mentioned in the medical literature of the present day, milder applications being found equally effective. Larousse's Dictionnaire Universel, vol. XI.; Holmes and Hulkes's System of Surgery, vol. i. p. 946; vol. III. pp. 640-642. Dr. Hayward at the time recommended Vienna paste instead of the moxa. He had advised against consulting Velpeau, for the reason that he would apply a hot iron to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 43: return to the Senate.—the barbarism of slavery.—Popular welcomes.—Lincoln's election.—1859-1860. (search)
on,—Burlingame and Alexander H. Rice, the former of whom, however, failed of an election. Mr. Burlingame's defeat, which Sumner deeply regretted (Works, vol. v. pp. 348, 349), led to a new career,—his appointment by Mr. Lincoln as Minister to China, and his subsequent diplomatic service for the Chinese Empire, in which he died, Feb. 23, 1870, at St. Petersburg, at the age of forty-nine. On all these occasions he was received with every mark of popular affection and confidence. Sumner's aChinese Empire, in which he died, Feb. 23, 1870, at St. Petersburg, at the age of forty-nine. On all these occasions he was received with every mark of popular affection and confidence. Sumner's activity in the canvass of 1860 was confined to Massachusetts, and he withstood solicitations to speak elsewhere. Letters declining to speak at meetings are found in Works, vol. v. pp. 190, 230, 231, 234, 269, 271. His thoughts were fully before the public in his speech in the Senate and his address at Cooper Institute; and, as already indicated, he had come to value far more the effect of an argument on the public mind as widely distributed in the public journals than as delivered from the p