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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 60 2 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1 54 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 24 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 14 0 Browse Search
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 12 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 10 0 Browse Search
The writings of John Greenleaf Whittier, Volume 7. (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1862., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Liberia (Liberia) or search for Liberia (Liberia) in all documents.

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ee colored youth were educated in New England, toward the close of the last century, with express reference to missionary labor in Africa in connection with the Colonization movement. Two of these ultimately, though at a mature age, migrated to Liberia, where they died soon after. Thirty-eight American blacks emigrated to Sierra Leone in 1815, under the auspices and in the vessel of one of their own number. The initial organization of the American Colonization Society took place at Princetonnal number dispatched during the succeeding thirty years was not far from eight thousand. The city founded by the original emigrants received the name of Monrovia, and in 1847 the colony declared itself an independent republic under the name of Liberia. That republic still exists, enjoying a moderate and equable prosperity, in spite of its unhealthiness for whites, and for all but duly acclimated blacks, on account of its tropical and humid location. But the Colonization movement, though b
take command, as was expected. The New Orleans Picayune of about May 15th, 1861, said: All the Massachusetts troops now in Washington are negroes, with the exception of two or three drummer boys. Gen. Butler, in command, is a native of Liberia. Our readers may recollect old Ben, the barber, who kept a shop in Poydras-street, and emigrated to Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. The North was habitually represented to the ignorant masses of the South as thirsting Liberia with a small competence. Gen. Butler is his son. The North was habitually represented to the ignorant masses of the South as thirsting for their blood and bent on their extermination — as sending forth her armies instructed to ravish, kill, lay waste, and destroy; and the pulpit was not far behind the press in disseminating these atrocious falsehoods. Hence, the Southern militia, and even conscripts, were impelled by a hate or horror of their adversaries which rendered them valiant in their own despite, making them sometimes victors where the memories of their grandfathers at Charleston and at Guilford, and of their fathers a
e, of S. C., remarks on the adoption of the Constitution, 45, 47. Butler, Gen. Benjamin F., in the Charleston Convention, 311; 318; arrives in Maryland with the 8th Mass., 468; at Annapolis, 469-70: takes possession of Baltimore, 471; born in Liberia, 508; 528; seizes Geo. P. Kane, 529; commands the Hatteras expedition, 599; 600; 627. Butler, Gen. Wm. O., of Ky., nominated for Vice-President, 191. Butler, Major, (Rebel,) killed at Belmont, 597. C. Cabell, E. C., envoy from Jacksy, 620. Lex, Charles E., speech at Philadelphia, 365. Lexington, Mo., a Border Ruffian rendezvous, 283; the siege and battle of, 586 to 589; Col. Mulligan's official report, 588-9; why not reenforced, 593-4. Liberator, The, 116; 122. Liberia, colonization of, 72. liberty, Mo., Federal Arsenal seized at, 490. Lincoln, Abraham, in the Rep. Convention of 1156, 246; his canvass of Illinois with Douglas, 301; his speeches there. 3801-2; nominated for the Presidency, 321; his posit