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Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 84 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 54 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Adelphi: The Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 10 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Lycurgus, Speeches. You can also browse the collection for Cyprus (Cyprus) or search for Cyprus (Cyprus) in all documents.

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Lycurgus, Against Leocrates, section 73 (search)
And to crown their victory: not content with erecting the trophy in Salamis, they fixed for the Persian the boundaries necessary for Greek freedom and prevented his overstepping them, making an agreement that he should not sail his warships between the Cyaneae and Phaselis and that the Greeks should be free not only if they lived in Europe but in Asia too.Lycurgus seems to be referring in exaggerated terms to the campaign in which the Athenians won a naval victory off Cyprus (qv. Thuc. 1.112). That he connects it with the battle of the Eurymedon which took place some eighteen years earlier (c. 467 B.C.) need not surprise us, in view of his other inaccuracies (cf. Lyc. 1.62 and Lyc. 1.70). The agreement in question is the so-called Peace of Callias (c. 448 B.C.), about which nothing certain is known. His account of the sea limit agrees substantially with that of other orators (e.g. Isoc. 12.59; Dem. 19.273), but the old triumphs over Persia were exaggerated in the fourth