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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 19: (search)
o was the evening. I had asked Mildmay to invite nobody to meet me, and so we had a quiet and most agreeable time in the library. . . . . August 5.—We had a little rain this forenoon, which was much wanted in the country, and very welcome to me, as it prevented all suggestion of moving. I remained in my chamber, chiefly occupied with writing. In the afternoon it was fine again, and we drove to Knowle, a grand old castellated mansion, belonging to the widow of the late Lord Amherst, of Chinese memory. Parts of it date from the time of King John, and none is more recent than the time of Henry VIII. It is very extensive, few old castles being so large, and it has an awful, hard, grim, feudal look, so slight have been the changes made in it . . . . . The drive was fine. Its own park is very large, and we took another in our way back. August 6.—. . . . The day has been cool and beautiful. I lounged in the library an hour or so after breakfast, and then wrote and read in great
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 20: (search)
t they do not like to have us growing very strong, lest we should claim a high place among the nations, and make trouble in the world. Multitudes among them cry out very honestly against our slavery, and take part with the North, to help put it down by force of the world's opinion. But, when once we are separated, they will make the best treaties they can for their own interests with both parties. In doing this, philanthropy will have as little to do with their diplomacy as it has had in China. Their manufactures will be admitted free at the South, and they will receive free the great staples they need in return;but we at the North cannot make such treaties with them; and though we may possibly, but not probably, get Canada and Nova Scotia, about which they will care little, we can, if separated, never have profitable or really satisfactory relations with these provinces, or with the mother country. The same is the case, though in an inferior degree, with France and the other go