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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 84 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 54 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 36 0 Browse Search
Lysias, Speeches 22 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 20 0 Browse Search
P. Terentius Afer (Terence), Adelphi: The Brothers (ed. Henry Thomas Riley) 14 0 Browse Search
Isocrates, Speeches (ed. George Norlin) 12 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 12 0 Browse Search
Homer, Odyssey 10 0 Browse Search
M. Tullius Cicero, Orations, for his house, Plancius, Sextius, Coelius, Milo, Ligarius, etc. (ed. C. D. Yonge) 10 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller). You can also browse the collection for Cyprus (Cyprus) or search for Cyprus (Cyprus) in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 3 document sections:

Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 1, chapter 1 (search)
me the leader of the Medes by their full consent and of the HyrcaniansThe extent of his kingdom by theirs; he then conquered Syria, Assyria, Arabia, Cappadocia, both Phrygias, Lydia, Caria, Phoenicia, and Babylonia; he ruled also over Bactria, India, and Cilicia; and he was likewise king of the Sacians, Paphlagonians, Magadidae, and very many other nations, of which one could not even tell the names; he brought under his sway the Asiatic Greeks also; and, descending to the sea, he added both Cyprus and Egypt to his empire. He ruled over these nations, even though theyThe secret of his power did not speak the same language as he, nor one nation the same as another; for all that, he was able to cover so vast a region with the fear which he inspired, that he struck all men with terror and no one tried to withstand him; and he was able to awaken in all so lively a desire to please him, that they always wished to be guided by his will. Moreover, the tribes that he brought into subjection to
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 6 (search)
to Cappadocia, Artacamas to Phrygia Major, Chrysantas to Lydia and Ionia, Adusius to Caria (it was he for whom the Carians had petitioned), and Pharnuchus to Aeolia and Phrygia on the Hellespont. He sent out no Persians as satraps over Cilicia or Cyprus or Paphlagonia, because these he thought joined his expedition against Babylon voluntarily; he did, however, require even these nations to pay tribute. As Cyrus then organized the service, so is it even to this day: the garrisons upon the citadeles Syria even to the Indian Ocean. His next expedition is said to have gone to Egypt and to have subjugated that country also. From that time on his empire was bounded on the east by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Black Sea, on the west by Cyprus and Egypt, and on the south by Ethiopia. The extremes of his empire are uninhabitable, on the one side because of the heat, on another because of the cold, on another because of too much water, and on the fourth because of too little. Cyrus himse
Xenophon, Cyropaedia (ed. Walter Miller), Book 8, chapter 8 (search)
That Cyrus's empire was the greatest and mostThe empire and its disintegration glorious of all the kingdoms in Asia—of that it may be its own witness. For it was bounded on the east by the Indian Ocean, on the north by the Black Sea, on the west by Cyprus and Egypt, and on the south by Ethiopia. And although it was of such magnitude, it was governed by the single will of Cyrus; and he honoured his subjects and cared for them as if they were his own children; and they, on their part, reverenced Cyrus as a father. Still, as soon as Cyrus was dead, his children at once fell into dissension, states and nations began to revolt, and everything began to deteriorate. And that what I say is the truth, I will prove, beginning with the Persians' attitude toward religion.lgt;I know, for example, that in early times the kings and their officers, in their dealings with even the worst offenders, would abide by an oath that they might have given, and be true to any pledge they might have made. For had