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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 84 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 54 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Adelphi: The Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, The Odyssey (ed. Samuel Butler, Based on public domain edition, revised by Timothy Power and Gregory Nagy.) 10 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.). You can also browse the collection for Cyprus (Cyprus) or search for Cyprus (Cyprus) in all documents.

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Flavius Josephus, Antiquities of the Jews (ed. William Whiston, A.M.), Book 1, section 122 (search)
s to the Tharsians, for so was Cilicia of old called; the sign of which is this, that the noblest city they have, and a metropolis also, is Tarsus, the tau being by change put for the theta. Cethimus possessed the island Cethima: it is now called Cyprus; and from that it is that all islands, and the greatest part of the sea-coasts, are named Cethim by the Hebrews: and one city there is in Cyprus that has been able to preserve its denomination; it has been called Citius by those who use the languCyprus that has been able to preserve its denomination; it has been called Citius by those who use the language of the Greeks, and has not, by the use of that dialect, escaped the name of Cethim. And so many nations have the children and grandchildren of Japhet possessed. Now when I have premised somewhat, which perhaps the Greeks do not know, I will return and explain what I have omitted; for such names are pronounced here after the manner of the Greeks, to please my readers; for our own country language does not so pronounce them: but the names in all cases are of one and the same ending; for the na