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The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Herodotus, The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley) 202 0 Browse Search
Polybius, Histories 132 0 Browse Search
M. Annaeus Lucanus, Pharsalia (ed. Sir Edward Ridley) 56 0 Browse Search
Pausanias, Description of Greece 44 0 Browse Search
Diodorus Siculus, Library 34 0 Browse Search
Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer) 28 0 Browse Search
Strabo, Geography 20 0 Browse Search
Richard Hakluyt, The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of the English Nation 18 0 Browse Search
P. Vergilius Maro, Aeneid (ed. Theodore C. Williams) 16 0 Browse Search
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War 14 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More). You can also browse the collection for Libya (Libya) or search for Libya (Libya) in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 2, line 193 (search)
e lofty Alps, the cloud-topped Apennines. And Phaethon, as he inhaled the air, burning and scorching as a furnace blast, and saw destruction on the flaming world, and his great chariot wreathed in quenchless fires, was suddenly unable to endure the heat, the smoke and cinders, and he swooned away.— if he had known the way, those winged steeds would rush as wild unguided.— then the skin of Ethiopians took a swarthy hue, the hot blood tingling to the surface: then the heat dried up the land of Libya; dishevelled, the lorn Nymphs, lamenting, sought for all their emptied springs and lakes in vain; Boeotia wailed for Dirce's cooling wave, and Argos wailed for Amymone's stream— and even Corinth for the clear Pyrene. Not safer from the flames were distant streams;— the Tanais in middle stream was steaming and old Peneus and Teuthrantian Caicus, Ismenus, rapid and Arcadian Erymanthus; and even Xanthus destined for a second burning, and tawny-waved Lycormas, and Meander, turning and twisting,
P. Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses (ed. Brookes More), Book 5, line 74 (search)
And Phorbas the descendant of Methion. Who hailed from far Syene, with his friend Amphimedon of Libya, in their haste to join the battle, slipped up in the blood and fell together: just as they arose that glittering sword was driven through the throat of Phorbas into the ribs of his companion. But Erithus, the son of Actor, swung a battle-ax, so weighty, Perseus chose not combat with his curving blade. He seized in his two hands a huge bowl, wrought around with large design, outstanding from its mass. This, lifting up, he dashes on his foe, who vomits crimson blood, and falling back beats on the hard floor with his dying head. And next he slew Caucasian Abaris, and Polydaemon—from Semiramis nobly descended—and Sperchius, son, Lycetus, long-haired Elyces, unshorn, Clytus and Phlegias, the hero slew;— and trampled on the dying heaped around. Not daring to engage his enemy in open contest, Phineus held aloof, and hurled his javelin. Badly aimed—by some mischance or turned—it wounded